Author Archives: Cindy Swan

Avoid gluten free dietary blunders

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For people with diagnosed celiac disease or autoimmune related gluten intolerance, eating a gluten free diet is not optional. It’s the only medical treatment currently available and requires 100 percent lifelong adherence.

In addition, other conditions frequently occur alongside celiac disease and gluten intolerance. Maintaining health requires attention to lifestyle behaviors and adequate nutrition that will improve quality of life and prevent complications. The following three tips will ensure success eating gluten free. Read More »

Three foods that should be part of any gluten free diet

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oliveoilDue to the malabsorption concerns all too commonly associated with Celiac disease and gluten intolerance, nutrient rich whole foods are a vital to the diet. In the early stages of a gluten free diet, the body is still healing, or there are other underlying autoimmune illnesses, so there may be some foods that initially are not tolerated well. Introduce those foods slowly. Start by including the following three foods, which are loaded with vital nutrients, are naturally gluten free, and can be used in endless recipe variations: Read More »

Gluten free and dairy free, 4 yummy recipes packed with calcium

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rice_puddingRead on to find a list of calcium rich foods your doctor forgot to tell you about…

Gluten free living for those with autoimmunity can be a challenge, but what if you’re also lactose intolerant, allergic to dairy, or intolerant to caseins? How many times have you been confronted with the question or personal concern of nutrition and adequate calcium intake? This is an especially legitimate concern for children, adolescents, pregnant and lactating women, postmenopausal women, and men and women at risk for osteoporosis and other bone diseases.

Are dairy products or supplements the only answer?

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So the Doc says no gluten, answers to FAQs

For individuals just diagnosed with celiac disease or other gluten intolerant auto immunity issues, the prospects of learning a whole new way of eating can be daunting at first, especially for those eating the standard American diet (S.A.D.). Following are answers to a list of frequently asked questions:

What grains contain gluten?
Wheat, barley, rye, and any flours derived from these grains. There is controversy over oat’s status.

What are hidden sources of gluten?
Soy sauce (the second ingredient is wheat), barbecue sauce, marinades, teriyaki sauce, Asian sauces, or anything that contains soy sauce in the list of ingredients. Modified food starch, malted drinks, malt vinegar, most cold cereals, grain based veggie burgers, meatballs, breaded foods, durum and semolina pasta (another name for wheat flour), some seasoning blends, and many prepackaged foods.

What foods are safe to eat?
Most whole foods are safe, especially fruits, veggies, legumes, oils, nuts and seeds, and lean meats, and for some people, dairy. Safe grains include rice, corn, millet, tapioca, sorghum, teff, buckwheat (not related to wheat), potato starch, bean flours, nut flours, and coconut flour. Some people may tolerate gluten free oats, but caution is advised as there is controversy over their gluten free status. Visit this link for more information. Read More »

Is gluten free the next weight loss fad diet?

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With increasing regularity folks are asking if they should start the “new” gluten free diet to lose weight. They’re serious. Too often eating plans designed to combat specific diseases become money making marketing machines in the form of weight loss fad diet products, usually with poor long term results.

cindy_swan_veggies Many people now see the gluten free labels in the health food section of the grocery store, the thin people reaching for them, and well, you see the fore drawn conclusion. What they don’t realize is that the thin person may have celiac disease or other autoimmune disorder, and he or she actually weighs a healthy 20 pounds more since starting a gluten free diet, putting an end to malabsorption problems. Conversely, some people do lose weight eating gluten free, not because they are using the lifestyle as a specific weight loss program, but because addressing their underlying disease resulted in improved body composition.

In the later case, weight loss may be a side benefit of removing the offending food, thus allowing the body time to heal and absorb nutrients normally. However, a gluten free lifestyle is not intended to be the next fad weight loss program. Consider two other dieting trends over the past two decades: Read More »

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