Celiac disease

Nutrient Deficiencies Symptom Chart: Know Where You Stand So You Can Control Your Health

nutrient deficiency symptoms

Know the Symptoms of Nutrient Deficiencies so You Can Be Healthy!

The impact of nutritional deficiencies on health should be common knowledge among the medical professional community. All doctors, nurses and other medical professionals should be able to quickly and accurately identify and diagnose functional nutritional deficiencies in patients and correct those deficiencies. Unfortunately, this is not the case.

Medical teaching institutions do not focus on nutrition, so many medical professionals are not equipped to recognize the signs of nutritional deficiencies until the patient is extremely sick. In most cases, the patient is able to function, just not at his or her potential. He or she may have weight issues, skin, hair or Read More »

Olmesartan Blood Pressure Medicine Linked to Celiac Disease Type Villous Atrophy

Olmesartan Benicar Villous Atrophy Celiac DiseaseI just received an email from the Celiac Disease Research Center at Columbia University regarding a study showing a possible association between a blood pressure medication and villous atrophy. The blood pressure medication is called olmesartan and it is also known as Benicar, Benicar HCT, Azor, and Olmetec.

According to this article, the three-year study was conducted by the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota and it included 22 patients who had symptoms of celiac disease, but antibody blood tests did not support that diagnosis. During this study patients improved with discontinuation of the drug, while a gluten-free diet had had no impact on their Read More »

One Grain More – Les Mis Food Allergy Parody

The Les Misérables food allergy parody that will knock your hypoallergenic socks off!

With the amazingly popular hit musical Les Miserables coming to theaters oh so soon (only 26 days, but who’s counting?!), I thought it would be appropriate to share this funny and amazing “One Grain More” video made by four people who are struggling to cook gluten free.  I loved the line, “This never ending road to gluten free,” boy does that seem true sometimes!

Read More »

Osteomalacia in Adult Celiac Disease

Osteomalacia is common in celiac disease. Osteomalacia can occur at any age. It children, it is called rickets.  It is a metabolic bone disorder that involves slow loss of minerals from bone tissue throughout the skeleton, stemming from inadequate absorption of vitamin D. As minerals are dissolved from bone tissue to provide for essential functions elsewhere in the body, bones gradually lose their hardness.

Consequently, pronounced softening of the bones characterizes osteomalacia. Soft bones become deformed, especially bones of the arms, legs, spine, thorax and pelvis. The softer bones have a normal amount of collagen, a strong fibrous protein in the bone matrix (osteoid) that gives bone its structure and tensile capacity, but there is not sufficient calcium and phosphate minerals available to properly mineralize or be deposited in the osteoid to give it necessary hardness. Read More »

Osteopenia Found in 50% of Children with Celiac Disease

gym_06Research shows celiac disease can cause brittle bones in children. Can a gluten-free diet correct it?

A teenage gymnast is completing an exercise at the US Nationals gymnastics competition. At seventeen years of age, she is one of the top athletes in the country, physically strong and incredibly fit.

Both her wrists fracture during the dismount.

Doctors test her bone density to find out why her bones broke so easily. Although she is just a teenager, she is diagnosed with osteopenia, the precursor to osteoporosis and a bone disorder that normally afflicts people over 55. She has never had gastrointestinal issues, but her doctors test her for celiac disease anyway because something is obviously wrong with the way she is absorbing and/or metabolizing calcium. Read More »

Osteoporosis and Pilates

As baby boomers segue from child-rearing to retirement, they find themselves bombarded by the media with information about osteoporosis. It makes sense, considering that more than 44 million American men and women age 50 and older have osteoporosis or its precursor, osteopenia. So between news articles about calcium and vitamin D, Sally Field promoting the drug Boniva on TV commercials and the now-ubiquitous term “weight-bearing exercise,” we are all hearing a great deal about this epidemic.

Yet controversy abounds, with new findings questioning the benefits of calcium as well as the risks versus benefits of osteoporosis medications. The conflicting information is enough to overwhelm even the most media-savvy consumer. But the one continuously advocated method of addressing the condition is exercise. Not only does exercise help to maintain and build strong bones, but it can improve balance and reflexes and thereby prevent falls, the most dangerous threat to those with fragile bones. According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation, 60 percent of those who fracture a hip still cannot walk independently a year later. Clearly, the goal should be to stay strong, agile and upright. Read More »

Osteoporosis in Celiac Disease and How to Prevent It

osteoporosis celiac disease glutenOsteoporosis, or brittle bones, is a generalized bone disorder involving the slow loss of bone mass throughout the skeleton that results in diminished bone mineral density (BMD). Thinning, fragile bones maintain normal cell appearance but have a rapid turnover so that more bone is taken up and removed than is laid down. The result is bone weakness that predisposes people with osteoporosis to fractures.

Osteopenia refers to the progression of bone tissue loss in the range between normal to osteoporosis.

What are Bones?

Bones are dynamic structures made up of living connective tissue and certain minerals. Connective tissue provides the shape of bones and holds calcium phosphate mineral for hardness and Read More »

Over 300 Symptoms Linked to Gluten and Celiac Disease. How Is This Possible?

 

 In 2007, Gluten Free Works published “Recognizing Celiac Disease,” the first work to present over 300 signs, symptoms, associated disorders and complications gathered from documented medical research from around the world.  The book proved that researchers were finding hundreds of health problems associated with celiac disease and gluten.  This list is now being used by celiac disease centers, national celiac organizations and health organizations to help identify at risk patients and determine whether patient symptoms are consistent with celiac disease.

But how can one disorder cause so many problems?  Here’s a look at one way…nutritional deficiencies. Read More »

Peanut Butter & Jelly Quesadilla Wrap Up!

By the title of this post, I am sure many of you are probably wondering what I have in store for you today, but trust me, it’s a good little invention on my part!

PB-J-Quesdilla-Wrap-up--1024x682

Lately I am trying to limit my consumption of gluten-free bread products; not with the intention to lose weight, but rather I have realized that I feel better when I keep it to a limit. However, being someone who is always at the gym I need carbs in my diet to reenergize.

The other day I really want a PB & J sandwich. My only problem was I didn’t Read More »

Pennsylvania Resolution Aims to Increase Celiac Disease Awareness Statewide

PA Legislature proclaims April ‘Celiac Disease Awareness Month.’

Ambler, PA, April 03, 2009 –(PR.com)– Legislation passed by the Pennsylvania House of Representatives General Assembly recognizes April 2009 as the state’s official ‘Celiac Disease Awareness Month’. With the passing of House Resolution 153 (HR 153), Pennsylvania takes the lead in raising awareness for celiac disease as the most common and most undiagnosed autoimmune disorder in the United States.

HR 153 was ratified unanimously, 196-0, on March 31st, 2009 with the assistance of its prime sponsor, state representative Craig A. Dally (R).

Geoffrey M. Roche, advocacy chairman for the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) and resident of Bethlehem, PA, collaborated extensively with representative Dally on the creation and development of HR153, and lobbied for its passage in the State House of Representatives.

“I would like to thank my State Representative, Craig Dally, and the entire State House for recognizing the impact this disease has on many Pennsylvanians and for assisting the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness in creating awareness that will ensure individuals with celiac get diagnosed, and correctly manage the disease.” says Roche. “I understand first hand the impact this disease has on one’s life and the need for education and awareness across our entire nation.”

The entire resolution in its entirety can be read on the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness website, www.celiaccentral.org.

Roche’s role in the successful sanctioning of HR153 and his passionate efforts on behalf of NFCA, stem from his personal experience with celiac disease, having been diagnosed with the autoimmune disorder just 11 months ago.

NFCA founder and president Alice Bast describes HR153 as, “‘The first step in reforming the US health care system in relation to autoimmune diseases, preventive care and chronic disease management.”

NFCA and Roche aim to pass similar resolutions in every state nationwide, providing assistance and resources for citizens working on legislative efforts for the purpose of spreading awareness of celiac disease, a disease which current estimates suggest affect 1 in every 133 Americans. Only 120,000 of individuals with the autoimmune digestive disorder, roughly 1 in every 4700, have been diagnosed.

“Early assessment of celiac is crucial in preventing the onset of complications such as other autoimmune disorders, serious illnesses, and some cancers for individuals with this disease.” says Bast.

Those interested in enacting legislation in their states should contact the NFCA at info@celiaccentral.org, by phone (215) 325-1306 ext.101, or visit the ‘Get Involved’ section on the NFCA website, www.celiaccentral.org for information.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune digestive disease that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. It is triggered by consumption of the protein called gluten, which is found in wheat, barley and rye. Left untreated, people with celiac disease can develop further complications such as other autoimmune diseases, osteoporosis, thyroid disease, and some cancers. An estimated three million Americans have celiac disease, but only about 1 in every 4700 with the disease receives an accurate diagnosis. Currently, the only treatment is a lifelong gluten-free diet.

###

NFCA is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to raising awareness and funding for celiac disease that will advance research, education and screening amongst medical professionals, children and adults. Visit www.celiaccentral.org or call 215-325-1306 for further information.

Contact Information
National Foundation for Celiac Awareness
Whitney Ehret
215-325-1306
whitney@celiaccentral.org
www.celiaccentral.org

>