Tag Archives: Symptoms

Those Painful Cracks in the Sides of Your Mouth? You Can Fix Them in Two Days

My neighbor came over to chat last week.
 
I noticed he had cracks in the corners of his mouth.
 
He said his doctor told him to keep them moist with chapstick.
 
I said it didn’t work, did it?
 
He said no.
 
I said,”it hurts doesn’t it?”
 
He exclaimed,”Yeah, like Hell!”
 
I told him it was called cheilosis, mainly caused by Riboflavin (vitamin B2) deficiency and gave him half a dozen B50 complex vitamins.

Read More »

My neighbor came over to chat last week.
 
I noticed he had cracks in the corners of his mouth.
 
He said his doctor told him to keep them moist with chapstick.
 
I said it didn’t work, did it?
 
He said no.
 
I said,”it hurts doesn’t it?”
 
He exclaimed,”Yeah, like Hell!”
 
I told him it was called cheilosis, mainly caused by Riboflavin (vitamin B2) deficiency and gave him half a dozen B50 complex vitamins.

Read More »

True Story: Doctor Says “Don’t Eat Wheat Ever Again”

 

gluten free challah bread

Gluten Free Homemade Challah Bread

This is a quote that a lot of people are hearing these days. What happens after your doctor says these words? Here is a synopsis of my journey; if any of this sounds familiar, give it some serious thought…there may be a very simple answer.

I first heard these words while I was barely concious, in a bed at Methodist Hospital in Houston. I had become so weak and debilitated by my undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease that my life was in danger. The symptoms over twenty years included gastrointestinal problems, fibromyalgia, irritability, bone pain and more. The good news was that I finally found out what was wrong with me; the better news was finding out that the disease is completely manageable through dietary changes alone.–no medications, no surgeries, none of that stuff. Just don’t eat grains that contain the gluten protein, mainly wheat, barley and rye. That sounded really good to me.

Not so fast. While still in the hospital, I was really still very sick, and not really able to process the information. After a couple of days (in which I was already improving), it dawned on me that Read More »

How to Discover Seemingly Unrelated Symptoms Are Connected

Celiac Disease is sometimes referred to as having a cascading effect where symptoms beget symptoms and the health worsens and worsens.

This video shows how you can discover multiple symptoms are in fact related, when your doctor or doctors may be treating them as separate issues with different causes.

It also demonstrates how important it is to know the true cause of your symptoms.

Subscribe to the Gluten Free Works Treatment Guide to learn more about your symptoms and fix them.

Brain Symptoms in Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity

Frontal lobe - Human brain in x-ray view

There are 36 Brain Disorders Cause by Gluten Sensitivity and Celiac Disease listed in the Gluten Free Works Treatment Guide.

How they are caused and treatment are presented. The people who follow the steps provided in the Treatment Guide DO recover…which is SO AWESOME TO SEE!!! :)

It’s all right here. Everything you need to fix yourself and maintain your health, and your brain.

Read more. >>> Gluten Free Works Treatment Guide: Symptoms Affecting the Brain

Using the Treatment Guide Worksheet to Work With Your Doctor and Improve Your Treatment

Good communication with our healthcare providers is crucial.

We want to present our doctors with enough information to come to the correct diagnosis and treatment.

It is kind of like the difference between an essay question and a multiple choice question on a test.

If the options are all listed, coming up with the right answer is much easier.

Given that doctors only have a few minutes with us, this can be the difference between a quick recovery or ineffective treatment.

The Gluten Free Works Treatment Guide includes a worksheet on each symptom entry for you to complete and bring with you to the doctor.

Here is how it works!

Find out more about the Gluten Free Works Treatment Guide here

Connecting the Dots Between Underlying Causes and Symptoms – Apathy, Magnesium, Thiamin

Symptoms and health problems all have a cause. (Don’t believe it if someone tells you different, no matter what letters they might have behind their name.)

Cleo and John Libonati discuss why discovering the underlying causes is crucially important to wellness. Cleo explains how something as simple as Magnesium deficiency can cause other nutrient deficiencies and lead to a host of health issues.

http://youtu.be/HUrV9H-Mq4E?hd=1

Ready to get healthy? REALLY healthy?

Identify your underlying causes of health issues, fix your symptoms and get well with the Gluten Free Works Treatment Guide. Discover more here.

Can Bread Give You Herpes?

Gluten in bread can wreak havoc on the body. (AP Photo/S Ilic)

If you’re sensitive to gluten, a protein found in wheat, and foods made from wheat, it can make you more susceptible to herpes. Herpes, a virus that forms blisters on the skin, mouth and genitals causes what are called cold sores or fever blisters. It is highly contagious and may keep coming back, causing repetitive infections. Read More »

Interview with Gina Meagher: Living with Type I Diabetes and Celiac Disease

Gina Meagher Celiac Disease DiabetesI met Gina through the Celiac Sprue Association, Denver Chapter 17.  She helped me get involved in volunteering at last years ‘Incredible Edible Gluten-Free Food Fair™!’  She has been part of CSA for several years and is a member of the Board.  She has a lively personality and is willing to share her thoughts with others.  I am so excited that she was willing to sit down with me and talk about her experiences of living with Type I diabetes and Celiac disease.  I hope you enjoy this as much as I did.  The overall message I took away, was that neither Diabetes nor Celiac disease define who Gina is, because she is so much more and has never let either one stop her from living the active life she was meant to have!

Interview

 

Jenn: Hi Gina! It’s great to be with you today and to have the opportunity to get to know you better.  So, tell me…how old were you when you were diagnosed with Type I diabetes?

Gina: I was 17 years old.

Jenn: And how old were you when you were diagnosed with Celiac disease? Read More »

Tips for Overcoming Social Anxiety

1. Validate your emotional experience. Don’t tell youself that you shouldn’t feel the way you do or that how you feel is stupid.  Talking negatively to yourself will only increase your anxiety because negative self talk is not effective in changing emotions.  Say to yourself, “It’s okay that I’m nervous.  It makes sense.  Despite that, I can do this!” Approaching, not avoiding is what helps us deal with intense negative emotions.  It helps us learn that despite their presence, they are Read More »

Anxiety and Celiac Disease, Causes and Response to a Gluten Free Diet

“An estimated 40 million adult Americans suffer from anxiety disorder.” (1) These 40 million people total 18.1 percent of the United States that are at least 18 or over. (2)

According to “Recognizing Celiac Disease” anxiety is common in people with celiac disease and may be the only manifestation. Celiac disease patients showed high levels of state anxiety in a significantly higher percentage compared to controls – 71.4% vs. 23.7%.(3)

Chronic maladaptive anxiety is characterized by vague uneasiness or unpleasant feeling of apprehension and dysfunction. It is marked by anticipation of danger and interference with normal functioning, ranging from mild qualms and easy startling to occasional panic, often with headaches and fatigue. Deficiency of amino acids and vitamins implicate reduction of synthesis of neurotransmitters in the central nervous system and could be linked to immunological disregulation in celiac disease patients. Anxiety itself causes depletion of vitamins and minerals. Deficient nutrients could be B vitamins, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, tryptophan.(3)

A medical study evaluating bloodflow in the brain showed evidence of significant blood flow alteration in the brains of people with celiac disease who had only anxiety or depression neurological symptoms and were not on a gluten-free diet. Single photon computed tomography (SPECT) scan showed at least one hypoperfused brain region in 73% of untreated celiac disease patients compared to 7% of patients on a gluten-free diet and none in controls.(3)

Therefore, bloodflow in the brain and nutritional deficiencies play a large part in anxiety. If nutritional deficiencies are the source of the problem, then medications will be less effective requiring increasingly strong doses because the body and brain do not have what they need to utilize them.

The good news is that studies showed state anxiety improves and can usually disappear in people with celiac disease after withdrawal of gluten from the diet and improvement of nutrient status.

Consider celiac disease if you or someone you know has anxiety.

Related medical studies are referenced in “Recognizing Celiac Disease, by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN.”

Celiac disease is a multi-system, hereditary, chronic, auto-immune disease estimated to affect 1% of the human population (3 million in the US) that is caused by the ingestion of wheat, barley, rye and oats. It is treated by removing these items from the diet. Signs, symptoms, associated disorders and complications can affect any part of the body and removal of the offending foods can result in complete recovery.

“Recognizing Celiac Disease” is a reader-friendly reference manual written for both medical professionals and the general public that specifically answers the call from the National Institutes of Health for “better education of physicians, dietitians, nurses and other healthcare providers.” It has been endorsed by top medical professionals and professors at Harvard, Columbia, Jefferson and Temple Medical Schools as well as the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness and the Celiac Sprue Association – USA. “Recognizing Celiac Disease” is being hailed as the complete guide to recognizing, diagnosing and managing celiac disease and a must-have for physicians, dietitians, nutritionists, nurses, patients and anyone with an interest in this complex disorder.

Editor’s Note: Recognizing Celiac Disease has been expanded upon and converted into an online resource, The Gluten Free Works Treatment Guide.

Click here for more information.

Sources:

(1) ADAA Brief Overview. ww.adaa.org/GettingHelp/Briefoverview.asp
(2) Wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anxiety
(3) Libonati, Cleo. Recognizing Celiac Disease, Gluten Free Works Publishing, 2007.

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Author Information: John Libonati, Philadelphia, PA
Publisher, Glutenfreeworks.com.

Gluten Free Works Treatment Guide.
Editor & Publisher, Recognizing Celiac Disease.
John can be reached by e-mail here.