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Old Fashioned Stomped Lemon-ade

This tangy, refreshing lemon-ade has stood the test of time not just for extracting loads of vitamin C from the rind, but for exceptional taste. Someone can always be found to do the stomping, especially children. Makes a quart. New wooden stompers can be easily bought, or have fun looking for the old, turned ones found at garage sales or flea markets.

Ingredients
  • 1 large fresh lemon
  • 1/2 cup Gluten Free Works fructose
  • 1 quart of fresh water
Equipment

A heavy glass pitcher and a wooden stomper.

Process
  1. Scrub the lemon with baking soda on a clean wet cloth.
  2. Rinse well then cut into thin slices.
  3. Toss the lemon slices into the pitcher with the fructose.
  4. Stomp a few minutes until the juice is rendered, but not so long as to mash the rinds.
  5. Stir, add ice cubes and enjoy!

Pancakes and Waffle Recipes

Gluten Free King Arthur Pancakeapple waffle recipe gluten free

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Pancakes

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Buckwheat Pancakes with Banana and Date Butter

Gluten-free Buckwheat Buttermilk Blueberry Pancakes Recipe

Gluten-Free Pumpkin Pancake Recipe Your Family Will Love!

Gluten-Free Nutty Buckwheat Pancakes

Gluten-Free Upside Down Apple Cinnamon Pancakes

Gluten-Free Apple Amaranth Pancakes

Gluten-Free Coconut Flour Pancakes

 

Waffles

Gluten Free Eggnog Waffle Recipe

Whip Up Some Gluten-free Waffles for Breakfast

Gluten Free Whole Grain Apple Waffle Recipe

 

Recognizing Celiac Disease – Your book is by far the best one we have found

Below is a recent message we received from someone who bought “Recognizing Celiac Disease.”

Thank you. My husband and I both have Celiac Disease and your book is by far the best one we have found in print on Celiac Disease. We love the format with the concise, current overview in the beginning and the detailed charts that make up most of the book. We refer to it on a regular basis as we research questions for ourselves, friends, family and others.

We shared your book with the head of the pathology dept. at our local hospital, our Celiac Disease support group members at our last meeting (and encouraged them all to purchase their own copies) and even with our dentist.

I wish there were a way to get your book to all of our local doctors since none of them are informed about Celiac Disease and few people are diagnosed in our area. My doctor had never dx’d a case of Celiac Disease before mine (I was on my deathbed 6 years ago), and our pediatrician has never dx’d a case!

I have proposed that our support group purchase books for all of our local gastroenterologists, providing you are not planning to publish an updated version in the near future.

If there is any way you recommend that our support group, or we personally, can promote your book please let us know.

Thank you again!

Suzanne Ludlam
Fairfax, VT

You can read more reviews Here!

Recognizing Celiac Disease at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

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April 22, 2009, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN presented “Celiac Disease Today” to a group of medical students at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Philadelphia, PA.

Libonati’s presentation was attended by first, second and third year students who had many questions about celiac disease symptoms and how to identify at-risk patients.

“It was very encouraging to see such an intense level of interest in celiac disease,” Libonati said afterward. “Specifically, these students wanted to know how they as doctors will see it, how they test for it and educational materials they could give to people with it.”

Student antendees received a complimentary copy of Recognizing Celiac Disease. Special thanks to Daniel Van Riper, president of the Nutrition Group for the invitation to speak and coordinating the event.

“Recognizing Celiac Disease” is the acclaimed guide to recognizing, diagnosing and managing celiac disease. Recommended by medical experts and national celiac disease support organizations, it is used by healthcare providers and patients in 15 countries.

For more information on Recognizing Celiac Disease, visit www.recognizingceliacdisease.com

Seasoned Gluten-Free Breakfast Hash Browns

 

 

Seasoned gluten-free hash brownsI grew up with small weekday breakfasts and large weekend breakfasts. We ate cereal during the week but on Saturday mornings we’d trek (usually by car, although it was extremely close to our house) to a very small, very local diner called Mama’s. Run by an eastern-European family, the diner made such extraordinary breakfasts that we became fast and regular patrons. Although the restaurant is long gone now, and the breakfasts are nothing more than a mere memory to me, I still fantasize about the humongous servings that lasted me much more than Read More »

The Vatican Did Not Steal Communion From Gluten-Free Catholics

A recent New York Times article with the title “Vatican Refuses to Go Gluten-Free at Communion” has caused quite a stir, with other news organizations quickly picking up the story and running similarly sensational headlines. Opinion leaders on social media jumped on the topic and word spread that gluten-free Catholics were being refused Communion.

I am not sure if this qualifies as “fake news,” but the headlines are definitely wrong.

According to the Catholic Church, Communion is the joining of the person to God by eating bread or wine that has been transfigured into the body and blood of Jesus Christ.

The New York Times and any other media outlet or individual who claims the Vatican is withholding gluten-free Communion from Catholics is factually incorrect. The Catholic Church offers multiple ways to receive Communion, and some are gluten-free.

In fact, all Catholic bishops have informed their parish priests that they must make Communion available to Catholic parishioners with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity in forms other than the regular bread hosts in order to meet their needs.

The Vatican simply published a statement reaffirming the position it previously stated in 2003 on the subject of gluten-free Communion. Hosts not made from wheat are invalid. So, what forms are gluten-free? Read More »

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