Celiac disease

Santa Hat Cupcakes

gluten free Christmas cupcakes

Santa Hat Cupcakes courtesy of Lauryn Cohen

I know you might think I’m clever, but really, I’m not. Full credit goes to Lauryn Cohen, aka Bella Baker, who came up with this cute concept. Lauren is the queen of sweet and is known for her uniquely creative treats and crafts. She recently launched a holiday baking guide (entitled Sweet Gifts Holiday Baking and Crafting Guide– available nationwide) filled with innovative and delicious recipes for the holidays.

Lauryn was nice enough to share one of her creations with The Family Chef. In this recipe, she calls for a red velvet cupcake (you will find a gluten-free, no-dye recipe in my upcoming cookbook). You can always use a basic vanilla (gluten-free).

Here is her technique for making super cute holiday cupcakes for your friends or family. Read More »

Scientists uncover further steps leading to celiac disease

Contact: Sally Webster
s.webster@qmul.ac.uk
44-207-882-5404
Queen Mary, University of London

Scientists who last year identified a new genetic risk factor for coeliac disease, have, following continued research, discovered an additional seven gene regions implicated in causing the condition. The team, lead by David van Heel, Professor of Gastrointestinal Genetics at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, have further demonstrated that of the nine coeliac gene regions now know, four of these are also predisposing factors for type 1 diabetes. Their research sheds light not only on the nature of coeliac disease, but on the common origins of both diseases. It is published online today (2 March 2008) in Nature Genetics.

Professor van Heel and his team, including collaborators from Ireland, the Netherlands, and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, first performed a genome wide association study in coeliac disease. Genetic markers across the genome were compared in coeliac disease subjects versus healthy controls. They then assessed around 1,000 of the strongest markers in a further ~ 5,000 samples. Their results identified seven new risk regions, six of which harbour important genes critical in the control of immune responses, highlighting their significance in the development of the disease.

Coeliac disease is common in the West, afflicting around 1 per cent of the population. It is an immune-mediated disease, triggered by intolerance to gluten (a protein found in wheat, barley and rye containing foods), that prevents normal digestion and absorption of nutrients. If undetected it can lead to a number of often severe problems among them anaemia, poor bone health, fatigue and weight loss. Currently only a restricted diet can diminish symptoms.

Professor van Heel said: “So far our findings explain nearly half of the heritability of coeliac disease – now studies with many more samples from individuals with coeliac disease are needed to identify the precise causal genetic variants from each region, and understand how these influence biological processes.”

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The research was funded by Coeliac UK and The Wellcome Trust. Coeliac disease case studies are available for interview from Coeliac UK upon request.

The paper, ‘Newly identified genetic risk variant for celiac disease related to the immune response’ is published online, on 2 March 2008, in Nature Genetics.

For case studies contact:
Kate Newman
Press Office
Coeliac UK
Tel: 020 8399 7478
Mobile: 07952 071014

Notes to editors:

Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry offers international levels of excellence in research and teaching while serving a population of unrivalled diversity amongst which cases of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, TB, oral disease and cancers are prevalent, within east London and the wider Thames Gateway. Through partnership with our linked trusts, notably Barts and The London NHS Trust, and our associated University Hospital trusts – Homerton, Newham, Whipps Cross and Queen’s – the School’s research and teaching is informed by an exceptionally wide ranging and stimulating clinical environment.

At the heart of the School’s mission lies world class research, the result of a focused programme of recruitment of leading research groups from the UK and abroad and a £100 million investment in state-of-the-art facilities. Research is focused on translational research, cancer, cardiology, clinical pharmacology, inflammation, infectious diseases, stem cells, dermatology, gastroenterology, haematology, diabetes, neuroscience, surgery and dentistry.

The School is nationally and internationally recognised for research in these areas, reflected in the £40 million it attracts annually in research income. Its fundamental mission, with its partner NHS Trusts, and other partner organisations such as CRUK, is to ensure that that the best possible clinical service is underpinned by the very latest developments in scientific and clinical teaching, training and research.

Websites
www.coeliac.org.uk
www.coeliac.co.uk/about_us/press_office/writing_about_coeliac_disease/118.asp
http://www.wellcome.ac.uk
http://www.icms.qmul.ac.uk/
http://www.icms.qmul.ac.uk/Profiles/Gastro/van%20Heel%20David.htm
http://www.nature.com/ng/index.html

Scientists Uncover Further Steps Leading to Celiac Disease

 

 3 06 08

Contact: Sally Webster
s.webster@qmul.ac.uk
44-207-882-5404
Queen Mary, University of London

Scientists who last year identified a new genetic risk factor for coeliac disease, have, following continued research, discovered an additional seven gene regions implicated in causing the condition. The team, lead by David van Heel, Professor of Gastrointestinal Genetics at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, have further demonstrated that of the nine coeliac gene regions now know, four of these are also predisposing factors for type 1 diabetes. Their research sheds light not only on the nature of coeliac disease, but on the common origins of both diseases. It is published online today (2 March 2008) in Nature Genetics. Read More »

Seashore Celiac Support Group Announces 11th Annual Gluten Free Picnic June 24th

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

Seashore Celiacs Annual Picnic

Photo Courtesy Linda Pickett

Seashore Celiac Support Group CSA #96 is pleased to announce its 11th annual 100% Gluten Free Picnic in conjunction with Central Jersey Celiac/DH Support Group and Cel-Kids Network CSA#58.

Now bigger and better than ever!!

When: Sunday June 24, 2012 (Rain or Shine), 1 to 5 pm

Where: SharkRiverPark–Neptune,NJ

Directions: http://seashoreceliacs.org/SharkRiver.htm

All family & friends of celiacs welcome!

Please RSVP by June 18 with the gluten–free dish you’ll Read More »

Separate Gluten-Free Appliances: Are they necessary?

A question that many new gluten-free eaters ask themselves.

Do I really need to go out and buy a new toaster? Will I really get sick from crumbs?

The above questions are asked at the same time that the overwhelming feeling of what has my life become? starts to set in.

GlutenFree tester ToasterDo you have a dedicated gluten-free toaster? I do. I went out and got one the day I went gluten-free. If I was going to do this whole change my lifestyle thing, I was going to do it right. That’s just the kind of person I am though. I don’t half-*** anything, so I definitely wasn’t going to cut any corners as I got myself healthy. No way, no how.

But, not everyone feels the way I feel. Maybe they don’t get the same symptoms from gluten that I do, and see this all as a bunch Read More »

Seventy Percent of Canadians Support No Exemptions to Proposed Food Labelling Regulations for Allergic and Celiac Consumers

OTTAWA, Feb. 2 /CNW/ – Prime Minister Stephen Harper is being asked to act on the concerns of millions of Canadians with food allergies and celiac disease and listen to the advice of prominent national medical, consumer and health organizations and pass proposed federal food labelling regulations now. The Prime Minister is also encouraged to heed the results of a new public opinion poll showing close to 70% of Canadians want regulations to affect all pre-packaged food and beverages and not grant a special exemption for the beer industry.

According to Angus Reid Public Opinion, 67% of Canadians approve of the proposed rules so they apply to all food and beverage companies, while only 21% believe the government should change the proposed rules to exempt the brewery industry from Read More »

Sex and the Celiac: Dating Tips for the Gluten-Free

When you have celiac disease or another gluten-related disorder, dating can be fairly tricky. With so much focus on restaurant outings, movie theater snacks and the post-date kiss, people with a gluten-related disorder have a lot more to think about than just finding the perfect outfit.

The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) shares these 5 tips for navigating the dating scene while staying gluten-free. Read More »

Shared Genes in Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

A 2008 study provides more evidence that there is a link between celiac disease and gluten. This article in Scientific American reviews the study.

Diabetes and celiac disease: A Genetic Connection
Patients with type 1 diabetes have been known to be more prone to another autoimmune disorder, celiac disease, in which gluten in wheat, rye and barley triggers an immune response that damages the small intestine or gut. Now there’s evidence that the two diseases have a genetic link: they share at least seven chromosome regions.

The discovery, published in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine, indicates that both diseases may be triggered by similar genetic and environmental mechanisms, such as certain foods, that cause patients’ immune systems to become overactive and destroy healthy instead of infected tissue. Previous research has found that celiac disease is five to 10 times more common in people with type 1 diabetes than in the general population, an editorial accompanying the study notes.

“These findings suggest common mechanisms causing both celiac and type 1 diabetes – we did not expect to see this very high degree of shared genetic risk factors,” said study co-author David van Heel, a gastrointestinal geneticist at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Van Heel and his colleagues studied genetic material or DNA from about 20,000 people, half of them healthy, nearly half with type 1 diabetes, and 2,000 with celiac disease. The overlapping genetic variants occurred on regions of chromosomes (parts of cells that carry genetic code) that are believed to regulate the gut’s immune system, the BBC notes.

Type 1 diabetes occurs when a person’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy beta cells in the pancreas that produce the hormone insulin, which is needed to convert glucose into energy. In celiac disease, a similar attack occurs on the small intestine when sufferers eat gluten-rich grains, causing inflammation in the gut that can lead to bloating, abdominal pain, nausea, constipation, diarrhea, fatigue, anemia, headaches, weight loss and failure to thrive in children. Whereas diabetes 1 patients must inject insulin daily to make up for their deficiency, people with celiac disease can avoid damage and symptoms by sticking to a gluten-free diet.

“The finding raises the question of whether eating cereal and other gluten products might trigger type 1 diabetes by altering the function of the gut and its interaction with the pancreas, the authors write. But Robert Goldstein, chief scientific officer of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, which helped fund the study, says it would be premature to assume from this study that gluten is also a diabetes trigger.

“I fear the newspaper headlines in the popular press will read like, ‘Eating wheat will cause type 1 diabetes,’” Goldstein tells us. “The presence or absence of these associations has to be linked to some biological consequence” for a person’s health.

Article Source: http://www.sciam.com/blog/60-second-science/post.cfm?id=diabetes-and-celiac-disease-a-genet-2008-12-11

*UK Study Source: Shared and Distinct Genetic Variants in Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease, New England Journal of Medicine. http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/NEJMoa0807917

Shocking Facts About Celiac Disease

celiac awareness month

Photo credit: Celiac Disease Awareness Month

May is National Celiac Disease Awareness Month, so it seems appropriate to share some medical facts about this autoimmune disease that just might shock you.

These facts come from Dr. Tom O’Bryan who is is a nationally recognized speaker and workshop leader specializing in gluten sensitivity and celiac disease.  Dr. O’Bryan’s specialty is in teaching the many manifestations of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease as they occur inside and outside of the Read More »

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