Tag Archives: Celiac disease

MEDICAL RESEARCH: “Pediatric case series evaluating a standardized Candida albicans skin test prod

 

 Editors’ note: This study investigating the value and safety of Candin for clinical use in children demonstrated effectiveness and safety.  Candin is a reagent or skin test for sensitivity to Candida albicans, a yeast microorganism that can cause infection.  The study recommends using Candin in combination with other reagents in infants with anergy to see if they react to antigens other than Candida albicans.  Anergy is described in Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary as the impaired or absent ability to react to common antigens administered through skin testing. Antigens are markers on the surface of cells that stimulate production of antibodies.  In this study, Candin was tested at the same time as a skin test for tuberculosis (purified protein derivative tuberculosis) for comparison of results. Read More »

Gluten-free celebrities on the rise! Madonna serves gluten-free goodies.

 

The latest celebrity to announce her affinity for the gluten-free diet is the one and only, Madonna.  In celebration of her 52nd birthday and her son’s 10th, the Queen of Pop will be hosting a party with a King and Queen theme. Madge does not maintain a strictly gluten-free diet, but announced that some GF treats including brownies will be served at the high-profile fête.

This news means more publicity for Read More »

Study reports those diagnosed with celiac disease have reduced subsequent healthcare costs

According to the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearing House, a study published in the December 2008 issue of the Journal of Insurance Medicine reports that researchers from Columbia University and CIGNA HealthCare found that diagnosis of celiac disease substantially reduces subsequent health care costs. 

The research group, led by Peter Green, M.D., a renowned authority in celiac disease from Columbia University,  looked at medical records for 10.2 million CIGNA managed care members.   Read More »

Scientists Uncover Further Steps Leading to Celiac Disease

 

 3 06 08

Contact: Sally Webster
s.webster@qmul.ac.uk
44-207-882-5404
Queen Mary, University of London

Scientists who last year identified a new genetic risk factor for coeliac disease, have, following continued research, discovered an additional seven gene regions implicated in causing the condition. The team, lead by David van Heel, Professor of Gastrointestinal Genetics at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, have further demonstrated that of the nine coeliac gene regions now know, four of these are also predisposing factors for type 1 diabetes. Their research sheds light not only on the nature of coeliac disease, but on the common origins of both diseases. It is published online today (2 March 2008) in Nature Genetics. Read More »

A great informative Harvard Health Publication on gluten

Hey guys! I just found a great health email I think all those interested in the particulars of health and current research would be really interested in. 

Harvard Health Publications

In particular, there is a great, informative and interesting article on the rise of gluten sensitivities and Celiac disease. You might have to sign up for the email newsletter to see it, but I think it’s worth it. 

The article goes into detail on various elements concerning gluten digestive issues such as; understanding what happens within the body in regards to gluten absorption, common and uncommon symptoms, testing to diagnose Celiac, and the “Super Six”, explained further in the quote below:  Read More »

Vitamin A Deficiency in Celiac Disease…Common Before & After Diagnosis

Vitamin A was first identified in 1913 because of its crucial role in vision.  Subsequent discovery of its many other duties show that a deficiency will cause a broad range of health problems.

Vitamin A is not a single compound but actually comprises a fat-soluble family of molecules that includes retinol, retinal, retinoic acid, and retinyl ester. The term vitamin A also includes certain plant carotenoids called provitamin A because they are dietary precursors of retinol.

Vitamin A is essential for normal vision and eyeball health, a properly functioning immune system, gene regulation, reproduction, embryonic development, health and protection of all the tissues that line the body, including skin and mucosa of the lungs, digestive tract, urinary tract, and genital tract, bone metabolism and normal growth and strong teeth in children.

 

Vitamin A Deficiency

The United States National Institutes of Health recommends testing vitamin A levels in people with celiac disease at diagnosis. This is because vitamin A deficiency is common in celiac disease. Deficiency can result from incomplete digestion, absorption, or metabolism. Read More »

Understanding Probiotics and Prebiotics in Celiac Disease

Our well-being is uniquely tied to the condition of our colon, which is commonly unhealthy at diagnosis of celiac disease. To keep our colon healthy, we need to understand what happens there on a microscopic level.  Hundreds of varieties of intestinal microbe populations called “flora” live there, numbering in the billions.  To put these numbers into focus, dead bacteria make up about a third of each bowel movement.  Our resident microbes, whether beneficial or harmful, play a decisive role in nourishing or damaging the cells that form the intestinal lining.  Probiotic and prebiotic foods and supplements restore and feed our friendly microbes. Read More »

Over 300 Symptoms Linked to Gluten and Celiac Disease. How Is This Possible?

 

 In 2007, Gluten Free Works published “Recognizing Celiac Disease,” the first work to present over 300 signs, symptoms, associated disorders and complications gathered from documented medical research from around the world.  The book proved that researchers were finding hundreds of health problems associated with celiac disease and gluten.  This list is now being used by celiac disease centers, national celiac organizations and health organizations to help identify at risk patients and determine whether patient symptoms are consistent with celiac disease.

But how can one disorder cause so many problems?  Here’s a look at one way…nutritional deficiencies. Read More »

Understanding Vitamin D Deficiency in Celiac Disease

 

Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin for strong bones and teeth, turns out to be a multi-tasker! Since its discovery in the early 1920s, this important fat-soluble vitamin was labeled simply as “the antirachitic vitamin” (prevents rickets). Not any more. A major discovery of how it functions as a hormone in the body when converted into its active form by the liver has spurred intense research which is revealing much more about this amazing vitamin.

We now know the active form of vitamin D is essential for the regulation of calcium and phosphorus balance in the body, the absorption of calcium and phosphorus from food in the digestive tract, proper neuromuscular function, normal growth and development and normal bone and tooth formation and maintenance. Recent medical research suggests vitamin D may also provide protection from hypertension, cancer, and several autoimmune diseases. Read More »

Columbia University Celiac Disease Center Roundtable Discussion June 7

This just in from the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University…

The Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University will continue to host a Roundtable on Celiac Disease that deals with individuals and their families’ difficulties in living with celiac disease. The program will be held monthly and would deal with children, adolescence and adult issues with respect to celiac disease.

Members of the Celiac Disease Center who will be attending the Roundtable on Celiac Disease include adult and pediatric gastroenterologists as well as our nutritionist. We will conduct this program in an interactive format allowing airing of views and questions from all participants. Read More »

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