Health

Can Medicine Make You Sicker? Common Drugs that Deplete Nutrients

medications that cause nutrient deficienciesWhether due to malabsorption from an undiagnosed syndrome like celiac disease, poor diet or defective activation of nutrients, many people are not receiving or utilizing the nutrients their bodies need to thrive.

The human body is tough. You can operate at sub-optimal levels for years or decades before a clinical symptom becomes apparent or is recognized as resulting from a deficiency.

Unfortunately, this recognition frequently comes only after symptoms have become so severe as to significantly impact your health.  Until that point, medications and surgeries are more likely to be used as treatments, neither of which correct the underlying cause of the deficiency.

In fact, many drugs exacerbate nutrient depletion.  So, while they may improve your symptoms in the short term, they can cause more harm than good in the long term.

Many prescription and non-prescription medications can deplete nutrients by any of these ways:

1. Preventing normal digestion and/or absorption, so nutrients cannot get into the body.

2. Interfering with nutrient transport and/or use in the body, so nutrients cannot Read More »

Can You Answer? How Do You Avoid Gluten When You Eat Out?

Eating out can seem like navigating a minefield, with gluten lurking in the least expected places.

How do you protect yourself and avoid gluten when you eat out?

Do you talk to the manager? Do you bring your own food? Do you call ahead? Do you use any Apps?

What mistakes have you made in the past that you want other people to know about so they can avoid doing the same thing?

Answer in the comments below! Thank you!

Celiac Disease – Microbes Matter – Probiotics a.k.a. Good Bacteria in Your Gut

Health Alert – Microbes Matter – Probiotics a.k.a. Good Bacteria in Your Gut

Strange as it seems, our well-being is uniquely tied to the condition of our colon, which is commonly unhealthy at diagnosis of celiac disease. To keep our colon healthy, we need to understand what happens there on a microscopic level.  Hundreds of varieties of intestinal microbe populations called “flora” live there, numbering in the billions.  To put these numbers into focus, dead bacteria make up about a third of each bowel movement.  Our resident microbes, whether beneficial or harmful, play a decisive role in nourishing or damaging the cells that form the intestinal lining.  Probiotic and prebiotic foods and supplements restore and feed our friendly microbes.


Probiotic flora inhibit colonization of pathogens by physically preventing them from adhering to the gut lining.  Other important functions are:

  • Produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA)s.  SCFAs are important and necessary energy byproducts formed during fermentation of undigested carbohydrates in the colon by flora.  SCFAs nourish the colonocytes, the cells that line the colon. They also help absorb salts and water from stool.

  • Produce a form of vitamin K and appreciable amounts of biotin.
  • Reduce the presence of putrefactive enzymes.

  • Protect against toxic substances.

  • Contribute to normal bowel movements.

For these reasons, we need to use probiotics and prebiotics every day to improve our overall health and specifically our intestinal health.  This is especially important if fatigue, weakness, achiness, depression, foggy thinking and digestive problems continue while maintaining a gluten-free diet. 


(This Health Alert was taken from information found in
Issue #9 – Microbes Matter of the Gluten Free Gazette.)  Celiac disease is a hereditary, auto-immune disorder estimated to affect 1% of the human population (3 million in the

US). Less than 3 % are estimated to be medically diagnosed, but numbers are expected to rapidly increase as diagnosis improves. Celiac disease is caused by the ingestion of wheat, barley, rye and oats and treated by removing these items from the diet. Signs, symptoms, associated disorders and complications can affect any part of the body and removal of the offending foods can result in complete recovery.  Visit Glutenfreeworks.com for more information.

Celiac Disease Q & A: Common Nutrition and Celiac Disease Questions

By John Libonati

Commonly asked questions on nutrition and Celiac Disease, answered by Melinda Dennis, MS, RD, of the Celiac Disease Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Ms. Dennis has herself had Celiac Disease for more than 17 years.

Q. What is it like for a person you see who is newly diagnosed with Celiac Disease?
A. The gluten-free diet requires more preparation, taking food with you when you travel, making sure that you are safe in dining-out situations or when you are visiting with family or friends. So for some, it is very simple and straight forward and they are already experimenting with new grains like amaranth, buckwheat, millet, sorghum, and teff. But some people are completely unfamiliar with these grains and it is a bit more of a stretch for them. Many people just eat on the run these days and this really makes it challenging.
Others are in complete denial. Perhaps they were having no symptoms but this was discovered through a blood test and they think – do I really need to change my life? Those are the people who, understandably, ask “how much can I get away with?” So there are all different types of people. But more and more people are coming into the clinic well educated about this because of the good information on the web. That’s a big change from about seven or so years ago when there were very few resources.
 

Q. There are many gluten-free foods on the market now. Does this make it easier for those diagnosed with Celiac Disease?
A. Yes. But it’s important to stress that the gluten-free diet isn’t just about what we need to take out of our meals, it’s about making sure the foods you do choose have lots of nutrients. Rice, corn and potatoes have a really high glycemic index, and they don’t have a lot of fiber. They can create food cravings. They can lead to weight gain and they are not nutritionally dense. So when we think of Celiac Disease, we think – how can we make up for the fact that we don’t have a very high protein wheat product any longer? What can we substitute and what would be superior? That’s when we work on educating about other grains that are healthier and have plenty of vitamins and minerals. Several of the gluten-free foods are now fortified with B vitamins, iron and trace minerals, and you can check the labels to make sure.
 

Q. It’s great there are more gluten-free options, but even reading the labels don’t always help. What items have hidden gluten?
A. Lots of things you wouldn’t expect contain gluten. Toothpaste can have gluten; you have to be careful to wash your hands carefully after feeding your dog because chow usually contains gluten. Dental pumice that is used to polish your teeth may contain gluten. Soy sauce, gravies and marinades are suspect. Even communion wafers. Patients need to be educated on all of this, because consistent exposure to gluten will lead to increased damage to the small intestine.
 

Q. Do most patients eventually adopt a healthy, gluten-free diet?
A. Most patients, even those who have a hard time with the diagnosis, do learn how to eat well. From my own experience, I feel it was actually a blessing to be diagnosed. It changed my life for the better. It empowered me to make the right decisions, to eat well—actually better than I had ever eaten before. I travel more now and experiment with tasty foods, more ethnic food, as well. So it’s a good thing to have a diagnosis—and learn the best ways to take care of your body and be healthy.

Above content provided by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.
For advice about your medical care, consult your doctor.
Source: http://www.thebostonchannel.com:80/bethisrael-old/17014446/detail.html

————————
“””Author Information: John Libonati, Philadelphia, PA
Publisher, Glutenfreeworks.com.
Editor & Publisher, Recognizing Celiac Disease.
John can be reached by e-mail here.”””

Celiac Disease Q & A: Common Nutrition and Celiac Disease Questions

The following questions and answers were developed by the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center at Harvard Medical School:

Q. What is it like for a person you see who is newly diagnosed with Celiac Disease?
A. The gluten-free diet requires more preparation, taking food with you when you travel, making sure that you are safe in dining-out situations or when you are visiting with family or friends. So for some, it is very simple and straight forward and they are already experimenting with new grains like amaranth, buckwheat, millet, sorghum, and teff. But some people are Read More »

Celiac Disease: Why You Must Depend on Yourself to Be Healthy

Below is an important letter by Cleo Libonati, celiac disease author and speaker. She explains why you must be your own health advocate if you wish to be healthy and receive optimal care.

Dear Friend,

For the past three years, I have met with HMOs, pharmaceutical companies, politicians, doctors, dietitians, celiac support groups, and patients across the United States. One thing is abundantly clear. Doctors are not recognizing celiac disease and do not realize how little they know about the disorder.

In 2004, the National Institutes of Health called for education of physicians and other healthcare providers about celiac disease. To date, few efforts have been undertaken and none has succeeded.

The result is missed diagnoses, inadequate follow-up, unnecessary surgeries, improperly prescribed medications and needless pain. During my presentations, I meet many people who think they are receiving good treatment and cannot understand why no one has told them their persisting symptoms are due to simple nutrient deficiencies. Read More »

Celiac Expert Answers – Could a Gluten-Free Diet Lead to Other Diseases? Video!

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

Weight loss, fad, miracle cure…there is an enormous amount of misinformation concerning the gluten-free diet in the news, on the internet and even in the medical community.

One of the worst ideas being perpetuated is that following a gluten-free diet can somehow be bad for you.

Dr. Stefano Guandalini, Founder and Medical Director of Columbia University’s Celiac Disease Center, answers the important question – Could following a gluten-free diet lead to other diseases?

Read More »

Chef Damian Cardone Brags About Feeding Gluten-free Patrons High Gluten Pasta

 

[Editor’s Note: This story is from 2011. It still illustrates why we must be vigilant about where we go to eat.]

Gluten-free Nation, you should be rightly shocked, dismayed and FURIOUS!  A chef in Glenwood Springs, Colorado is poisoning you…and bragging about it.

Chef Damian Cardone is wantonly feeding gluten pasta to patrons who request gluten-free food according to a post on his Facebook page. 

Chef Poisons People Gluten Free Works

Cardone was deliberately feeding high gluten food to people as of March 10 according the dates on comments to his post.  

It gets worse.  Cardone seems to relish his campaign to feed gluten-free individuals gluten… Read More »

Chevys Fresh Mex Launches Gluten-free Menu

[We have been informed Chevys no longer offers a gluten-free menu. 1/1/2017]

The chain is the third to introduce gluten-free items this month

 

Chevys’ Guac My Way guacamole is part of its new gluten-free menu. Instead of chips, the dish is served with corn tortillas.

Chevys Fresh Mex this week became the latest restaurant chain to launch a gluten-free menu in its company-owned locations.

Chevys’ launch follows the debut earlier this month of Domino’s Pizza’s new gluten-free crust and Chuck E. Cheese’s test of new gluten-free products, including a pizza and a cupcake.

The new menus, which cater to those with gluten-related disorders, have also raised controversy over whether restaurants can accurately label a menu item “gluten free” if there is a risk of cross contamination.

Read More »

Chick-fil-A Adds Gluten-free Grilled Nuggets to Kid’s Menu

Gluten Free Works Jennifer Harris

chick fil a grilled nuggetsChick-fil-A is expanding its gluten-free options by adding grilled chicken nuggets and Buddy Fruits to their Kid’s menu.

According to Chick-fil-A’s full-time dietitian Jodie Worrell, these new menu additions come as part of Chick-fil-A’s broader initiative to offer healthier menu options to customers. Initiative highlights include the addition of the Fruit Cup in 2004 and moving to a complete menu (including all condiments) with zero trans fats in 2008. Chick-fil-A also is actively working to reduce sodium across its menu, including a 40 percent sodium reduction in its Chargrilled Chicken filet, 25 percent less sodium in breads and removing 10 percent of sodium in dressings and sauces. Additionally, the chain has removed high fructose corn syrup from its chocolate milk, and some salad dressings and sauces.

According to the company, adding grilled chicken nuggets to their kids menu marks the first time a national fast food chain has offered Read More »

>