Diet

Celiac Disease Q & A: Common Nutrition and Celiac Disease Questions

The following questions and answers were developed by the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center at Harvard Medical School:

Q. What is it like for a person you see who is newly diagnosed with Celiac Disease?
A. The gluten-free diet requires more preparation, taking food with you when you travel, making sure that you are safe in dining-out situations or when you are visiting with family or friends. So for some, it is very simple and straight forward and they are already experimenting with new grains like amaranth, buckwheat, millet, sorghum, and teff. But some people are Read More »

Top 10 Gluten-free Items Every Gluten Intolerant Person Needs in Their Pantry

gfchefHere is a list of the top ten gluten-free items that every gluten intolerant person needs in their pantry.

1. A good general gluten-free flour blend. Highly recommended: Better Batter Flour, Meister’s Flour, Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Flour Blend.

2. Xanthan gum or guar gum for your baked recipes.

3. Quality flavored olive oils and vinegars. Make sure these are gluten-free and you can whip up a marinade or salad dressing in no time.

4. Quinoa. Buy pre-rinsed quinoa from a company such as Ancient Harvest and save yourself a few minutes in the kitchen.

5. Great gluten-free bread such as Udi’s or Katz’s. Keep it in the freezer for those times when you need to make a sandwich on something that tastes like the “real” thing. Read More »

Gluten-Free Quinoa & Pumpkin Seed Granola Recipe

I have dubbed this my no-oat granola. I missed that detail when I first started adapting this recipe and was sure Better Homes and Gardens had forgotten to list the oats in the ingredient list. Alas, it was intentional and I’m loving it! This granola with a little homemade almond milk is my new go-to breakfast, snack, and occasional dinner.

Quinoa & Pumpkin Seed Granola

Quinoa & Pumpkin Seed Granola

Read More »

University Finds Gluten-Free Diet Can Lead to Lower Cholesterol and More Fiber

The Go Gluten-Free study assessed the affects of a gluten-free diet on digestive health and fatigue in healthy people, without celiac disease. This was the largest study of its kind in the United Kingdom. Participants ate a gluten-free diet for three weeks and then went back to their regular diet.

The independent research was performed by Rowett Institution of Nutrition and Health at Aberdeen University. The results refute the claims made by many that the gluten-free diet is deficient in nutrients or in some way “bad” for people without celiac disease. In fact, these participants ate better, felt better and experienced decreased cholesterol levels, decreased salt, increased energy levels, clearer thinking and increased fiber contents of their meals.

[Editor’s Note: Article originally published July 2016.]

10 Tips to be a Smarter Gluten-Free Cook

jen_fugosmallEver get tired of cooking? Or maybe you live alone and don’t enjoy cooking for one?

One of the best lessons I’ve learned while being gluten-free is that in order to eat the best you possibly can, you’ve got to cook it yourself. You know that gluten-free doesn’t necessarily mean healthy, so you can’t count on just purchasing products to meet the nutritional needs of your body. But I think you already know that, right? (If you don’t, consider one of these options for learning more about being gluten-free AND healthy!)

Though you know you need to cook, I’ve heard the full spectrum of why people get into a rut and feel like they just can’t make cooking a priority. Whether you Read More »

Eating Gluten-Free? Are You Eating Enough Protein?

chick fil a nuggets gluten freeAccording to a Wall Street Journal article, The Gluten-Free Craze: Is It Healthy? (6/23/2014) — over 29% of people surveyed said they are cutting back gluten consumption or avoiding it completely.

Whether a gluten-free diet is a “craze” or fad for those not diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity is debatable. Important questions for anyone eating a restrictive diet — for whatever reason, should be, “am I eating a balanced diet? Am I eating optimal amounts of protein, healthy fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals for my individual needs?” Read More »

Are You Eating A Low Fiber Gluten-Free Diet?

glutenfreerooseveltlodgebeans[1]Did you know that eating a low fiber diet puts you at an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease — including heart attack and stroke, obesity and even colon cancer? Obviously getting enough fiber in our diets is extremely important for our long term health.

Gluten-free diets don’t have to be low fiber diets but if you’re eating a lot of packaged gluten-free foods, especially snack foods made with refined gluten-free ingredients like white rice flour and corn starch, you may not be getting close to the daily recommendations for fiber.

So what kind of fiber is best and how much fiber do we really need to eat every day to support good health?

Types of Dietary Fiber and Health Benefits

Three kinds of dietary fiber have been identified — soluble fiber, insoluble fiber and one you may not have heard about before called resistant starch. Each type of fiber has unique chemical properties and Read More »

Avoid gluten free dietary blunders

veggiesroots

For people with diagnosed celiac disease or autoimmune related gluten intolerance, eating a gluten free diet is not optional. It’s the only medical treatment currently available and requires 100 percent lifelong adherence.

In addition, other conditions frequently occur alongside celiac disease and gluten intolerance. Maintaining health requires attention to lifestyle behaviors and adequate nutrition that will improve quality of life and prevent complications. The following three tips will ensure success eating gluten free. Read More »

Gluten-Free Diet Tip: Top 5 in-season vegetables for September

Jessica_Meyers_Exam_Pic

Who doesn’t love fall weather? The colors changing on the leaves, cooler weather (well, maybe we will be a couple degrees less than 100), the beginning of a new football season, the glorious Austin City Limits Music Festival, the list goes on. Some of the best tasting vegetables are also in season in the fall such as the mushrooms, oranges, lemons, cauliflower and fennel. All of the following vegetables have unique flavors and can be used in a variety of dishes. The top five are:

Mushrooms
Mushrooms are known for their immune boosting benefits in the nutrition world. They have been used for thousands of years in helping prevent cancer, boost the immune system and are also known as a great anti-aging food. There are several different types of mushrooms that are fabulous to cook with. Try grilling some beefy Portobello’s with Italian seasonings for a nice vegetarian meal this fall.

Oranges
The beloved orange; it’s one of the most popular fruits in North America. Known for the immune boosting vitamin C, oranges have many other health benefits. Oranges also have a good amount of Potassium (which helps with muscle contraction), fiber and vitamin A. Oranges are very versatile when it comes to cooking. Try this yummy recipe from celiac.com: Orange Chicken. Read More »

>