Celiac disease

I Got Glutened and It’s My Own Fault!

no glutenI sit here writing this post from my bed. It’s 9:39pm and I have been in bed since 4:30pm. My tonsils are so big it hurts to swallow and I feel like I have been in a boxing match where I lost, severely.

I used to get sick like this all the time before I was diagnosed with coeliac disease and I am starting this think that my immune system is a wreck again.

Why? Because I have been slack. Many of those out there with coeliac disease will think I am stupid. I am stupid.

You see at my current job we have staff cafe. Read More »

I Had a Dad bod. Then I Went Gluten Free

“I should look like Brad Pitt.”

Back before I went gluten free, I remember looking in the mirror and saying these exact words to myself.

I was working out 5 to 6 days a week, weight training and cardio, eating “right” but instead of looking good, I looked like a sausage…and it was getting worse.

Dad bod gluten free

Now, to be certain I didn’t go gluten free to lose weight, but because I had acid reflux, IBS, anxiety and a host of other problems.

When I asked, my doctor said I didn’t have celiac disease – without testing me.

I started a 100% strict gluten free diet anyway. As the inflammation decreased, I felt worlds better…and I lost weight. What I thought was fat had actually been retained fluid. 25 lbs of it. I haven’t had a dad bod in 12 years, and I don’t miss it a bit.

-John Libonati

Woohoo! Won my age division at a local 5K!

Woohoo! Won my age division at a local 5K! This was two months ago at 12 years GF!

I’m deficient, You’re deficient, We’re all deficient? (Part 1)

I was recently reading a press release from Nature’s Path Organic about two of their new cereals. The press release made a familiar argument: the cereals “provide gluten avoiders with whole grains… unlike many gluten-free cereals which forfeit nutritional benefits…” The implication is that many gluten-free cereals (and other gluten-free processed foods, by extension) are more highly processed in order to improve taste and texture. But they do so by sacrificing nutritional quality.

There is some truth to this logic. Foods made from whole grains are inherently healthier than heavily processed foods, and I’ll use our good old enemy – wheat – to demonstrate. I compared whole grain wheat flour (less processed) with white, unenriched wheat flour (more processed) across a range of nutrient measures. Not surprisingly, the wheat underwent a profound loss in Read More »

I’m deficient, You’re deficient, We’re all deficient? (Part 2)

In  Part 1 of this article about nutrient deficiencies in the gluten-free population, I posed four critiques and questions that I promised to answer in today’s part 2. Without further ado, here we go…

Critique #1 questioned the small sample size of the research. I can’t do anything about that, and there’s not much to be said about it, so let’s move on.

Next, I think it’s easiest to address critique #3: How did nutrient deficiencies in the gluten-free population compare to Americans as a whole? To answer that question, I pulled data regarding nationwide averages from the USDA’s Community Nutrition Mapping Project. If I amend yesterday’s table that showed the percent of the gluten-free population who are deficient in given nutrients, and add to it a column for the national averages, this is what you find:

 

Nutrient GF Deficiency Nationwide Deficiency
fiber 74% 92%
calcium 82% 69%
thiamin 59% 19%
riboflavin 25% 11%
B6 35% 26%
folate 85% 40%
B12 29% 20%
iron 41% 11%

 

These numbers change the perspective a bit, I think. It’s not simply that the gluten-free population is nutrient deficient. When you compare us to the national averages, it gets slightly more complex. In some cases, such as folate, riboflavin, thiamin, and iron, we’re two or more times as deficient (as a group) than the nation. However, in other cases, such as B12, B6, and calcium, we still have greater rates Read More »

IBS Guidelines Should Include Screening for Celiac Disease

Guidelines for the treatment of IBS published by the American College of Gastroenterology include screening for celiac disease. These guidelines were established in 2008.

New IBS Guidelines Offer Treatment Ideas

American College of Gastroenterology Updates Recommendations for Irritable Bowel Syndrome
By Bill Hendrick

WebMD Health NewsReviewed by Louise Chang, MDDec. 19, 2008 — New guidelines have been issued by the nation’s gastroenterologists that are aimed at easing the abdominal pain, diarrhea, and other symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which afflicts millions of Americans.

The guidelines, issued by the American College of Gastroenterology, also offer hope to patients who’ve struggled with the condition and found satisfactory treatments lacking. Read More »

If there was a ‘Magic’ Gluten-Free Pill

Gluten-eaters often ask me, “Don’t you wish there was some ‘magic’ pill?”

This question arises when I have limited choices on a menu, or have to pass the basket of bread without indulging. My response usually includes a “Not really”, with some type of short explanation on why my life doesn’t suck because I’m gluten-free.

If there was a magic pill that enabled you to eat gluten, would you use it?

I can honestly say that I don’t feel like I’m missing out. I am happy with my diet. Just because I can’t choose a roll from the gluten-filled bread basket, doesn’t mean my life has crumbled into ruins.

So if there was a pill, would I take it? If I had the ability to indulge in gluten-filled food with the comfort of knowing the so-called ‘magic’ pill would alleviate my symptoms as well as prevent the damage to my intestines, would I be poppin’ it back on the regular? Read More »

ImmunogenX Acquires Celiac Disease Therapy from Alvine Pharmaceuticals

Immunogenx-logo-lowx41[1]A therapy for celiac disease is one step closer. ImmunogenX purchased the license for Alvine Pharmaceuticals’ medicine, ALV003, which degrades gluten before it can be digested and absorbed by the intestines. The following press release was distributed by ImmunogenX.

“Glutenase for in-vivo gluten degradation is a leading candidate for celiac disease ImmunogenX™, a biopharmaceutical company focused on the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune and gastrointestinal diseases, today announced that it has completed the acquisition of the non-cash assets of Alvine Pharmaceuticals.

This includes Latiglutenase (formerly known as ALV003 and renamed IMGX003), an orally administered mixture of two recombinant gluten-specific proteases that degrades gluten proteins into small physiologically irrelevant fragments. The technology is backed by over 50 issued or pending patents, has been extensively studied in Phase I and Phase 2 clinical trials, and is the only CD treatment that has demonstrated histologic success as well as symptomatic improvements in Read More »

Infertility, Pre-term Birth and Miscarriage all Linked to Gluten Intolerance

Editor’s Note: The malabsorption resulting from undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease has been well documented in research, but is still little known among physicians. Our medical website, The Gluten Free Works Health Guide, contains male and female reproductive disorders and lists the nutritional deficiencies that cause each.

In a recent New York Times article, Can Foods Contribute To Infertility?, Dr. Sheila Crowe, a professor in the division of gastroenterology and hepatology in the department of medicine at the University of Virginia, brings to light a lesser-known contributor to infertility in both men and women: Celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA). Read More »

Innovate Biopharmaceuticals Completes License For Late-Stage Celiac Disease Asset From Alba Therapeutics

Alba_Logo[1]Alba Therapeutics has been working on a therapy for celiac disease the past 8 years. Alba’s therapy, Larazotide Acetate, is the first to reach phase 3 clinical trials, where it will be given to large groups of people.

When Alba first contacted us about helping to promote their phase 2 clinical trial, we investigated the therapy’s mechanism and were glad to see the drug is not absorbed into the body, but acts in the intestine to stop gluten from being absorbed. Better yet, it worked. We covered Larazote Acetate in our article, Medical Research Study to Test a Potential Celiac Disease Therapy Is Underway and Signing up Participants.

A real therapy for celiac disease is one step closer. Alba just sent us the following press release concerning their deal with Innovate Biopharmaceuticals to produce the therapy.  Read More »

Interview with Gina Meagher: Living with Type I Diabetes and Celiac Disease

Gina Meagher Celiac Disease DiabetesI met Gina through the Celiac Sprue Association, Denver Chapter 17.  She helped me get involved in volunteering at last years ‘Incredible Edible Gluten-Free Food Fair™!’  She has been part of CSA for several years and is a member of the Board.  She has a lively personality and is willing to share her thoughts with others.  I am so excited that she was willing to sit down with me and talk about her experiences of living with Type I diabetes and Celiac disease.  I hope you enjoy this as much as I did.  The overall message I took away, was that neither Diabetes nor Celiac disease define who Gina is, because she is so much more and has never let either one stop her from living the active life she was meant to have!

Interview

 

Jenn: Hi Gina! It’s great to be with you today and to have the opportunity to get to know you better.  So, tell me…how old were you when you were diagnosed with Type I diabetes?

Gina: I was 17 years old.

Jenn: And how old were you when you were diagnosed with Celiac disease? Read More »

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