Celiac disease

3rd Annual Greater Phoenix Gluten-free Expo – April 16, 2011

The Celiac Disease Foundation: Greater Phoenix Chapter will host its 3rd Annual Greater Phoenix Gluten-Free Expo on Saturday, April 16, 2011.  

This event is open to the public and gives people challenged with Celiac Disease, or those interested in transitioning to a gluten-free lifestyle, an opportunity to learn more about gluten-free products and where to purchase those products, as well as learning about local restaurants offering gluten-free menus.  In 2010, over 600 attendees and 37 vendors participated in the expo. This year promises to be even bigger, with an expected 800 guests and 50 vendors.

The expo will be held between 10 am and 2 pm at the following location:

Sheraton Crescent Hotel
2620 West Dunlap Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85021

In keeping with the intent of sharing information on a wide array of products now available to the gluten-free community, a variety Read More »

A G-Free Thanksgiving

It takes a little planning ahead to guarantee a great Thanksgiving. In many ways, it’s easier if you’re hosting, because you know what you can and can’t have. Most people hate to impose on their hosts, but it’s easier on you AND your host to ask beforehand than sit through a four-hour meal and watch others eat. Remember, nothing is more important that staying safe!

Turkey:
Though it’s always good to check, the good news is that all plain fresh turkey is naturally gluten free. However, self-basting turkeys usually contain gluten. Most gravy packets are a problem, too. As of 2011, ALL of the companies I called did have gluten-free turkeys, except Tofurky, which has gluten. Check out my gluten-free turkey list for 2011, which has manufacturer contact info.

If you’re not hosting Thanksgiving at your house, talk to your host as soon as you can. You’ll need to talk about:

* Broth used for basting
* Seasonings
* Stuffing in the Read More »

A great informative Harvard Health Publication on gluten

Hey guys! I just found a great health email I think all those interested in the particulars of health and current research would be really interested in. 

Harvard Health Publications

In particular, there is a great, informative and interesting article on the rise of gluten sensitivities and Celiac disease. You might have to sign up for the email newsletter to see it, but I think it’s worth it. 

The article goes into detail on various elements concerning gluten digestive issues such as; understanding what happens within the body in regards to gluten absorption, common and uncommon symptoms, testing to diagnose Celiac, and the “Super Six”, explained further in the quote below:  Read More »

Adding a Gluten-Free Product to My Arsenal

I have been gluten-free for almost four years, so I think it’s safe to say that I know my way around the gluten-free aisle at the grocery store. I also feel like I have a pretty good handle on what brands are worth buying, which products are best for certain recipes, and what my taste-buds like in general. But, I recently found that even I can benefit from the discovery aspect that the Taste Guru box-of-the-month provides.mezzetta-300x300 Read More »

Alaska Passes Celiac Awareness Month Resolution

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

It is wonderful to see individual states supporting celiac disease awareness. This April, Alaska became the latest to pass a resolution recognizing May as Celiac Awareness Month. Governor Sean Parnell and Senator Cathy Giessel are applauded for their efforts to advance celiac disease awareness. 

alaska celiac awareness month

Gov. Parnell & Sen. Giessel with the Celiac Awareness Month Resolution

(Juneau) – A resolution to proclaim May 2012 as Celiac Disease Awareness Month, SCR 16, was signed by the governor, Sean Parnell, today.

Sen. Cathy Giessel, R-Anchorage, an advanced nurse practitioner, sponsored SCR 16 after being approached by a constituent of hers, Brandy Wendler, also a nurse practitioner, who was diagnosed 4 years ago. Together, they wanted to bring greater public awareness to a disease that is much more common than many realize, and often goes undiagnosed. Mrs. Wendler reported, “Statistics tell us that 1 in 133 people have Celiac Disease, which is three million Americans, yet 97% of them do not know it.” May is also Read More »

Alba Therapeutics Announces Enrollment of Its First European Patient in Global Phase IIb Study

 

PRESS RELEASE
Milestone Marks the First Time a European Patient with Active Celiac Disease has Enrolled in a Clinical Trial for an Investigational Medication from Alba Therapeutics
Last update: 8:22 p.m. EST Nov. 11, 2008
BALTIMORE, Nov 11, 2008 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ —

Alba Therapeutics Corporation announced today that for the first time, a European patient with active celiac disease has been enrolled in its clinical trial to investigate a treatment for the disease. Alba has enrolled and randomized the newly diagnosed patient from Spain in an eight-week Phase IIb trial with oral larazotide acetate, a tight junction regulator, for the treatment of patients with active celiac disease (CD). The global multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study will evaluate the clinical and histological efficacy, safety and tolerability of larazotide acetate in 106 active CD subjects adhering to a gluten-free diet, while assessing improvement in the clinical signs and symptoms of celiac disease.

“These are decisive times for our desire to one day be able to offer our celiac patients a treatment that allows them to live more normal lives,” said Dr. Gemma Castillejo, MD, a pediatric gastroenterologist and principal investigator in the study. Dr. Castillejo, a leading European celiac expert from the Sant Joan de Reus University Hospital in Reus, Spain added, “I believe this clinical trial has the potential to be a turning point in the search for treatments for celiac disease.”
“This is a major milestone for the celiac community in Europe,” stated Francisco Leon, MD, PhD, Vice President, Clinical Development and Medical Affairs of Alba. “This is Alba’s sixth human trial with larazotide acetate, and we are excited to be advancing our investigational program for larazotide acetate in this important region of the world.”
About Celiac Disease
Celiac disease is an inherited autoimmune disorder where gluten has been identified as the environmental trigger of the disease. Gluten is an ingested protein found in wheat, barley and rye. Gluten is broken down into gliadin which can pass through the intestinal epithelial barrier during times of increased intestinal permeability. The ingestion of gluten causes an immune response which triggers an inflammatory reaction in the small intestine. This then causes damage to the villi in the small intestine and can lead to total villous atrophy in celiac disease. This results in varying symptoms such as fatigue, skin rash, anemia, fertility issues, joint pain, weight loss, pale sores inside the mouth, tooth discoloration or loss of enamel, depression, chronic diarrhea or constipation, gas and abdominal pain. The immunology and nutritional abnormalities in celiac disease can potentially result in long- term complications such as osteoporosis, refractory sprue, small intestinal cancer, and lymphoma.
Celiac disease is a growing public health concern, affecting approximately 3 million people in the United States and over 6.5 million people worldwide. The only current management of celiac disease is complete elimination of gluten from the diet, which can be very difficult to implement in practice. Additionally, the response to the gluten-free diet is poor in up to 30% of patients, and dietary nonadherence is the chief cause of persistent or recurrent symptoms.(1)
(1) Green, P, and Cellier, C, Review Article,
 Medical Progress, Celiac Disease, N ENGL J MED
 2007;357:1731-43
About “Larazotide Acetate”
Larazotide acetate is an experimental medicine and a tight junction regulator that acts locally by inhibiting the opening of tight junctions in epithelial cells lining the small intestine. In celiac disease, gluten crosses the epithelial barrier and stimulates the immune system, leading to cytokine release, gut inflammation, and opening of tight junctions. This leads to increased paracellular permeability, increased entry of gluten and the establishment of an intestinal permeability-inflammation loop. Larazotide acetate inhibits tight junction opening triggered by both gluten and inflammatory cytokines, thus reducing uptake of gluten. Larazotide acetate disrupts the intestinal permeability-inflammation loop, and reduces symptoms associated with celiac disease. Larazotide acetate is orally formulated, has been granted “Fast Track” designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of celiac disease, and is also being evaluated for the treatment of Crohn’s Disease.

For more information about Alba’s clinical trials, please visit the www.clinicaltrials.gov web site and search for Alba Therapeutics.

About Alba
Alba Therapeutics Corporation is a privately held, clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development, and commercialization of therapies to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and is located in Baltimore, Maryland. Alba’s technology platform is based upon a key pathway that regulates the assembly and disassembly of tight junctions in cell barriers throughout the body. As a result of its unique technology platform, Alba is a leader in mucosal biology and has developed a pipeline of innovative therapeutic candidates that has the potential to modify the course of disease and significantly improve upon existing treatments for a wide range of diseases such as celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, and Asthma/COPD or acute lung injury.
    Media: Mariesa Kemble
    Sam Brown Communications
    608-850-4745
    kemblem@aol.com 

    Corporate: Wendy Perrow, MBA
    Alba Therapeutics Corporation
    410-878-9850
    info@albatherapeutics.com
    http://www.albatherapeutics.com
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Author Information: John Libonati, Philadelphia, PA
Publisher, Glutenfreeworks.com.
Editor & Publisher, Recognizing Celiac Disease.
John can be reached by e-mail here.

Allergen Detection Service Dogs…Until There’s a Cure! Interview with Ciara Gavin

Allergen Detection Service DogsI was recently connected with Ciara Gavin of Allergen Detection Service Dogs in a joint effort to work together to increase Food Allergy Awareness by holding a conference in Colorado Springs.  While that whole idea is still in the works, I was immediately intrigued by the work being done by Ciara and her team.  I needed to know more!  Lucky for me, she agreed to come to Denver and meet over lunch to discuss the work we both do.  I am honored to share with all of you the amazing services being provided through Allergen Detection Service Dogs!

allergen detection service dogs

Allergendetectionservicedogs.com

First, I have to say that I was lucky enough to meet one of these amazing dogs named Tucker, who is actually a mobility dog, and has a unique set of skills outside of allergen detection.  However, he was in the restaurant with us and was well received, well behaved, and an all around incredible animal.  I was hooked from Read More »

Americans Spend Over $25 Billion Each Year on 8 Pharmaceutical Drugs That Deplete Nutrients

 

Lipitor raked in more than $5 billion for pharmaceutical giant, Pfizer Inc., during 2009 according to Drugs.com

Nexium Depletes Nutrients

Are drugs making you sick?

Sales of the 5 leading drugs for mental disorders topped $12,750,023,000, while Nexium and Prevacid totaled 7,523,382,000.

All eight of these drugs deplete nutrients. 

 

Revenues of the Top 8 Selling Drugs of 2009

Lipitor: lowers cholesterol – $5,363,193,000

Nexium: acid reducer – $5,014,827,000

Prevacid: acid reducer – $2,508,555,000

Seroquel: antipsychotic – $3,117,591,000 Read More »

Anxiety and Celiac Disease, Causes and Response to a Gluten Free Diet

“An estimated 40 million adult Americans suffer from anxiety disorder.” (1) These 40 million people total 18.1 percent of the United States that are at least 18 or over. (2)

According to “Recognizing Celiac Disease” anxiety is common in people with celiac disease and may be the only manifestation. Celiac disease patients showed high levels of state anxiety in a significantly higher percentage compared to controls – 71.4% vs. 23.7%.(3)

Chronic maladaptive anxiety is characterized by vague uneasiness or unpleasant feeling of apprehension and dysfunction. It is marked by anticipation of danger and interference with normal functioning, ranging from mild qualms and easy startling to occasional panic, often with headaches and fatigue. Deficiency of amino acids and vitamins implicate reduction of synthesis of neurotransmitters in the central nervous system and could be linked to immunological disregulation in celiac disease patients. Anxiety itself causes depletion of vitamins and minerals. Deficient nutrients could be B vitamins, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, tryptophan.(3)

A medical study evaluating bloodflow in the brain showed evidence of significant blood flow alteration in the brains of people with celiac disease who had only anxiety or depression neurological symptoms and were not on a gluten-free diet. Single photon computed tomography (SPECT) scan showed at least one hypoperfused brain region in 73% of untreated celiac disease patients compared to 7% of patients on a gluten-free diet and none in controls.(3)

Therefore, bloodflow in the brain and nutritional deficiencies play a large part in anxiety. If nutritional deficiencies are the source of the problem, then medications will be less effective requiring increasingly strong doses because the body and brain do not have what they need to utilize them.

The good news is that studies showed state anxiety improves and can usually disappear in people with celiac disease after withdrawal of gluten from the diet and improvement of nutrient status.

Consider celiac disease if you or someone you know has anxiety.

Related medical studies are referenced in “Recognizing Celiac Disease.”

Celiac disease is a multi-system, hereditary, chronic, auto-immune disease estimated to affect 1% of the human population (3 million in the US) that is caused by the ingestion of wheat, barley, rye and oats. It is treated by removing these items from the diet. Signs, symptoms, associated disorders and complications can affect any part of the body and removal of the offending foods can result in complete recovery.

“Recognizing Celiac Disease” is a reader-friendly reference manual written for both medical professionals and the general public that specifically answers the call from the National Institutes of Health for “better education of physicians, dietitians, nurses and other healthcare providers.” It has been endorsed by top medical professionals for anxiety buy http://rxleader.com/product/prozac/ online pharmacy and professors at Harvard, Columbia, Jefferson and Temple Medical Schools as well as the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness and the Celiac Sprue Association – USA. “Recognizing Celiac Disease” is being hailed as the complete guide to recognizing, diagnosing and managing celiac disease and a must-have for physicians, dietitians, nutritionists, nurses, patients and anyone with an interest in this complex disorder.

Click here for more information.

Sources:

(1) ADAA Brief Overview. ww.adaa.org/GettingHelp/Briefoverview.asp
(2) Wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anxiety
(3) Libonati, Cleo. Recognizing Celiac Disease, Gluten Free Works Publishing, 2007. http://www.recognizingceliacdisease.com

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Author Information: John Libonati, Philadelphia, PA
Publisher, Glutenfreeworks.com.
Editor & Publisher, Recognizing Celiac Disease.
John can be reached by e-mail here.

Apple Spice Hummus: Dessert Hummus with a Healthful Edge

I recently attended a gluten, dairy, and soy-free cooking class at Williams-Sonoma at The Forum in Norcross. All of the recipes we sampled were quite tasty, but the Apple Spice Hummus was ‘smack you lips’ fantastic. I have never had what I deem to be dessert hummus before and one that was also healthful, so I just had to share. Read More »

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