Archive for the ‘Autism’ Category

 


Gluten-free diets are often a cornerstone treatment in Autism and developmental therapy. 

 
 

Eating gluten-free is both cost effective and healthy. Photo: Global Crisis News

Gut and Psychology Syndrome, or G.A.P.S as it's called, relies on the idea that in healing the gut (that is, dysbiosis -- the state of microbial imbalance) through whole foods and natural lifestyle choices, many neurological conditions can be eased or cured.

  G.A.P.S. diets purportedly have the potential to heal everything from depression to mental fog, dyslexia, to, of course, Autism.  It is the idea that (more…)


[Editor's Note: June 4, 2012 Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Cooking Made Easy is currently out of stock. The book is being made into an e-book and will be coming out soon!]

Can news of a cookbook make someone smile? It can if the recipes it provides helps change a life…

“I am sitting here listening to my daughter in her speech class just thinking how this gluten free diet is making such changes. Brings tears to my eyes. I will purchase that new cookbook with a smile.” -Courtney

As more and more people come to realize the benefits of a gluten-free, dairy-free diet for autism and general health, the brand new cookbook, “Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Cooking Made Easy,” is set to produce smiles like Courtney’s across the country and around the world.

Published by Gluten Free Works, this handy book is making it easy to understand and prepare wonderful gluten-free and dairy-free meals that meet individual nutritional needs. (more…)

John Libonati

The Avalanche of New Mercury-Autism Studies

August 7th, 2010 by John Libonati

by Mark Geier, MD, PhD & David Geier

July 24, 2010

Dear Everyone: We wanted to share with you the avalanche of new mercury-autism studies published yesterday in the peer-reviewed literature. Yesterday, there were six studies published in one day that implicate a causal role for mercury exposure in autistic disorders.

(1) Sorting Out the Spinning of Autism - Heavy Metals - Mercury - & Incidence

"We analyzed the data reported in some articles that have been, or might be, taken to support the view of no-real-increase or no-environmental-connection. Overall, we have offered a critical view of some of the literature from the perspective of research scientists who have become interested in the topic within the past five years and sought to gauge the actual state of scientific knowledge regarding autism etiology...  To summarize, of the 58 empirical reports on autism and heavy metal toxins, 43 suggest some link may be present, while 13 reports found no link. Even with the tendency for null results not to be reported, it cannot be said there is no evidence for a link between heavy metal toxins and autism: although the question may still be open-in sum, the evidence favors a link." (more…)

Jenny McCarthy, actress, author, and biomedical Autism treatment activist is featured in a TIME Magazine article this week, The Autism Vaccine Debate: Who's Afraid of Jenny McCarthy? Since claiming she successfully healed her son, Evan, 7, of Autism via unconventional natural methods and cutting-edge technology, and subsequently blaming the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine for Evan's Autism, McCarthy has received immense criticism from the mainstream medical community; they say she's offering hope to parents of children with Autism when indeed, there is none.

According to McCarthy, biomedical treatments are defined as those interventions that address "...physical ailments like epilepsy, leaky gut, candida, bowel disease, and food allergies." She goes on to say, (more…)

A new documentary produced by Gary Null, a natural health advocate and activist, takes aim at our modern medical establishment and the various ways it could possibly be contributing to chronic illness, neurological phenomenon and conditions, and specifically, Autism.

Null delves into the relationship between vaccines, food, environmental pollutants, the childhood Autism pandemic in America and what can be done about the increasing numbers. According to the Center for Disease Control, as of 2010, 1 in every 110 children will be diagnosed with Autism. (more…)

Swan_Cindy_Billings_MT

rice_puddingRead on to find a list of calcium rich foods your doctor forgot to tell you about...

Gluten free living for those with autoimmunity can be a challenge, but what if you’re also lactose intolerant, allergic to dairy, or intolerant to caseins? How many times have you been confronted with the question or personal concern of nutrition and adequate calcium intake? This is an especially legitimate concern for children, adolescents, pregnant and lactating women, postmenopausal women, and men and women at risk for osteoporosis and other bone diseases.

Are dairy products or supplements the only answer?

(more…)

A five year old Canadian boy, diagnosed with severe autism, was cured when the true cause of his mental disorder was found to be celiac disease and he was treated with a gluten-free diet and nutritional supplements.

Photo originally posted to Flickr as "Jack"

Photo originally posted to Flickr as "Jack"

His autism was cured because he was never really autistic in the first place. He had celiac disease, an immune response to wheat, barley, rye and oats that damages the intestines leading to malabsorption of nutrients.

Gluten-restricted diets have become increasingly popular among parents seeking treatment for children diagnosed with autism.(1)

What if certain children who are diagnosed with autism actually have celiac disease?

Neurological disorders stemming from celiac disease have been widely documented in medical literature. Some of these conditions include poor balance, tremors, migraines, chronic fatigue, schizophrenia, epilepsy, apathy, depression, insomnia, behavioral disorders, inability to concentrate and anxiety.(2)

Many of these issues are due to nutritional deficiencies resulting from the intestinal damage that celiac disease causes. If caused by celiac disease, they improve once gluten is removed from the diet and the intestine heals and functions properly.

Genuis and Bouchard, researchers at the University of Alberta, recently published the case of the 5-year-old boy who had been diagnosed with severe autism at a specialty clinic for autistic spectrum disorders. After an initial investigation suggested underlying celiac disease and varied nutrient deficiencies, a gluten-free diet was instituted.(1) His diet and supplements were adjusted to secure nutritional sufficiency.

The patient's gastrointestinal symptoms rapidly resolved, and signs and symptoms suggestive of autism progressively abated.(1)

This case is an example of a common malabsorption syndrome (celiac disease) associated with central nervous system dysfunction and suggests that in some cases, nutritional deficiency may be a cause of developmental delay.

Genuis and Bouchard recommended that all children with neurodevelopmental problems (more…)

If you or someone you know has a child with a mental illness, behavioral problem or unexplained neurological issue, you must watch these videos. They vividly illustrate how gluten and celiac disease can cause neurological illnesses and how removing gluten and casein from the diet can improve or cure the child.

Eamon Murphy started exhibiting mental aberrations and problems eating at three months of age. By the time he was three, his parents were frantically trying to understand what had caused his developmental delay in walking and talking, and now his trances, seizure-like episodes and regression. After a determined effort by his mother and a series of extraordinarily lucky events, he was finally diagnosed with celiac disease…and FULLY RECOVERED.

Watch these videos NOW and then forward this message to everyone you know with a child with a similar mental illness and their healthcare providers…because it is unacceptable that any child should be unnecessarily consigned to a life of suffering and diminished potential when a simple change in diet may cure them.

Eamon is totally normal now. If he had not been diagnosed, it is easy to see how he could have become incapacitated within a few years as his body and mind became sicker and sicker. Eventually, he may have been labeled autistic or schizophrenic. He may just have been called odd and slow.

Was it a miracle that Eamon recovered? No. It was a miracle that Eamon was diagnosed...

Here are some facts:

Autism affects 1 in 150 children. Medical experts recommend behavioral management and specialized speech, physical and occupational therapies (costing an estimated $70,000 per year per child), medications, community support and parental training.

Medical experts recommend AGAINST dietary intervention, yet the gluten-free/casein-free diet that helped Eamon has been demonstrated in thousands of cases to improve or resolve symptoms.

Celiac disease is still considered a rare gastrointestinal disorder that affects children by the majority of health professionals. In reality, celiac disease affects 1 in 100 people of any age, classifying it an epidemic by NIH standards. More people have celiac disease than Type 1 diabetes, breast cancer or autism. Diagnosis of celiac disease is estimated to take up to 11 years from first presentation of symptoms. Only 5% of people with celiac disease are estimated to be diagnosed.

Gastrointestinal problems occur in about 20% of people with celiac disease whereas neurological problems have been seen in as high as 51% at time of diagnosis.

The treatment for celiac disease is removing gluten from the diet and correcting nutrient deficiencies and any complications that have developed.

Unless you have symptoms that doctors expect to see - chronic diarrhea, failure to thrive, abdominal bloating and pain, and anemia - your likelihood of being diagnosed is extremely low.

For a complete list of symptoms related to celiac disease including dozens of neurological issues and problems in childhood, visit Gluten Free Works.

An excellent resource that outlines over 300 signs and symptoms and explains the relationship between celiac disease and the nutrient deficiencies that cause them is the book Recognizing Celiac Disease, by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN. Recognizing Celiac Disease was endorsed by Dr. Peter Green, the director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University who diagnosed Eamon Murphy.

John Libonati

Jenny McCarthy Is Gluten- and Dairy-Free and in Shape

March 27th, 2009 by John Libonati

In Shape magazine, that is — on the cover of the May issue. Actress, author, autism activist, and mother Jenny McCarthy said she ballooned to 211 pounds after the birth of her son, who's now 6 years old. Weight Watchers helped her slim down since it taught her about portion control and to be conscious of what she eats.

jenny-mccarthy_shape

Then three years ago she switched to a diet that's gluten- and dairy-free, to match her son Evan's diet. Not only did it help her shed even more weight, but it's greatly improved her son's autism symptoms. A typical day consists of an egg white omelet for breakfast, then for lunch and dinner she enjoys fresh fruit and veggies (she purées them to make her own soups) with fish. For snacks she loves “those little packets of nuts from Starbucks.” Jenny also stays strong and flexible by practicing yoga, and is even trying to teach it to her honey, Jim Carrey. Check out the May issue of Shape for her 15-minute yoga sculpting workout.

Source: http://www.fitsugar.com:80/2971971

Reporting Amelia Santaniello MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) ― Like most young boys, Will Johnson is all about dinosaurs, not necessarily dairy. In fact, he's allergic to milk and eats gluten- and dairy-free.

But the lack of dairy in his diet might actually be helping him grow in new ways. He is on what has become known as the autism diet, which he said does everything.

"He was diagnosed with high-functioning autism about a little over a year ago," said Will's mother Janette Johnson. She added he was very hyper and energetic at the time.

Swings and ball pits weren't enough to get the meltdowns and sensory needs associated with Will's autism under control.

"Even a few months ago, he wouldn't be able to be around here at all," Janette Johnson said.

She decided to start her son on a gluten-free, casein-free diet after hearing from other parents it could work miracles. But, to fully understand the science behind the diet, it's important to note what gluten and casein actually are.

Gluten is a protein found in foods like wheat, rye, oats and barley. It helps hold things like breads together and makes them soft. Casein is a protein found in dairy products, and one of the things that makes cheese melt.

Some doctors say these two proteins act like the drug opium in children with autism, impairing both the immune system and the brain.

"We're not 100 percent sure, but what's happening is that the body may not be completely breaking down those proteins," said Dr. Paul Nash, a nutritional wellness practitioner.

Nash, who is what's known as a "DAN" (defeat autism now) doctor, said the partially digested proteins are getting absorbed, which can have effects. DAN doctors believe gluten and casein can change how some kids on the autism spectrum think and act.

"They've done studies where they've injected lab animals with these compounds and they've seen behaviors similar to autism and schizophrenia," Nash said.

On the contrary, medical doctors have been slow to embrace the idea that the diet could change a child's behavior.

"I think a lot of it is just the history of what autism used to be thought of, as a behavior disorder and that there was no medical link," said Dr. Bryan Jepson, a biomedical expert on autism who is considered an expert in the biomedical field and practices at an autism-focused clinic called the Thoughtful House Center for Children in Texas.

Jepson is one doctor who said the diet does work, but that those in his profession are often skeptical. He said with some children, you can see an immediate response, but it will often take about a month or sometimes even a few months.

"I think a lot of the argument from the doctors would say well, it's expensive, it's hard, you're wasting money, it's a false hope," he said.

At the same time, Jepson said that, in reality, 60 to 70 percent of his patients who have tried it have in fact had a response.

Janette Johnson is cognizant of the controversy. When reporter Amelia Santaniello asked her what the traditional allergist said, she said he told her she was wasting her time, money, and socially impairing her child further than he was.

But like so many parents with kids on the spectrum, she was willing to try anything to help her son.

"His behavior has changed quite a bit," she said.

She said some parents say it is drastic, like if a child starts talking, but she thinks for Will it's more subtle. He now has better eye contact and talks to more people. During their interview, he told Santaniello he likes the food his mother makes for him.

"It's a lot of work on the parent to make sure that the child is getting what he needs," Johnson said.

At the same time, shopping, label reading and learning to cook a whole new way are getting easier. Penni Ruben, director of store operations at Lakewinds Natural Foods, said they do what their customers ask for. At Lakewinds, every item in the store is coded with colored dots.

"The green is wheat-free, the red is gluten-free, the yellow is yeast-free and the blue is dairy-free," Ruben said.

The store also hosts cooking classes for parents who are just starting out, taught by those who have experienced the same thing.

Cooking instructor Angela Litzinger, whose daughter is gluten-intolerant, said she does it because she doesn't want anybody to start from scratch.

"I think everybody deserves a cookie," she said.

Litzinger added that sometimes it is hard being a mother, and that having a kid with special needs can sometimes puts an extra layer of pressure on your time.

"I don't want anybody to start from scratch like I had to," she said.

Janette Johnson said the classes are a huge help and she is now experimenting with everything from brownies to rolls. She admits the diet is a lot of work and very expensive, upwards of $100 or more per month, but she doesn't think of it as a diet. She thinks of it as another therapy -- a food therapy.

"It's something that he needs to help his body so he can think and he can be better," she said.

Source: http://wcco.com:80/health/autism.diet.nutrition.2.779448.html