Research

Psoriasis and Celiac Disease – Genetic Link

The research below further supports the links demonstrated between celiac disease and psoriasis as noted in the book “Recognizing Celiac Disease.” (www.recognizingceliacdisease.com) Although not the focus of this study, the link could be a genetic sensitivity to gluten itself, considering the resolution of symptoms seen by people with psoriasis who go on a gluten-free diet. In addition, the other disorders, diabetes type 1 and arthritis have been linked to celiac disease/gluten sensitivity reactions. – John Libonati, Glutenfreeworks.com

Psoriasis: 7 New Genetic Clues

Newly Discovered Genetic Variations May Make Psoriasis More Likely, Study Shows
By Miranda Hitti

WebMD Medical NewsReviewed by Louise Chang, MDApril 3, 2008 — Scientists have discovered seven genetic variations linked to psoriasis.

If confirmed in other studies, those gene variants may make good targets for new psoriasis drugs, note the researchers, who included Anne Bowcock, PhD, genetics professor at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

“Common diseases like psoriasis are incredibly complex at the genetic level,” Bowcock says in a news release. “Our research shows that small but common DNA differences are important in the development of psoriasis. Although each variation makes only a small contribution to the disease, patients usually have a number of different genetic variations that increases their risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.”

Bowcock’s team compared DNA from 223 psoriasis patients (including 91 with psoriatic arthritis) and 519 people without psoriasis, and also from two other large groups of people with and without psoriasis.

Through those comparisons, the researchers identified seven genetic variations linked to psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and confirmed other variations already linked to psoriasis.

One of the newly discovered variants is in a genetic region tied to four other autoimmune diseases: celiac disease, type 1 diabetes, Grave’s disease, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Further studies are needed to confirm the findings, Bowcock and colleagues note in the April 4 online edition of Public Library of Science Genetics.

View Article Sources
SOURCES:

Liu, Y. Public Library of Science Genetics, April 4, 2008; online edition.

News release, Public Library of Science.

© 2008 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.
http://www.webmd.com:80/skin-problems-and-treatments/psoriasis/news/20080403/psoriasis-7-new-genetic-clues

Research Study on Genetic Testing Looking for Survey Participants

Gluten Free Works Jennifer Harris

Columbia University Celiac Disease Center

The Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University invites you to participate in a research study looking at individuals’ knowledge of genetic testing of celiac disease and their potential concerns with such testing.  The goal of this study is to increase understanding of the factors associated with making an informed decision regarding such testing and to better provide the necessary information to make such a decision.

A brief survey has been developed to address some of these factors.  The survey only takes five minutes to complete, it is anonymous, and no identifying information is collected. 
 
If you or a family member has celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, Read More »

Researchers Develop A Faster Way To Diagnose Celiac Disease

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

The following article was written by Erika Gebel and reprinted by permision from Chemical and Engineering News.

Celiac Disease Gluten Sensitivity Test

Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity Often Go Undiagnosed

Judging by their symptoms, people with celiac disease could have food poisoning, depression, or iron deficiency. As a result, doctors often have trouble diagnosing the serious immune disorder. To develop a better test for the disease, researchers have made a device that can detect nanograms of gluten antibodies, the hallmarks of celiac disease, in human Read More »

Researchers Seeking Adults with Celiac Disease

Adults that have been diagnosed with Celiac Disease are being sought to participate in a study to identify factors associated with the development of Celiac Disease.  The goal of the study is to find the genes that may predispose individuals to develop this autoimmune disease.  Adults eligible to participate in this study must have been diagnosed with Celiac Disease through a small intestinal biopsy. Spouses may also be eligible to participate.

Participants will be asked to provide a blood sample, complete a questionnaire, and provide medical records regarding their diagnosis. There is no cost to Read More »

Scientists uncover further steps leading to celiac disease

Contact: Sally Webster
s.webster@qmul.ac.uk
44-207-882-5404
Queen Mary, University of London

Scientists who last year identified a new genetic risk factor for coeliac disease, have, following continued research, discovered an additional seven gene regions implicated in causing the condition. The team, lead by David van Heel, Professor of Gastrointestinal Genetics at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, have further demonstrated that of the nine coeliac gene regions now know, four of these are also predisposing factors for type 1 diabetes. Their research sheds light not only on the nature of coeliac disease, but on the common origins of both diseases. It is published online today (2 March 2008) in Nature Genetics.

Professor van Heel and his team, including collaborators from Ireland, the Netherlands, and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, first performed a genome wide association study in coeliac disease. Genetic markers across the genome were compared in coeliac disease subjects versus healthy controls. They then assessed around 1,000 of the strongest markers in a further ~ 5,000 samples. Their results identified seven new risk regions, six of which harbour important genes critical in the control of immune responses, highlighting their significance in the development of the disease.

Coeliac disease is common in the West, afflicting around 1 per cent of the population. It is an immune-mediated disease, triggered by intolerance to gluten (a protein found in wheat, barley and rye containing foods), that prevents normal digestion and absorption of nutrients. If undetected it can lead to a number of often severe problems among them anaemia, poor bone health, fatigue and weight loss. Currently only a restricted diet can diminish symptoms.

Professor van Heel said: “So far our findings explain nearly half of the heritability of coeliac disease – now studies with many more samples from individuals with coeliac disease are needed to identify the precise causal genetic variants from each region, and understand how these influence biological processes.”

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The research was funded by Coeliac UK and The Wellcome Trust. Coeliac disease case studies are available for interview from Coeliac UK upon request.

The paper, ‘Newly identified genetic risk variant for celiac disease related to the immune response’ is published online, on 2 March 2008, in Nature Genetics.

For case studies contact:
Kate Newman
Press Office
Coeliac UK
Tel: 020 8399 7478
Mobile: 07952 071014

Notes to editors:

Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry offers international levels of excellence in research and teaching while serving a population of unrivalled diversity amongst which cases of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, TB, oral disease and cancers are prevalent, within east London and the wider Thames Gateway. Through partnership with our linked trusts, notably Barts and The London NHS Trust, and our associated University Hospital trusts – Homerton, Newham, Whipps Cross and Queen’s – the School’s research and teaching is informed by an exceptionally wide ranging and stimulating clinical environment.

At the heart of the School’s mission lies world class research, the result of a focused programme of recruitment of leading research groups from the UK and abroad and a £100 million investment in state-of-the-art facilities. Research is focused on translational research, cancer, cardiology, clinical pharmacology, inflammation, infectious diseases, stem cells, dermatology, gastroenterology, haematology, diabetes, neuroscience, surgery and dentistry.

The School is nationally and internationally recognised for research in these areas, reflected in the £40 million it attracts annually in research income. Its fundamental mission, with its partner NHS Trusts, and other partner organisations such as CRUK, is to ensure that that the best possible clinical service is underpinned by the very latest developments in scientific and clinical teaching, training and research.

Websites
www.coeliac.org.uk
www.coeliac.co.uk/about_us/press_office/writing_about_coeliac_disease/118.asp
http://www.wellcome.ac.uk
http://www.icms.qmul.ac.uk/
http://www.icms.qmul.ac.uk/Profiles/Gastro/van%20Heel%20David.htm
http://www.nature.com/ng/index.html

Scientists Uncover Further Steps Leading to Celiac Disease

 

 3 06 08

Contact: Sally Webster
s.webster@qmul.ac.uk
44-207-882-5404
Queen Mary, University of London

Scientists who last year identified a new genetic risk factor for coeliac disease, have, following continued research, discovered an additional seven gene regions implicated in causing the condition. The team, lead by David van Heel, Professor of Gastrointestinal Genetics at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, have further demonstrated that of the nine coeliac gene regions now know, four of these are also predisposing factors for type 1 diabetes. Their research sheds light not only on the nature of coeliac disease, but on the common origins of both diseases. It is published online today (2 March 2008) in Nature Genetics. Read More »

Shocking Facts About Celiac Disease

celiac awareness month

Photo credit: Celiac Disease Awareness Month

May is National Celiac Disease Awareness Month, so it seems appropriate to share some medical facts about this autoimmune disease that just might shock you.

These facts come from Dr. Tom O’Bryan who is is a nationally recognized speaker and workshop leader specializing in gluten sensitivity and celiac disease.  Dr. O’Bryan’s specialty is in teaching the many manifestations of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease as they occur inside and outside of the Read More »

Stanford University Seeks Celiac Disease Study Participants

 

StanfordSeal[1]Jennifer Iscol, of the Celiac Community Foundation of Northern California, just distributed this message regarding a celiac disease study at Stanford University.

“Volunteers are needed for a genetic study on celiac disease at Stanford University. Please consider participating. Community participation is an essential component of Stanford’s celiac disease research. The research benefits all of us and future generations.

http://www.celiaccommunity.org/stanford-celiac-genetic-study/

Announcement from Stanford:

We are conducting a study to understand the genetic basis of celiac disease.  Families with at least one parent and one child with celiac disease are encouraged to enroll together.

The study involves: Read More »

Study Finds 1 in 5 Children With Celiac Disease Sustain Intestinal Damage Even on a Gluten-Free Diet

baby-sleepingIn a new medical study, researchers from MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) and Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) were surprised to discover that nearly one in five children with celiac disease sustained persistent intestinal damage, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet.1

These findings are consistent with research in adults, which showed that more than 33 percent of adult patients on a gluten-free diet have persistent intestinal damage, despite a reduction of symptoms or the results of blood tests.

Current guidelines for pediatric celiac disease patients recommend a single biopsy at diagnosis and follow-up blood testing to monitor recovery of the intestinal mucosa. It was assumed that intestinal mucosa (lining) healed in children after adopting a strict gluten-free diet and that the blood tests would accurately reflect whether healing was occurring or not. It appears this assumption was Read More »


  1. http://www.news-medical.net/news/20161130/Study-finds-1-in-5-pediatric-celiac-disease-patients-on-gluten-free-diet-sustain-persistent-intestinal-damage.aspx 

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