Author Archives: Liz Schau

Raw Revolution Food Bars Maximize Nutritional Intake

Raw Revolution foods are a line of organic live food bars that are gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free, and corn-free — perfect for the allergic consumer. The bars are also vegan, and free of trans-fats and refined sugar. Because they are allergen-free and full of nourishing and satisfying ingredients like cashews, coconut, hazelnuts, raisins, raspberries, mango, dates, flax seeds, and almonds, these bars are filling and able to fuel the body — especially for athletes and people on the go.

The creator of the Raw Revolution products says the idea for the line of food bars came when, as a Registered Nurse and Natural Foods Chef, she became passionate about preparing and creating raw food dishes. Read More »

iPHONE App scandal Rocks the Gluten-free Community

I reported this week on a new iPHONE application, My Grocery Master, which allows users to locate gluten-free foods and brands according to zip code. The application claimed to not only allow users to locate gluten-free and lactose-free food items in popular grocery stores nationwide, but it also claimed to help users locate the product via detailed driving directions, all for an annual fee of $4.99.

While this iPHONE application (also available for iPAD and iTOUCH) purported to aide gluten-free consumers in their quest for all things allergen-free, it seems the app isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Read More »

Jenny McCarthy’s “controversial” take on Autism featured in TIME Magazine

Jenny McCarthy, actress, author, and biomedical Autism treatment activist is featured in a TIME Magazine article this week, The Autism Vaccine Debate: Who’s Afraid of Jenny McCarthy? Since claiming she successfully healed her son, Evan, 7, of Autism via unconventional natural methods and cutting-edge technology, and subsequently blaming the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine for Evan’s Autism, McCarthy has received immense criticism from the mainstream medical community; they say she’s offering hope to parents of children with Autism when indeed, there is none.

According to McCarthy, biomedical treatments are defined as those interventions that address “…physical ailments like epilepsy, leaky gut, candida, bowel disease, and food allergies.” She goes on to say, Read More »

Breastfed Babies at Reduced Risk for Developing Celiac Disease Autoimmunity

According to the Centers for Disease Control, as of 2006, 33.1% of women were choosing to exclusively breastfeed their newborn from 0-3 months of age. At the one-year mark, only 22.7% of women were still breastfeeding their baby (non-exclusively).

The American Academy of Pediatrics Committee, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Canadian Pediatric Society, the Pediatric Society of New Zealand, and other similar organizations in various countries worldwide have all made statements on infant feeding and the appropriate time to introduce solid foods into a baby’s diet. The current consensus is that solid food should not be introduced until at least the age of 4-6 months, if not later. Read More »

“Autism: Made In the U.S.A” film: what it has to do with Gluten

A new documentary produced by Gary Null, a natural health advocate and activist, takes aim at our modern medical establishment and the various ways it could possibly be contributing to chronic illness, neurological phenomenon and conditions, and specifically, Autism.

Null delves into the relationship between vaccines, food, environmental pollutants, the childhood Autism pandemic in America and what can be done about the increasing numbers. According to the Center for Disease Control, as of 2010, 1 in every 110 children will be diagnosed with Autism. Read More »

Multiple food sensitivities? Try Living Harvest

The reality for many people with gluten allergies is that they may also be allergic to other common foods. Those living with multiple food sensitivities often cannot tolerate allergens such as soy, corn, dairy, certain grains, tomatoes (or, nightshades), nuts, fish, eggs, and even chemicals or flavorings like MSG. Read More »

“Gluten-free” named #3 top food trend predicted for 2010

Liz_Schau

It’s the beginning of a new year and writers, websites, and magazines are compiling their top trends lists, as predictions for the upcoming year. After all, it’s 2010 now, and seems the best time to reflect on all of last year’s most notable food fads in order to foresee what the upcoming year will bring us in food pop culture and consumerism.

Gluten_free_labelGluten-free eating has become more and more popular and mainstream over the last few years, as more people are being diagnosed with Celiac disease and gluten intolerance/allergies (either by medical professionals or via simple elimination diets). So it’s not surprising that among the many predictions for 2010’s favorite edibles, The Daily Beast has named gluten-free food as number three on their Ten Food Trends For 2010 list. As the website says, Read More »

Gluten Intolerance Validated by this Popular Doctor and Author

Liz_Schau

As common at they are, gluten allergies and elimination diets are still, many times, viewed as fringe alternative health practices and often don’t receive the mainstream validation they deserve. When some estimates show that nearly 1 in 30 people suffer at the hands of gluten, one would think the intolerance to this protein would finally gain more acceptance in mainstream medicine and media. One man, doctor and author Mark Hyman, is working to do just that.

HymanHyman, an M.D. in the field of functional medicine, pioneers techniques that aide the chronically-ill in improving their health and quality of life by determining the underlying causes of illness and treating according to those causes, as opposed to much mainstream medicine that focuses on treatments that champion subsistence and reliance on a medication. Doctor Hyman is a blogger for The Huffington Post and in a recent article, cites gluten allergies and Celiac Disease (even latent Celiac) as the cause for many ailments and conditions never previously associated with the grain protein. Read More »

Bean flour: a healthy and inexpensive way to bake gluten-free

Liz_Schau

For many people, the thought of cooking and baking with bean flours can seem strange. After all, when trying to replicate your favorite cakes, cookies, muffins, and other sweets in order to make them gluten-free and food allergy-friendly, bean flours don’t exactly elicit the same mouth-watering cravings as traditional white and wheat flour. While bean flours may seem too savory to be added to your favorite baked goods, they actually can be a healthy and cost-effective replacement for gluten-filled ingredients.

bean_floursBeans and legumes, of course, are high in protein and fiber, among other nutrients. Bean flour varieties include green split peas or lentils, garbanzos, soy, navy and black beans, fava, red kidneys, and many others. Read More »