Celiac disease

Are Your Vitamins Making You Sick?

 

Photo courtesy of Joe Brentin

Sometimes gluten can appear in strange places; places you’d never expect. When you’re diagnosed with Celiac Disease, or gluten-intolerance, it’s up to you to make sure your toothpaste, the ketchup bottle in your fridge, and even your vitamins don’t contain anything that can make you sick.

Some of these products may surprise you. For example, most people wouldn’t suspect their vitamins contained gluten when in fact gluten is a common ingredient in Read More »

Avaxia Biologics Awarded Patent for Celiac Disease Treatment Pill

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

LEXINGTON,  Mass., Dec. 13, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — Avaxia Biologics, Inc., a privately-held biotech company developing oral antibody drugs that act locally within the gastrointestinal tract, announced today that the company was awarded U.S. Patent 8,071,101, “Antibody Therapy for Treatment of Diseases Associated With Gluten Intolerance.”

This patent, which expires on May 27, 2029, provides broad coverage for treating celiac disease using Read More »

Be Healthier in 2010 with Celiac Disease Manual: Save $10.00 Until Jan 8th

recognizing_celiac_disease_website_cover_132x162Libonati_John_Philadelphia_PA

Gluten Free Works Publishing is helping people with celiac disease kick off a healthier 2010 by offering a $10.00 discount on the highly recommended celiac disease manual, “Recognizing Celiac Disease,” now through January 8th.

Recognizing Celiac Disease” is the ready celiac reference that thousands of people are using to get well and stay healthy.

“Recognizing Celiac Disease” lists over 300 symptoms of celiac disease and the nutrient deficiencies that cause them both before and after diagnosis. This comprehensive reference will help you understand gluten sensitivity, celiac disease, nutrient deficiencies and how they are affecting you so you can correct them and heal.

Doctors, dietitians, marines, chefs, hairdressers and celiac support groups across the country are using this invaluable tool. You can find dozens of reader letters on the Recognizing Celiac Disease website. Some are touching, some are amazing, but all of them rave about this fantastic resource and the information it gave them that helped them get better and monitor their health.

The list of experts from the most prestigious medical institutions who recommend the work is truly impressive. You can see them here.

“This masterful, comprehensive and easy-to-use resource guide will go a long way in helping folks restore their health and regain their lives, a goal we share. Recognizing Celiac Disease has a permanent place on my desk and I definitely will recommend this well-researched reference manual to healthcare professionals and patients alike.”

-Alice Bast, Founder and Executive Director,
National Foundation for Celiac Awareness

Take advantage of this limited time offer and get your own copy now. You will be happy you did…

Click here for more information and to order Recognizing Celiac Disease.

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“Author Information: John Libonati, Philadelphia, PA
Publisher, Glutenfreeworks.com.
Editor & Publisher, Recognizing Celiac Disease.
John can be reached at john.libonati@glutenfreeworks.com.”

BioLineRx Announces Publication of Pre-clinical Results Demonstrating Efficacy of BL-7010, an Oral Treatment for Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity

Kelly Clayton Gluten Free Works

Just last week BioLineRx, a biopharmaceutical development company announced successful pre-clinical testing of a potentially revolutionary treatment for celiac disease.  This new treatment may help celiac disease patients reduce their gluten toxins to create an overall healthy body for all celiac disease patients.

Jerusalem, Israel – February 21, 2012 – BioLineRx (NASDAQ: BLRX; TASE: BLRX), a biopharmaceutical development company, announced the publication of pre-clinical results demonstrating that BL-7010, an orally available treatment for celiac disease, reduces gluten toxicity (the negative effect of gluten on the patient’s body). The research was published in the February edition of Gastroenterology.

The findings indicate that BL-7010 (previously called P(HEMA-co-SS)) reduces digestion of wheat gluten, thereby decreasing its Read More »

BioLineRX’s BL-7010 Treatment of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity Presented

biolinerx celiac disease therapy

BioLineRx Therapy BL – 7010 Treats Celiac Disease & Gluten Sensitivity

BioLineRx Ltd, a biopharmaceutical development company, was invited to deliver an oral presentation at the recent 2013 National Education Conference & Gluten-Free Expo, the Celiac Disease Foundation’s annual conference, in Pasadena, California.

Leah Klapper, Ph.D., General Manager, BioLine Innovations Jerusalem, presented BioLineRx’s therapy, BL-7010, for the treatment of celiac, as part of a session entitled Breaking Therapies Beyond the Gluten-Free Diet.

BL-7010 will be presented at Read More »

Bleeding Complications (Bruising or Hematoma) as First Sign of Celiac Disease

Editors’ note: This case report illustrates that a person can live a long time reporting apparent good health and be completely unaware that they have symptoms of celiac disease. In this case, hematomas, (which are swollen black and blue marks caused by a break in the wall of a blood vessel), that developed on his legs caused the patient to seek medical attention. The ability of his blood to clot was severely impaired and yet there was no other manifestation of hemorrhage. Discover more about bruising and hundreds of other health issues and how to treat them at the Gluten Free Works Health Guide.

Read More »

Bone Mineral Density and Celiac Disease in Women

The article below describes a study showing if a woman enters menopause with a low bone mineral density, the risk is 25% to develop fractures compared to 9% who had normal bone mineral density. This is a significant and important reason for women with celiac disease to: 

1) Keep a strict gluten-free diet to be able to absorb calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients vital to bone health,  

2) Influence disinterested relatives to get tested, and 

3) Get a baseline bone mineral density (BMD) test with follow-up for the appropriate supplementation.

Bone Density Tests Do Predict Women’s Fracture Risk
Largest, longest study ever supports screening and prevention of osteoporosis

By Amanda GardnerPosted 12/18/07

TUESDAY, Dec. 18 (HealthDay News) — One bone mineral density test can accurately predict a woman’s chance of spinal fractures 15 years down the line, new research shows.

And, according to the largest and longest prospective study of osteoporosis ever, women who had a spinal fracture at the beginning of the study had four times the risk of sustaining another fracture later on.

The bottom line: “Women need to talk to their doctors about the risk of osteoporosis,” according to Jane Cauley, lead author of the study and professor of epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

Her team published the findings in the Dec. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

“I agree with the guidelines that all women after the age of 65 have bone density tests, and Medicare will pay for that,” Cauley said. “Women who are postmenopausal, 50 to 64 years of age, should consider having a bone density test if they have other risk factors for osteoporosis or if they want to know what their bone density is before they consider any other treatment.”

The findings don’t change current standard practice, experts said, and they don’t change the basic message to women: Don’t ignore bone health, especially in middle and old age.

“The only really major advance here is that it’s a longer term study. Mostly studies are five years typically. This one went out 15 years,” said Paul Brandt, associate professor of neuroscience and experimental therapeutics at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine in College Station. “Women need to get their bone mineral density tested after they start menopause and if they stay on hormone replacement therapy or an anti-osteoporotic treatment.” he said.

Postmenopausal women are particularly vulnerable to fractures resulting from osteoporosis, a degenerative weakening of the bones. Some 10 million Americans, including one in five American women over the age of 50, suffer from osteoporosis, which is the most common type of bone disease.

Spinal fractures are the most common type of fracture resulting from osteoporosis, affecting 35 percent to 50 percent of women over 50 (about 700,000 vertebral fractures annually in the

United States).
But many, if not most, of these fractures go undetected. “Osteoporosis is sometimes called the silent thief,” Cauley said. “It basically robs the skeleton of strength and resources, and women don’t really know about it. About 75 percent of all spine fractures actually occur silently.”

“Identifying risk factors for spine fractures is less well developed. You have to systematically look for them by repeated X-rays,” Cauley continued.

The findings from this study are based on bone mineral density data from 2,300 women over the age of 65 who enrolled in the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF), initiated in 1986.

After 15 years of follow-up, it was evident that 25 percent of women who had low BMD at the beginning of the study developed fractures of the spine, compared with only 9 percent of women with normal BMD.

“It was pretty much a strong gradient of risk,” Cauley explained. “If you had normal bone density when you entered and did not have an [existing] fracture, the risk of having a new spine fracture was about 9 percent, compared to a risk of 56 percent in women who had osteoporosis and who had an existing fracture. So, the range of risk varied dramatically depending on bone density and previous spine fractures.”

According to Brandt, one interesting finding from the study is that a previous vertebral fracture topped even bone mineral density as a predictor for future fracture.

This indicates that women with an existing vertebral fracture should be treated for osteoporosis regardless of their BMD, the authors reported.

“People think osteoporosis is an inevitable consequence of aging, but it is preventable and treatable,” she said.

More information There’s more on age-linked bone loss at the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Copyright © 2007 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.                  

Boston College Business School Team Seeks Special Dietary Needs Information

A team of business school students from Boston College invites the gluten-free community to participate in an important market research survey. The goal is to learn more about consumers with specific dietary needs. The results of the survey will be used to assist in offering detailed recommendations about how to better support the community with unique, high-quality, gluten-free foods. This survey is intended for market research purposes only. Your opinion will be kept confidential. All results will be reported in the aggregate and not as individual entries. Read More »

Bovine Beta Casein Enteropathy Causes Villous Atrophy & Anemia

cow

The following questions concern whether villous atrophy can be caused by milk and whether anemia can result from milk ingestion. The answer is yes: bovine beta casein enteropathy can cause both. See full explanation below.

Question:Does anyone know can a deficiency in lactase enzyme cause the villi to be blunted? My 3 year old son just had an endoscopy and it showed the villi are blunted.

My son has a lactase deficiency and has been gluten free for 18 months. We took him off lactose for the first 6 months after being diagnosed but then added it back and he seemed fine for 6 months.

So I am hoping maybe the fact that he was drinking a lot of milk caused the villi to be blunted and not ingesting any gluten?

Also, can that cause anemia?

My son is also slightly anemic. But we are very strict with his diet and I am pretty sure he is not getting any gluten ( i know its possible but I don’t think so… his diet hasn’t changed..)

Celiac antibody blood tests indicate he is not getting gluten?

So i am wondering if the lactose could be causing the villi to be blunted and the anemia???

Thanks,
S

Answer:
Dear S,

The most common cause of villous atrophy in people with celiac disease is unintentional gluten ingestion. This answer assumes no gluten is being ingested.

Cow dairy can cause an enteropathy similar to celiac disease. It is called Bovine Beta Casein Enteropathy. It acts like celiac disease, causing inflammation leading to villous blunting. The milk protein elicits the antibody reaction just like gluten does in celiac disease.

The resulting villous blunting would explain lactose intolerance, as the lactase enzymes needed to digest lactose are produced and release near the tips of the villi. If the villi are blunted, no lactase is being produced and milke digestion does not occur.

Bovine beta casein enteropathy is marked by diarrhea, failure to thrive, vomiting, atopic eczema and recurrent respiratory infections. It causes malabsorption of nutrients, just like celiac disease, so it can lead to nutrient deficiencies including anemia. 12% of those with bovine beta casein enteropathy are found to have celiac disease.

-John Libonati

Source: Gluten Free Works Health Guide: Bovine Beta Casein Enteropathy.

Brain Symptoms in Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity

Frontal lobe - Human brain in x-ray view

There are 36 Brain Disorders Cause by Gluten Sensitivity and Celiac Disease listed in the Gluten Free Works Health Guide.

How they are caused and treatment are presented. The people who follow the steps provided in the Health Guide DO recover…which is SO AWESOME TO SEE!!! :)

It’s all right here. Everything you need to fix yourself and maintain your health, and your brain.

Read more. >>> Gluten Free Works Health Guide: Symptoms Affecting the Brain

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