Celiac disease

Smart Balance Acquires Glutino Food Group for $66.3 Million

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

On August 3, Smart Balance, Inc. announced it purchased Glutino Food Group for $66.3 million cash.  With this purchase, Smart Balance picks up arguably the #1 most recognized gluten-free brand in the United States.

Smart Balance Gluten FreePARAMUS, N.J., Aug. 3, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — Smart Balance, Inc. (NasdaqGM: SMBL) announced it acquired 100% of the equity interest of Importations DE-RO-MA, which owns Glutino Food Group (“Glutino”), for $66.3 million, from Claridge, aMontreal-based investment firm.  Based in Laval, Quebec, Glutino is a leading manufacturer and marketer of innovative, premium-priced, gluten-free foods sold under the Glutino and Gluten Free Pantry brands.  Glutino offers a wide range of shelf-stable and frozen gluten-free products, including snack foods, frozen baked goods, frozen entrees and baking mixes throughout North America and on its website www.glutenfree.com.  Glutino had annual sales of $53.9 million during its fiscal year ended March 31, 2011.

Commenting on the announcement, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Stephen Hughes stated,

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Smart Balance Acquires Udi’s Healthy Foods for $125 Million Increases Stake in Gluten Free Market

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

Smart Balance Gluten FreeThe gluten-free food industry is exploding due to increased diagnosis of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Celiac disease is estimated to affect 1 in 100 people, while gluten sensitivity is believed to affect up to 10% of the population. The gluten-free market is one of the fastest growing industries, with 20%+ growth per year with US sales increasing from under $1 billion in 2006 to over $2.5 billion in 2011. With the potential market so large, more and more major corporations are getting into the act.

Smart Balance recently acquired Udi’s Healthy Foods, the industry leader in the gluten-free breads and baked goods category, for $125 million.  This follows Smart Balance’s 2011 acquisition of Glutino Foods, which was at the top of the gluten-free snack industry when purchased. With this recent buy, Smart Balance is fast becoming Read More »

Snickerdoodles Recipe (Egg Free, Gluten Free, Soy Free, Vegan)

We are in Week 3 of the March Madness Kitchen Desserts giveaway with Bob’s Red Mill (CLICK HERE, and scroll to bottom for more details), and my kitchen has had its floors full of gluten free flour and sugar, just because of you (I’m smiling when I say that).

gluten free dairy free soy free egg free snickerdoodle cookies sweetnsavorylifeYou know –

I use to say that going vegan was the toughest thing in the world. And I do not try to deny it, baking without eggs can be – and is – Read More »

So the Doc says no gluten, answers to FAQs

For individuals just diagnosed with celiac disease or other gluten intolerant auto immunity issues, the prospects of learning a whole new way of eating can be daunting at first, especially for those eating the standard American diet (S.A.D.). Following are answers to a list of frequently asked questions:

What grains contain gluten?
Wheat, barley, rye, and any flours derived from these grains. There is controversy over oat’s status.

What are hidden sources of gluten?
Soy sauce (the second ingredient is wheat), barbecue sauce, marinades, teriyaki sauce, Asian sauces, or anything that contains soy sauce in the list of ingredients. Modified food starch, malted drinks, malt vinegar, most cold cereals, grain based veggie burgers, meatballs, breaded foods, durum and semolina pasta (another name for wheat flour), some seasoning blends, and many prepackaged foods.

What foods are safe to eat?
Most whole foods are safe, especially fruits, veggies, legumes, oils, nuts and seeds, and lean meats, and for some people, dairy. Safe grains include rice, corn, millet, tapioca, sorghum, teff, buckwheat (not related to wheat), potato starch, bean flours, nut flours, and coconut flour. Some people may tolerate gluten free oats, but caution is advised as there is controversy over their gluten free status. Visit this link for more information. Read More »

So You Want to Start a Celiac Support Group?

celiac disease support group

Celiac Disease Support Groups Are Priceless

I was diagnosed in 1996 when “celiac” and “gluten free” were still foreign words.  I remember the first conversation I had with a fellow Celiac.  I sat on the floor in my bedroom, confused and overwhelmed, listening to the kind voice on the other end of the telephone talking me through gluten free condiment options.  She introduced me to our local support group and within a few years, I was standing as the president.

Support groups serve a great purpose of providing grass root support from others in a similar situation.  This is priceless for newly diagnosed Celiacs and those who love them.  There can be an initial overwhelming sense of confusion and helplessness.  The good news is that even though there is a learning curve, it gets much easier!  And local support groups can be a huge help in the process.

Whether you want to start a support group or improve an existing one, these tips can help get you motivated and succeed. Read More »

Stanford University Seeks Celiac Disease Study Participants

 

StanfordSeal[1]Jennifer Iscol, of the Celiac Community Foundation of Northern California, just distributed this message regarding a celiac disease study at Stanford University.

“Volunteers are needed for a genetic study on celiac disease at Stanford University. Please consider participating. Community participation is an essential component of Stanford’s celiac disease research. The research benefits all of us and future generations.

http://www.celiaccommunity.org/stanford-celiac-genetic-study/

Announcement from Stanford:

We are conducting a study to understand the genetic basis of celiac disease.  Families with at least one parent and one child with celiac disease are encouraged to enroll together.

The study involves: Read More »

Step by Step Guide: Beginning the Gluten-Free Lifestyle

FOR THE NEWLY-DIAGNOSED CELIAC AND DH’er STEP-BY-STEP:  BEGINNING THE GLUTEN-FREE LIFESTYLE©

by Janet Y. Rinehart, Houston,  and Lynn Rainwater, San Antonio

BEGIN

A definite diagnosis of Celiac Disease (screening blood tests plus endoscopic biopsies) and/or Dermatitis Herpetiformis (skin biopsy) means a lifetime commitment to a gluten-free diet.

  • Take full advantage of your local chapter membership.  Our group leaders and contacts have experience with the gluten-free diet.  We can help you acclimate to the changes in your lifestyle. We welcome your questions.
  • Join national celiac support groups, for example: Read More »

Study Finds 1 in 5 Children With Celiac Disease Sustain Intestinal Damage Even on a Gluten-Free Diet

baby-sleepingIn a new medical study, researchers from MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) and Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) were surprised to discover that nearly one in five children with celiac disease sustained persistent intestinal damage, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet.1

These findings are consistent with research in adults, which showed that more than 33 percent of adult patients on a gluten-free diet have persistent intestinal damage, despite a reduction of symptoms or the results of blood tests.

Current guidelines for pediatric celiac disease patients recommend a single biopsy at diagnosis and follow-up blood testing to monitor recovery of the intestinal mucosa. It was assumed that intestinal mucosa (lining) healed in children after adopting a strict gluten-free diet and that the blood tests would accurately reflect whether healing was occurring or not. It appears this assumption was Read More »


  1. http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161130/Study-finds-1-in-5-pediatric-celiac-disease-patients-on-gluten-free-diet-sustain-persistent-intestinal-damage.aspx 

Study Finds Gluten Causes Digestive Symptoms and Fatigue in People Without Celiac Disease

irritable bowel glutenIn the first double blind randomized placebo-controlled study of gluten and symptoms in people without celiac disease, researchers from Australia have confirmed that gluten is a trigger of digestive symptoms and fatigue. They concede that “non-celiac gluten intolerance” may exist.

 

The researchers challenged and re-challenged people with IBS in whom celiac disease had been excluded whose symptoms were controlled on a gluten-free diet. These individuals were randomized to gluten-free diet with daily supplements of muffins and bread with a standard amount of gluten added or not added. Both the patients and the Read More »

Study reports those diagnosed with celiac disease have reduced subsequent healthcare costs

According to the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearing House, a study published in the December 2008 issue of the Journal of Insurance Medicine reports that researchers from Columbia University and CIGNA HealthCare found that diagnosis of celiac disease substantially reduces subsequent health care costs. 

The research group, led by Peter Green, M.D., a renowned authority in celiac disease from Columbia University,  looked at medical records for 10.2 million CIGNA managed care members.   Read More »

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