Tag Archives: Diet

Celiac Disease and Gluten Free Diet Educational Videos

Cheryl Harris Gluten Free Works

Finding out you have Celiac Disease is a big transition. Often it’s a good one that leads to feeling great, yet initially it’s a lot of information to take in at once to understand what you need to do for your health. Much of it is because we’re been eating one way for 15, 30, 50 or more years and it can be overwhelming to to instantly unlearn everything we’ve done and change overnight. Wouldn’t life be easier if you could take a doctor or dietitian home as a portable reminder of the basics? And so the Celiac Disease Video Project was born.

See below for videos of Dr. John Snyder, Chief of the Department of Gastroenterology at CNMC in DC, Dr. Gary Kaplan, Medical Director of Kaplan Center for Integrative Medicine and Cheryl Harris, MPH, RD Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist discussing testing, diagnosis and follow-up, eating a gluten-free diet and a short segment on when it’s not Celiac. Though there are an increasing number of videos out there on people’s stories of diagnosis and ways to make a gluten-free pie, this is the first of its kind to do a run-down of the medical and diet basics by healthcare professionals. The Celiac Sprue Association has been kind enough to support the project. Read More »

Step by Step Guide: Beginning the Gluten-Free Lifestyle

FOR THE NEWLY-DIAGNOSED CELIAC AND DH’er STEP-BY-STEP:  BEGINNING THE GLUTEN-FREE LIFESTYLE©

by Janet Y. Rinehart, Houston,  and Lynn Rainwater, San Antonio

BEGIN

A definite diagnosis of Celiac Disease (screening blood tests plus endoscopic biopsies) and/or Dermatitis Herpetiformis (skin biopsy) means a lifetime commitment to a gluten-free diet.

  • Take full advantage of your local chapter membership.  Our group leaders and contacts have experience with the gluten-free diet.  We can help you acclimate to the changes in your lifestyle. We welcome your questions.
  • Join national celiac support groups, for example: Read More »

University Finds Gluten-Free Diet Can Lead to Lower Cholesterol and More Fiber

The Go Gluten-Free study assessed the affects of a gluten-free diet on digestive health and fatigue in healthy people, without celiac disease. This was the largest study of its kind in the United Kingdom. Participants ate a gluten-free diet for three weeks and then went back to their regular diet.

The independent research was performed by Rowett Institution of Nutrition and Health at Aberdeen University. The results refute the claims made by many that the gluten-free diet is deficient in nutrients or in some way “bad” for people without celiac disease. In fact, these participants ate better, felt better and experienced decreased cholesterol levels, decreased salt, increased energy levels, clearer thinking and increased fiber contents of their meals.

Eating Gluten-Free? Are You Eating Enough Protein?

chick fil a nuggets gluten freeAccording to a recent Wall Street Journal article, The Gluten-Free Craze: Is It Healthy? (6/23/2014) — over 29% of people surveyed said they are cutting back gluten consumption or avoiding it completely.

Whether a gluten-free diet is a “craze” or fad for those not diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity is debatable. Important questions for anyone eating a restrictive diet — for whatever reason, should be, “am I eating a balanced diet? Am I eating optimal amounts of protein, healthy fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals for my individual needs?” Read More »

Gluten-Free Cooking for Kids – Plan Ahead and Keep it Simple – Tips for Cooking for Gluten-Free Kids

Photo by David Shankbone

Photo by David Shankbone

Cooking for children on gluten-free diets requires special planning and care to ensure that they are getting all the nutrients they need to grow and thrive. Replacing gluten-filled junk food with gluten-free junk food of course, isn’t good for kids.

Research shows that children with celiac disease are at higher risk for nutritional deficiencies. A variety of nutritious foods are vital to healthy growth and development.

Plan Ahead When Cooking for Gluten-Free Kids

Explain to your child what foods are safe for them to eat and what foods contain gluten and are off-limits. The depth of this discussion will depend on the age of your child- use visual aids if you need to in order to help your child understand the concept of safe and unsafe foods.
Read More »

My 14 tips for a HEALTHY 2014!

Can you believe 2014 is already upon us?! It’s crazy how fast time flies.
Each year since going gluten-free I’ve learned more and more about how to live a healthier life…and I wanted to share what I’ve learned this year with you! Here are my 14 tips for your healthiest year yet:
 
happy new year gluten free
 
 
1. Eat RAW veggies – EVERY DAY!
gluten free veggies
Raw vegetables are full of digestive enzymes, nutrients, and fiber our body needs to function at it’s best. Eat them daily and you’ll definitely reap the benefits.  Read More »

The Truth About Soy for a Gluten-Free Diet

Is soyglutenfreesafesoy safe and healthy if you’re gluten-free? Do you consider soy milk to be healthier than regular milk? Do you worry about GMO soy? Or perhaps you’re concerned about rumors of soy being dangerous and disruptive to your hormones?

These are all great questions I find myself answering often. Though I don’t believe the story on soy is quite as cut and dry as some out there (like those in the Paleo world), I firmly feel that those of us who are gluten-free for whatever the reason —be it celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, gluten intolerance, thyroid issues or autoimmune problems— have tremendous reason to be wary and skeptical of the notion that soy is a safe alternative to Read More »

Do Gluten Free People Eat Mostly Unprocessed or Processed Foods?

processed-vs-whole-nutrition-380x252Media “health experts” consistently stress the dangers of following a gluten-free diet if you are not medically diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. They ominously describe the “high sugar content” and “lack of vitamin and mineral fortification” of many gluten-free foods.

Besides ignoring the millions and millions of people in SouthEast Asia who live their entire lives gluten-free because wheat, barley, rye or oats are not part of their traditional diet, the reporters ignore unprocessed staples of the gluten-free diet: meats, dairy, vegetables, fruits, nuts, non-gluten grains like rice, beans, eggs and seafood. Unprocessed. You know, those foods that do not have to be fortified with synthetic supplements because they NATURALLY contain vitamins and minerals.

Without fail, the foods the medical contributors describe are processed  gluten-free foods.

Why??

Well, the ABC producer who once interviewed me admitted she had tried every diet to lose weight and knew absolutely nothing about nutrition. She mentioned the sweet potato diet worked best for her…although her skin turned orange.

Sigh. From my experience, here is how news reporting seems to work in TV news land.

Producers, under huge pressure to find something sensational every day, do the interviews and write the stories. They are not necessarily experts in the subject matter. The producer who interviewed me was off to cover a new type of car squeegee after my interview.

Medical contributors, grave looking urologists (urinary tract expert), dapper cardiologists (heart expert) or pretty nurses, then read the stories off a teleprompter, provide a few comments and frown or nod wisely at the appropriate times.

So why do they portray the gluten-free diet as if it contained virtually only processed foods?

Maybe the producers do not have time to research the truth. Maybe they focus on the sensational parts of stories instead of covering topics objectively. Maybe they think the entire United States population gorges itself on Hamburger Helper, Mac and Cheese, Oreos and Big Macs and therefore all the people who are gluten-free must slurp down their gluten-free substitutes.

Do they? Do gluten-free people only eat processed gluten-free foods?

My foods are almost all unprocessed. I buy the ingredients and I process them myself. I want to know what I eat and frankly the food I make tastes GOOD.

But that is just me. What do other people eat?

Unfortunately, I meet non-gluten-free people who think only foods that have a “gluten-free” label on the box are gluten-free. Misinformed by the media, they have no idea what gluten-free means. Their eyes widen when I tell them I eat steak, potatoes, apples, eggs, PF Changs Lettuce Wraps, Bonefish Lily’s Chicken, brownies, margaritas and a whole lot of other foods they recognize.

I wanted to find out what Gluten Free Works visitors eat so I asked our Facebook friends whether they eat unprocessed or processed foods.

Their answers did not surprise me, but will probably shock the news producers and their frowning, nodding medical experts who are supposed to be covering the gluten-free diet.

Read More »

Fatigue: The Gluten-Adrenal Connection

glutenadrenalfatigueDo you feel tired all the time? Maybe tired isn’t even strong enough of a word to describe the extreme fatigue you feel all day, every day. The problem seems to be pretty common place for those who eat a gluten-free diet.

Or maybe you have trouble falling asleep at night and wake up completely drained as if you were running a marathon in your sleep. Sure, you could chalk it up to a busy, stress-filled life, but the answer is more complex and hits closer to home that you even realize.

Allow me share with you a personal story… Read More »

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