Health

Six Facts About Celiac Disease in the United States You Need to Know

by John Libonati

Here are six important facts about celiac disease in the United States:

1. Doctors do not understand celiac disease. 97% of celiacs are not diagnosed. Diagnosis takes over 10 years on average and follow up treatment is poor.

2. Doctors do not understand nutrition. Medical schools do not teach it, so doctors generally do not look for nutrient deficiencies unless you are emaciated.

3. Most of the 300 health problems stemming from celiac disease are due to nutrient deficiencies.

4. Comparing symptoms with one another does not work in celiac disease because symptoms change over time and everyone absorbs or malabsorbs nutrients differently. You may absorb everything but vitamin B12. Another person will not absorb calcium or vitamin D. Even siblings sometimes have totally different symptoms.

5. Symptoms from nutrient deficiencies show up before intestinal damage occurs, but also after starting the gluten-free diet depending on the degree of damage and quality of diet.

6. Most celiacs do not realize how sick they really are. They think, “This is me. I’ve always been this way.” They end up spending thousands of dollars on lotions, salves, medications and surgeries when the root of their problem has been a missing nutrient or nutrients all along.

You need to understand gluten and how celiac disease affects your body if you want to be healthy.

You must be able to identify health problems and the nutritional deficiencies that cause them so you can add the missing nutrients to your diet and inform your doctor to help him treat you.

You need the book, Recognizing Celiac Disease.

Recognizing Celiac Disease teaches you everything about gluten, celiac disease, the health problems it causes and what you need to fix them.

Thousands of celiacs around the world are using Recognizing Celiac Disease…because it works.

“Having been dx with CD for one year, I reached saturation – almost overload point a few months ago. Then I read the summary of “Recognizing Celiac Disease” and felt it might encompass everything I had referenced across numerous articles and books – and more. I love being able to look in the index and go to detailed information in my struggle to ensure my nutritional requirements and deficiencies are being met and addressed.” – Reta McCallum, TX

Read how this one of a kind book is helping others at www.recognizingceliacdisease.com.

Order your copy of Recognizing Celiac Disease today. Review it and bring it with you to your next doctor visit. This way you can work with your doctor to make sure you get the best treatment possible.

Visit www.recognizingceliacdisease.com for more information and to see what others are saying.

Six Steps to Safe Gluten Free Dining

Jen Cafferty Gluten Free Works Author

Gluten Free Restaurant

Copyright (c) 2012 Simone Marani

1.     Find a restaurant that can accommodate gluten free meals. Many restaurants are very familiar with gluten free meals or have a gluten free menu.  If you are new to gluten free dining, stick to a restaurant where you don’t have to explain yourself.  There is a list of gluten free restaurants at www.glutenfreerestaurants.org

 

2.     Do your homework ahead of time. Call ahead and speak with the chef and ask if the restaurant can accommodate your needs.  Also, review Read More »

Smoothie King Offers Gluten-free Choices

The idea for Smoothie King started back in the late 1960’s in the home of Steve Kuhnau.  Kuhnau was trying to remedy his allergies and low blood sugar and began to experiment with blending fruits, nutrients and proteins in a blender.  In 1973, Kuhnau opened a health food store selling his smoothies & vitamins and Smoothie King was born.  Smoothie King has grown to over 600 locations in the US and Seoul, Korea.  Smoothie King’s mission is “To relentlessly influence and help more & more people achieve a healthier lifestyle.”   Read More »

So the Doc says no gluten, answers to FAQs

For individuals just diagnosed with celiac disease or other gluten intolerant auto immunity issues, the prospects of learning a whole new way of eating can be daunting at first, especially for those eating the standard American diet (S.A.D.). Following are answers to a list of frequently asked questions:

What grains contain gluten?
Wheat, barley, rye, and any flours derived from these grains. There is controversy over oat’s status.

What are hidden sources of gluten?
Soy sauce (the second ingredient is wheat), barbecue sauce, marinades, teriyaki sauce, Asian sauces, or anything that contains soy sauce in the list of ingredients. Modified food starch, malted drinks, malt vinegar, most cold cereals, grain based veggie burgers, meatballs, breaded foods, durum and semolina pasta (another name for wheat flour), some seasoning blends, and many prepackaged foods.

What foods are safe to eat?
Most whole foods are safe, especially fruits, veggies, legumes, oils, nuts and seeds, and lean meats, and for some people, dairy. Safe grains include rice, corn, millet, tapioca, sorghum, teff, buckwheat (not related to wheat), potato starch, bean flours, nut flours, and coconut flour. Some people may tolerate gluten free oats, but caution is advised as there is controversy over their gluten free status. Visit this link for more information. Read More »

Stand Up for Your “Gluten-free” Self!

Interesting experience over this past weekend.  I went to a restaurant that offers gluten free pizza and buns and inquired with the bartender if they had gluten free beer. 

He proceeded to inform me that there is no such thing as gf beer because gf beer isn’t REAL beer and was a bit jerky about the whole thing.  He informed me that he brews his own beer, so he knows what real beer is. 

I was quite offended at this response, as I was ordering gluten free beer out of necessity, not out of Read More »

Staying Focused on Thanks!

As we approach Thanksgiving, I encourage you to spend a little time each day reflecting on what you are thankful for. 

It’s easy to get caught up in our life challenges and to start focusing on unfairness and negativity.  We often discount the positive and over analyze and give importance to the negative.  Even when struggling with life’s challenges, if we can Read More »

Surviving a Gluten Free Life

Gluten Free is heard everywhere nowadays.  It’s seems to be as popular as the vegan diet years ago.

Unfortunately gluten free is not a fad, or a diet, it is a way of life for those with Celiac Disease and gluten sensitivity.

gluten free livingThose of us, including myself, need to check everything that we eat which can honestly be a royal pain, but the good news is that most places are gluten aware.  There are those hole in the wall places in the middle of nowhere that we can never find anything to eat, but we can always pack a snack.

The first time that you go grocery shopping or out to eat can be overwhelming after being told that you Read More »

Surviving the Holidays Gluten-Free

 

 

It’s a season of love, joy, peace. . . and stress? For those us with restricted diets, the holidays can be a struggle, especially when we are sharing meals with those who don’t adhere to the same eating style as we do.    So how do we survive the holidays without sacrificing good times or our well-being?

It’s sad, but true, that many people who follow a specific diet (out of need or choice) opt to “check out” of holiday gatherings. Relationships are of such central importance in our lives, however, that we really shouldn’t let our dietary choices limit our interactions with others.  I’m happy to share that our family has successfully hosted holiday meals in our home for years and we’ve attended family gatherings and Read More »

Sweet Pot-Souffle Recipe

sarica cernohaus gluten free works

This is a great way to start the day on a sweeter note, without the sugars found in more traditional sweet morning fare—something that works great for those following a gluten-free–and even grain-free–lifestyle. It is packed with fiber, Vitamin A, protein and healthy fat. Use sweet potatoes or winter squash that has been pre-cooked to make preparation fast and easy–there should be plenty on hand, either before or after a Thanksgiving feast!  This is a dish that pleases young and old alike.

Serves 2

Ingredients:

• 1 cup cooked Sweet Potatoes or Winter Squash, skins removed

• 2-3 raw Eggs

• ½ cup unsweetened Almond Milk or Coconut Milk

• ½ tsp. ground Nutmeg

• ½ tsp. ground Cinnamon

• 1 tsp. Vanilla extract Read More »

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