Gluten

National Foundation for Celiac Awareness Puts Restaurant Industry to the Test

Kristen Beals Gluten Free Works

Chefs and Restaurateurs Flunk Gluten-Free Quiz at NRA Show

Ambler, Pa. (PRWEB) May 22, 2012

Chefs and restaurateurs lack a fundamental understanding of gluten-free protocols, and it’s a threat to those with gluten-related disorders, according to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA), the non-profit organization dedicated to raising awareness and improving the lives of those of celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

“When most people dine out, they expect a meal that’s safe to eat. Individuals with gluten-related disorders don’t have that luxury,” said Alice Bast, founder and president of NFCA.

Earlier this month, NFCA quizzed chefs and restaurateurs on the floor of the National Restaurant Association Show, an international gathering of professionals in the foodservice industry, and the results were alarming. Many of the chefs and restaurateurs said they have gluten-free options at their restaurants, yet less than four percent of them responded correctly to four questions regarding gluten (see “Survey Questions” below). Read More »

So the Doc says no gluten, answers to FAQs

For individuals just diagnosed with celiac disease or other gluten intolerant auto immunity issues, the prospects of learning a whole new way of eating can be daunting at first, especially for those eating the standard American diet (S.A.D.). Following are answers to a list of frequently asked questions:

What grains contain gluten?
Wheat, barley, rye, and any flours derived from these grains. There is controversy over oat’s status.

What are hidden sources of gluten?
Soy sauce (the second ingredient is wheat), barbecue sauce, marinades, teriyaki sauce, Asian sauces, or anything that contains soy sauce in the list of ingredients. Modified food starch, malted drinks, malt vinegar, most cold cereals, grain based veggie burgers, meatballs, breaded foods, durum and semolina pasta (another name for wheat flour), some seasoning blends, and many prepackaged foods.

What foods are safe to eat?
Most whole foods are safe, especially fruits, veggies, legumes, oils, nuts and seeds, and lean meats, and for some people, dairy. Safe grains include rice, corn, millet, tapioca, sorghum, teff, buckwheat (not related to wheat), potato starch, bean flours, nut flours, and coconut flour. Some people may tolerate gluten free oats, but caution is advised as there is controversy over their gluten free status. Visit this link for more information. Read More »

Stop & Shop Launches New Health and Wellness Initiatives

Kristen Beals Gluten Free Works

PURCHASE, N.Y., April 25, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — The Stop & Shop Supermarket Company LLC is launching two new health and wellness initiatives this month to address health concerns for all customers and their families. In its ongoing efforts to fight childhood obesity and help kids live healthier lifestyles, Stop & Shop announced that the first issue of its brand new Kid Healthy Ideas, a free health and wellness quarterly magazine, is now available in all stores.

The 12-page, full-color publication, is geared towards kids ages 8 to 12 and features health-related educational articles, games and recipes.

Read More »

The Dark Side of Wheat: New Perspectives on Celiac Disease & Wheat Intolerance Part 2 of 3

(Editor’s Note: Click here to see Part One)

OUR BIOLOGICALLY INAPPROPRIATE DIET

In a previous article, I discussed the role that wheat plays as an industrial adhesive (e.g. paints, paper mache’, and book binding-glue) in order to illustrate the point that it may not be such a good thing for us to eat. The problem is implicit in the word gluten, which literally means “glue” in Latin and in words like pastry and pasta, which derives from wheatpaste, the original concoction of wheat flour and water which made such good plaster in ancient times. What gives gluten its adhesive and difficult-to-digest qualities are the high levels of disulfide bonds it contains. These same sulfur-to-sulfur bonds are found in hair and vulcanized rubber products, which we all know are difficult to decompose and are responsible for the sulfurous odor they give off when burned.

There will be 676 million metric tons of wheat produced this year alone, making it the primary cereal of temperate regions and third most prolific cereal grass on the planet. Read More »

The Dark Side of Wheat: New Perspectives on Celiac Disease & Wheat Intolerance Part 3 of 3

Editor’s Note:
Click here to see Part 1.
Click here to see Part 2.

WHEAT: AN EXCEPTIONALLY UNWHOLESOME GRAIN.

Wheat presents a special case insofar as wild and selective breeding has produced variations which include up to 6 sets of chromosomes (3 genomes worth!) capable of generating a massive number of proteins each with a distinct potentiality for antigenicity. Common bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), for instance, has over 23,788 proteins cataloged thus far. In fact, the genome for common bread wheat is actually 6.5 times larger than that of the human genome!

With up to a 50% increase in gluten content of some varieties of wheat, it is amazing that we continue to consider “glue-eating” a normal behavior, whereas wheat-avoidance is left to the “celiac” who is still perceived by the majority of health care practitioners as mounting a “freak” reaction to the consumption of something intrinsically wholesome. Read More »

Were You Diagnosed with Gluten Sensitivity or Celiac Disease by a Doctor or Did You Figure It Out on Your Own?

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

do doctors understand gluten sensitivity or celiac diseaseIt is well documented that only a small minority of those with celiac disease are successfully diagnosed in a medical setting.

Gluten sensitivity, which we based on medical research and proposed in Recognizing Celiac Disease in 2007,  has only recently been accepted as a true medical condition. So we decided to hold an informal survey to see just how people are becoming gluten-free? How are they finding out that gluten sensitivity or celiac disease are the cause of their health problems and are doctors diagnosing them or are they figuring it out on their own?

We posted this question to our GlutenFreeWorks Facebook friends and here are their answers. Were YOU diagnosed by a doctor? Leave your comments below! Read More »

Which Medications Do You No Longer Need Since Going Gluten-free?

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

On December 13, I posted a question on the Glutenfreeworks Facebook page to ask people who had adopted a gluten-free diet if they no longer needed medications they had been taking. The response was incredible. Dozens of people described how they no longer needed drugs, some of which they had been taking for years or decades.

Here is my post and their responses…

“I gave a presentation to a group and mentioned a friend who had been on Zantac for 20 years. I went on to say that once she went gluten-free the acid reflux disappeared. A woman in the audience stood up and said the same thing happened to her – she had been on it since she was 10 (I’m guessing she was in her mid to late 30s.).

My question for you is what medication (of any kind) were you on, before you went gluten-free, that you no longer need to take and how long did it take before you did not need it anymore?”

    •  

      Ashley Nikki Garcia Prilosec & zantec. ! 

      December 13 at 5:25pm · 
    •  

      Lauren Smith I also took OTC for heartburn on a near daily basis. No more! 

      December 13 at 5:27pm · 
    •  

      Surely Masquelier McMaster I’ve taken Neurontin for 10 years..GF since Sept. and realized in Nov. that I don’ t need it!  Read More »

Who Needs a Gluten Test? Video by “Gluten Syndrome” Expert Dr. Rodney Ford Explains

Dr. Rodney Ford, pediatrician and author of The Gluten Syndrome, provides us with an excellent and easy-to-follow video that tells us how to know if we need a gluten test.

This short presentation explains which symptoms to look for and tells you the tests you need to to request to find out if gluten is making you sick.

Dr. Ford estimates up to one third of people with chronic diseases are being affected by gluten and sums up why people do not ask to be tested. “We are so used to being sick that we don’t know we’re sick.” People think they have always been this way, so they do not know to ask.

He then establishes a great litmus test to determine who should be tested – “People who are sick, tired or grumpy should be tested.”

 

Read More »

Why “Real Food” Is Important to the Gluten-free Community

Real Gluten Free Foods

“Real Food” can be defined as natural, unprocessed, traditional and nourishing foods that human have always eaten. This includes things like whole fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, herbs and spices, fish and seafood, and animal protein. These lie in stark contrast to our modern foods which have been grown with the use of pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, have very often been genetically modified, and had chemicals and flavorings (synthetics and other highly-addictive allergens) added.

For those living a gluten-free lifestyle, supporting “real food”, or “pro food” as it’s sometimes called, with our purchases is important because it reduces the risk of being exposed to and ingesting gluten. Processed foods — both conventional and Read More »

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