Tag Archives: Celiac disease

The History of Celiac Disease

220px-Samuel_Jones_Gee_1881[1]The earliest description of celiac disease was recorded in the second century A.D. In 1888 Samuel Gee published a monograph on celiac disease that “to regulate the food is the main part of treatment … The allowance of farinaceous foods must be small … but if the patient can be cured at all, it must be by means of diet.”

In the early 1900’s a carbohydrate restricted diet was advocated where the only carbohydrates allowed were ripe bananas and rice. Then in the 1950’s Dr. W. K. Dicke published work reporting that celiac children improved dramatically during World War II when wheat, rye and Read More »

Three Ways Gluten Causes Mental Disorders

Gluten is implicated in dozens of mental disorders, directly and indirectly causing symptoms that affect the mind. Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN explains three ways gluten causes neurological problems.

The Gluten Free Works Health Guide includes over 30 mental disorders that stem from gluten sensitivity and/or celiac disease and gives you steps to correct them or limit their progression.

Three Probiotics You Need to Decrease Inflammation and Make Vitamins

Probiotics are friendly bacteria that live in our intestines. When our level of bad bacteria overbalance the good bacteria, we get a condition called dysbiosis.

The following video describes three probiotics that decrease inflammation and make certain vitamins we need for energy metabolism, mood and a number of other functions!

Who Needs a Gluten Test? Video by “Gluten Syndrome” Expert Dr. Rodney Ford Explains

Dr. Rodney Ford, pediatrician and author of The Gluten Syndrome, provides us with an excellent and easy-to-follow video that tells us how to know if we need a gluten test.

This short presentation explains which symptoms to look for and tells you the tests you need to to request to find out if gluten is making you sick.

Dr. Ford estimates up to one third of people with chronic diseases are being affected by gluten and sums up why people do not ask to be tested. “We are so used to being sick that we don’t know we’re sick.” People think they have always been this way, so they do not know to ask.

He then establishes a great litmus test to determine who should be tested – “People who are sick, tired or grumpy should be tested.”

 

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Study Finds 1 in 5 Children With Celiac Disease Sustain Intestinal Damage Even on a Gluten-Free Diet

baby-sleepingIn a new medical study, researchers from MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) and Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) were surprised to discover that nearly one in five children with celiac disease sustained persistent intestinal damage, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet.1

These findings are consistent with research in adults, which showed that more than 33 percent of adult patients on a gluten-free diet have persistent intestinal damage, despite a reduction of symptoms or the results of blood tests.

Current guidelines for pediatric celiac disease patients recommend a single biopsy at diagnosis and follow-up blood testing to monitor recovery of the intestinal mucosa. It was assumed that intestinal mucosa (lining) healed in children after adopting a strict gluten-free diet and that the blood tests would accurately reflect whether healing was occurring or not. It appears this assumption was Read More »


  1. http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161130/Study-finds-1-in-5-pediatric-celiac-disease-patients-on-gluten-free-diet-sustain-persistent-intestinal-damage.aspx 

Helping a West Point Graduate Connect the Dots Between Symptoms and Their Causes

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My mother, Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN was giving a presentation to medical school students at a major medical school in Philadelphia. The topic was “Identifying and Correcting Nutrient Deficiencies in Celiac Disease.”

A student approached her after the presentation. She was a tall, athletic looking woman with short blond hair. She introduced herself as Amanda and told Cleo she was afraid she might have to drop out of medical school. She said she was a West Point graduate, but no one could diagnose her.

She said she had constant gastrointestinal problems and fatigue. She couldn’t concentrate. Something was terribly wrong. She could feel it. Read More »

University Finds Gluten-Free Diet Can Lead to Lower Cholesterol and More Fiber

The Go Gluten-Free study assessed the affects of a gluten-free diet on digestive health and fatigue in healthy people, without celiac disease. This was the largest study of its kind in the United Kingdom. Participants ate a gluten-free diet for three weeks and then went back to their regular diet.

The independent research was performed by Rowett Institution of Nutrition and Health at Aberdeen University. The results refute the claims made by many that the gluten-free diet is deficient in nutrients or in some way “bad” for people without celiac disease. In fact, these participants ate better, felt better and experienced decreased cholesterol levels, decreased salt, increased energy levels, clearer thinking and increased fiber contents of their meals.

Most People Do Not Realize How Sick They Really Are 

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We are told the gluten-free diet is the only treatment for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. We follow the diet, but do not recover fully. Many times, because we feel better than before, we do not grasp that we can be so much healthier than we are.
 
There are a host of health issues that can and should be treated through diet, supplements and medications, reducing inflammation and correcting deficiencies. Hundreds in fact.
 
Many times, we are told our symptoms are just who we are. And we accept that, because we don’t know any better.
 
Even our doctors have no idea that their patients who suffer from fatigue, thinning hair, flaking fingernails, poor vision, constant irritability, forgetfulness, mottled skin and hundreds of problems that they believe are “normal” day-to-day conditions actually result from Read More »

Celiac Disease Fact: Celiac Disease Tests are NOT Pass or Fail

This is a Celiac Disease Awareness Month Public Service Announcement.

Many people, including doctors, believe that the blood tests for celiac disease are pass/fail, and that if you have a negative result you can never in the future have a positive result. This is wrong. See how all the celiac disease tests work on our Diagnosis page.

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This message was brought to you by our  Gluten Free Extravaganza sponsors, Kay’s Naturals, Better BatterBard’s Beer and Uncle Steve’s Italian Specialties!

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