Celiac disease

Celiac Sprue Association Conference Oct 4-6th!

 

I am really excited to be moderating a panel on Gluten Free Blogging at 35th Annual Celiac Sprue Association on October 4-6thon Long Island in Hauppauge, NY. There will be great sessions on the latest and greatest from the Columbia Celiac Center, dietary tips, gluten-sensitivity, and panels on gluten-free baking, travel, and dining out. There will even be a clam bake, wine tasting, tours and more!

And the session will focus on how gluten-free blogging can benefit EVERYONE—well, anyone with a computer. Blogging is a great way to connect and share ideas, get information and support and be dazzled by the recipes and pictures! This virtual community is a fantastic resource for anyone with Celiac or on a Read More »

“Autism: Made In the U.S.A” film: what it has to do with Gluten

A new documentary produced by Gary Null, a natural health advocate and activist, takes aim at our modern medical establishment and the various ways it could possibly be contributing to chronic illness, neurological phenomenon and conditions, and specifically, Autism.

Null delves into the relationship between vaccines, food, environmental pollutants, the childhood Autism pandemic in America and what can be done about the increasing numbers. According to the Center for Disease Control, as of 2010, 1 in every 110 children will be diagnosed with Autism. Read More »

“Forgotten in the Oven” Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

If you are looking for something simple yet tasty to whip up for a snack – try out this “Forgotten” chocolate chip cookie recipe!

Don't be turned off by their appearance, trust me they are SUPER tasty!

Don’t be turned off by their appearance, trust me they are SUPER tasty!

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

2 egg whites
¼ teaspoon salt
2/3 cup sugar
1 teas. Vanilla
small 6 oz. mini chips
2 drops of food color (any color – green is festive!)

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375°
2. Add two egg whites into average size mixing bowl and Read More »

“Gluten-free” named #3 top food trend predicted for 2010

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It’s the beginning of a new year and writers, websites, and magazines are compiling their top trends lists, as predictions for the upcoming year. After all, it’s 2010 now, and seems the best time to reflect on all of last year’s most notable food fads in order to foresee what the upcoming year will bring us in food pop culture and consumerism.

Gluten_free_labelGluten-free eating has become more and more popular and mainstream over the last few years, as more people are being diagnosed with Celiac disease and gluten intolerance/allergies (either by medical professionals or via simple elimination diets). So it’s not surprising that among the many predictions for 2010’s favorite edibles, The Daily Beast has named gluten-free food as number three on their Ten Food Trends For 2010 list. As the website says, Read More »

10 Quick Facts About Celiac Disease to Pass On

May is Celiac Disease Awareness Month. Here are 10 quick facts you can pass along to your friends and family to help increase awareness.

  1. Celiac Disease is not an allergy. It is an autoimmune disorder triggered by eating gluten in wheat, barley, rye and oats.
  2. You cannot “grow out” of celiac disease. It is a lifelong condition.
  3. The most common “look” of celiac disease is…totally normal. Not fat. Not skinny.
  4. Celiac Disease is the most commonly “missed” diagnosis in medicine. Over 85% of people with celiac disease go undiagnosed.
  5. Celiac Disease damage is cumulative. The longer it goes on, the worse symptoms and associated conditions become.
  6. Celiac Disease is real. It has existed for thousands of years, but has grown in prevalence. Tests have only recently been developed to detect it.
  7. Undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease costs billions of dollars each year in treatment for symptoms and complications as well as lost productivity.
  8. Celiac Disease is COMMON, affecting an estimated 1 in 100 persons. That said, it was thought the prevalence was 1 in 5,000 less than 10 years ago and 1 in 15,000 before that. The true prevalence may be higher.
  9. Celiac Disease symptoms can present at any age. 9 months. 9 years. 90 years. Often, symptoms present early, but are not recognized.
  10. Celiac Disease tests are not pass/fail and not foolproof. Tests should be administered again if symptoms persist because a “negative” can become a positive at a later date.

15 Celiac Disease Facts Everyone Should Know

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Celiac disease awareness is growing, but misinformation still abounds. Here are 15 celiac disease facts every doctor, patient and member of the public should know.

1. 1 in 700 –

    The average prevalence of celiac disease in the United States 1950. (Mayo)

2. 1 in 100 –

    The average worldwide prevalence of celiac disease across all races today. (NIH) The average prevalence of celiac disease in the United States today. (Mayo)

3. $8,500 – The average annual estimated healthcare cost of each person with untreated celiac disease in the United States. (Cigna/Columbia Celiac Disease Center study) Read More »

21 Important Celiac Disease Facts You Need to Know

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  1. Celiac disease is the most common genetic autoimmune disease in the world.
  1. Celiac disease is the most commonly misdiagnosed disease in the world.
  1. Celiac disease blood tests are not pass / fail. They measure antibody levels that suggest how likely an intestinal biopsy will discover damage consistent with celiac disease.
  1. Celiac disease can affect any genetically predisposed person of every race or gender and can first present symptoms at any age.
  1. Optimal treatment of celiac disease includes 1) a 100% strict gluten-free diet, 2) nutrient deficiency identification and replenishment and 3) education and support that meet the physical and emotional needs of the patient.
  1. Most cases of unresponsive celiac disease are due to inadvertent gluten exposure, where the person is consuming gluten without realizing it.
  1. The average person with celiac disease has a normal body mass index. The traditional thinking was that a person with celiac disease would be underweight.
  1. Silent celiac disease refers to a person who tests positive on blood test and villous atrophy on intestinal biopsy, but exhibits no overt symptoms.
  1. Celiac disease presents submicroscopic damage causing nutrient deficiencies before villous atrophy. That is, before an endoscopy with biopsy finds intestinal damage, damage can already be occurring.
  1. 50% of people diagnosed with Celiac disease exhibit neurological symptoms at the time of diagnosis.
  1. Doctors consider celiac disease to be a gastrointestinal disease. Many people with neurological symptoms due to celiac disease do not exhibit gastrointestinal symptoms. These people have a decreased chance of receiving a proper diagnosis and treatment.
  1. Anxiety can be the only symptom of celiac disease. In this case it is due to nutrient deficiencies.
  1. Celiac disease tests are not pass / fail. A patient can test “negative” on one day and positive two weeks later. Follow up testing should be performed if symptoms do not resolve.
  1. Patient education is the most important predictor of good clinical outcome in celiac disease. The more you know, the more likely you will be to avoid gluten, develop a diet that works best for your health and lifestyle, get well and stay healthy.
  1. Celiac disease symptoms can be completely different among family members.
  1. Celiac disease symptoms number over 300, are widely varied in nature, affecting every and any body system and organ. (The 300 symptoms list was first presented in “Recognizing Celiac Disease,” authored by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN and published by Glutenfreeworks.com in 2007.)
  1. Symptoms in celiac disease are due to inflammation and/or nutrient deficiencies from chronic intestinal damage.
  1. Celiac disease diagnosis can take10 years or more from the time symptoms first present. It is frequently the last disease doctors consider.
  1. Celiac disease affects over 3 million people in the United States, yet the vast majority are not diagnosed. The symptoms of celiac disease are frequently considered the definitive diagnosis, leaving the true underlying cause untreated.
  1. Exposure to gluten is the most important environmental factor in celiac disease. The sooner gluten is removed from the diet, the more likely full remission will be achieved and long term complications can be avoided.
  1. Although celiac disease is now known to cause over 300 symptoms, the medical community has traditionally instructed doctors that celiac disease affects children, presenting symptoms of 1) diarrhea, 2) wasting muscles, 3) anemia, and 4) abdominal distention (bloating). You must request celiac disease testing if you do not fit this list, and often even if you do. Assuming doctors look for celiac disease is a mistake.

This article brought to you by the Gluten Free Works Health Guide! Everything you need to know about celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, your symptoms and how to fix them!

3 Reasons Being Gluten-Free is NOT The End of the World

So you’re diagnosed with Celiac Disease or a Gluten Sensitivity and you’re all like, “It’s the end of the world,” and you proceed to rant about how a life without gluten is not a life worth living. Even though you might want to listen to R.E.M. on repeat and binge over your last plate of fried chicken wings, you just need to get over it.

This all might sound a bit harsh to the newbie, but you need to cope, and once you do, you’re going to realize that eating gluten-free is quite possibly the best thing that could have happened to you. Here are three reasons why eating gluten-free doesn’t ruin your life:ryan-gosling-e1362972367527-224x300

Read More »

3 Things That Keep You Sick

makeover your healthHey, I would like to share a very important message with you.

The gluten-free diet is the main treatment for gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. However, removing gluten is not the only thing we must do to regain our health.

Here are the top three things people miss when they go gluten-free. You must do these things in order to achieve good health:

  1. Reduce Inflammation

Inflammation is one of the main causes of disease. In celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, gluten is regarded as the trigger for inflammation. However, inflammation may persist if gluten has caused a dysfunction that is now triggering its own Read More »

3 Things You Should Know Before Filing for a Gluten-Free Food Tax Deduction (United States)

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Are YOU eligible for Tax deductions for gluten-free purchases??

It’s no secret that gluten-free packaged food is oftentimes more expensive than its gluten-containing counterparts, but did you know you might be eligible for a tax deduction to help make up the difference?

If you have never filed for a tax deduction for your gluten-free food purchases, there are some important things you should know before you do: Read More »

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