Symptoms

Gluten Free Works Health Guide Alert: How Gluten Affects Muscles

The Gluten Free Works Health Guide Newsletter is out!

This week focuses on gluten and how it affects the muscles.

Muscles. When they are chronically tired, hurt or do not work properly, our lives are impacted. Unfortunately, it is easy to get used to how we feel and grow to think, “That’s just me.”

Gluten sensitivity and celiac disease affect the muscles in a number of negative ways. What may seem like “normal” aches and pains can be a symptom of an underlying nutrient deficiency or health condition that can be improved nutritionally or treated by a doctor. Discover the various ways gluten impacts the muscles below. Then, read the Tip that follows to find out how to fix muscle problems.

Click here to read more!

 

 

Gluten Free Works Health Guide: Discovering and Treating the Underlying Causes of Health Problems.

Have you ever wondered whether your various aches, pains and health issues are related to gluten or past damage from gluten? Headaches, muscle pains, weakness, weight gain, cavities, eye problems, neurological disorders…

Nowadays, it is common to read that gluten can cause hundreds of symptoms.

This wasn’t always the case. At one point, just a handful of symptoms were thought to stem from gluten.

Gluten Free Works changed this. We were the first organization to collect over 300 signs, symptoms, associated disorders and complications from all over the world and publish them in the groundbreaking medical reference, Recognizing Celiac Disease, in 2007.

Chronic inflammation and nutrient deficiencies are the big contributors to health problems related to gluten. But, the complications gluten causes can persist, even once we start a gluten-free diet, unless they are individually treated.

And it seems a true gluten-free diet, where gluten is totally removed from the diet, is not the norm among people who think they are Read More »

Gluten Intolerance Validated by this Popular Doctor and Author

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As common at they are, gluten allergies and elimination diets are still, many times, viewed as fringe alternative health practices and often don’t receive the mainstream validation they deserve. When some estimates show that nearly 1 in 30 people suffer at the hands of gluten, one would think the intolerance to this protein would finally gain more acceptance in mainstream medicine and media. One man, doctor and author Mark Hyman, is working to do just that.

HymanHyman, an M.D. in the field of functional medicine, pioneers techniques that aide the chronically-ill in improving their health and quality of life by determining the underlying causes of illness and treating according to those causes, as opposed to much mainstream medicine that focuses on treatments that champion subsistence and reliance on a medication. Doctor Hyman is a blogger for The Huffington Post and in a recent article, cites gluten allergies and Celiac Disease (even latent Celiac) as the cause for many ailments and conditions never previously associated with the grain protein. Read More »

Gluten-free and still sick? If so, read this story about celiac disease…

[UPDATE: Recognizing Celiac Disease has been converted and expanded into our Gluten Free Works Health Guide.]

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If you have been diagnosed with celiac disease, are following the gluten free diet yet are still sick, you may find this true story very helpful…

A few months ago, I was visiting the office of a celiac disease support organization. A woman in the office started asking me questions about her symptoms. She was diagnosed with celiac disease and following the gluten-free diet. She was suffering from peripheral neuropathy and a host of other health issues. We looked up her symptoms in our book “Recognizing Celiac Disease”and noticed trends that pointed to certain nutrient deficiencies. Symptom after symptom pointed to low folic acid, low thiamin, and low omega-3 fatty acids. When we looked up Thiamin Deficiency, she said she had almost every symptom listed.

At that point she said she couldn’t possibly have nutrient deficiencies. After her latest endoscopy with biopsy, her gastroenterologist told her that her villi in her small intestine had recovered and she was absorbing normally.

But, was she truly absorbing normally? Read More »

Gluten-Free Vegetarian or Vegan

Cheryl Harris Gluten Free Works

Gluten free vegetarian diet

Photo: Whole Foods, http://wholefoods.com

It can be challenging enough on gluten-free diet, but what if you eat a vegetarian or vegan diet? 

It’s well established that there are health benefits to reducing the amount of meat in the diets of most Americans, and the lifestyle has appeal for some people based on ethical and/or environmental reasons.  Fortunately, with extra planning, a well-rounded and delicious gluten-free vegetarian diet is possible.

The good news is that many vegetarian staples, like beans, lentils, tofu, dairy, nuts, seeds and eggs are already naturally gluten-free.  And some of the best sources of vegetarian and vegan protein are gluten-free pseudo-grains, such as quinoa, buckwheat and amaranth. Also, grains, such as millet, teff and sorghum are very nutritious.  In addition to protein and fiber, they all have other vital nutrients, like Read More »

Heal Your Gut

Leaky gut

Celiac Disease (CD) is not curable, but it is manageable by eating a strict gluten free diet.  That may not be enough.

Many suffering from CD still feel ill even after being faithful to a gluten free diet.  Celiac Disease is an autoimmune disease which causes your body to attack and destroy the microvilli and villi in your small intestines.  These are key to the absorption of nutrients from food and are also where many enzymes used in digestion are made.  When these are destroyed, the ability to absorb nutrients decreases and can lead to malnutrition.

This is not all that happens in a damaged intestine.  Gluten can cause the tight junctions, spaces between cells lining the intestines, to be damaged or destroyed allowing larger molecules such as proteins and even microorganisms to pass into the blood stream.

Under normal circumstances, the intestinal wall only permits small particles to pass through the intestinal wall and into the blood stream. When these larger molecules make it through into the blood stream our bodies do not recognize these  larger molecules and an autoimmune response begins.  It is these autoimmune responses that may be the cause of you still feeling ill.  What needs to happen to feel well again, is to Read More »

Health Alert – Fatty Liver Disease and Celiac Disease

We have some very important information to share with you today.

While we were at Columbia University’s Topics in Gastroenterology, Dr. Steven Lobritto talked about cirrhosis of the liver and how he has actually seen people who were on the liver transplant list heal enough to be taken off once they started a gluten-free diet.

According to our new book, “Recognizing Celiac Disease”, 3.4% of people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease have SILENT Celiac Disease. Most patients DO NOT have gastrointestinal symptoms.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver is a non-inflammatory hepatic (liver) disorder characterized by degenerative changes in the liver secondary to excessive accumulation of lipid in hepatocytes.

The good news is that studies showed liver enzymes normalize after 6 months on a gluten-free diet.

If you have patients or family members with non-alcoholic fatty liver (cirrhosis), who are not diagnosed with celiac disease, give them this information so they can get tested.

Related medical studies are referenced in “Recognizing Celiac Disease.” www.recognizingceliacdisease.com.

Celiac disease is a multi-system, hereditary, chronic, auto-immune disease estimated to affect 1% of the human population (3 million in the US) that is caused by the ingestion of wheat, barley, rye and oats. It is treated by removing these items from the diet. Signs, symptoms, associated disorders and complications can affect any part of the body and removal of the offending foods can result in complete recovery.  

Health in Depth: Muscle Weakness in Celiac Disease

Muscle weakness is the lack of muscle strength to perform physical work that we should be able to do, such as lifting objects, climbing steps or simply walking or getting up from a chair. Muscle weakness is different from muscle fatigue, which is the lack of energy to continue physical work once begun. Muscle weakness is also different from lassitude, or chronic fatigue, which is the feeling of tiredness or exhaustion but without loss of muscle strength.

Muscle weakness is common in celiac disease. It may stem from one or more nutrient deficiencies, associated disorders or complications. This article addresses only nutritional causes of muscle weakness resulting from malabsorption and/or loss of minerals from diarrhea or vomiting. Read More »

Helping a West Point Graduate Connect the Dots Between Symptoms and Their Causes

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My mother, Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN was giving a presentation to medical school students at a major medical school in Philadelphia. The topic was “Identifying and Correcting Nutrient Deficiencies in Celiac Disease.”

A student approached her after the presentation. She was a tall, athletic looking woman with short blond hair. She introduced herself as Amanda and told Cleo she was afraid she might have to drop out of medical school. She said she was a West Point graduate, but no one could diagnose her.

She said she had constant gastrointestinal problems and fatigue. She couldn’t concentrate. Something was terribly wrong. She could feel it. Read More »

Helping Kids With Food Allergies Overcome Anxiety

When you have a child diagnosed with a severe food allergy it can be extremely challenging to help them feel comfortable and safe in social situations.  While living with food allergies may always present challenges there are a few things you can do as a parent to help your child manage their fears and anxieties. 

First and foremost…you must try and remain as calm as you can, while still watching out for them.  When you get very worked up  and anxious in front of your child, they feel this and it passes on to them.  Teach them to be cautious and what to watch out for, but Read More »

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