Archive for March, 2009

 


recognizing_celiac_disease_cover_lg1 The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center has chosen Recognizing Celiac Disease as the supplemental reading material for medical professionals who complete its Preceptorship Program.

Dr. Stefano Guandalini, medical director of the center, recommends the book for both patients and healthcare providers. “The book is useful for prospective patients to determine whether their complaints are consistent with celiac disease. It is also an excellent patient resource for self management, especially in identifying ongoing and future health problems related to celiac disease and bringing them to the attention of their physician for proper treatment. “Recognizing Celiac Disease” is a useful reference that will serve as a helpful tool for health care providers and anyone diagnosed with the disease.”

The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center's Preceptorship Program is an on-site intensive 2-day training course for medical professionals. Candidates study under the direction of the Center's celiac disease experts. The course includes formal instruction, as well as hands-on training. This is the nation's only such program. More information about the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center and the Preceptorship Program can be found at www.celiacdisease.net.

“Recognizing Celiac Disease” is the definitive guide to understanding, diagnosing and managing celiac disease. It is a reader-friendly, celiac disease reference manual written for both medical professionals and the general public.

For more information visit, www.recognizingceliacdisease.com.


John Libonati

Jenny McCarthy Is Gluten- and Dairy-Free and in Shape

March 27th, 2009 by John Libonati

In Shape magazine, that is — on the cover of the May issue. Actress, author, autism activist, and mother Jenny McCarthy said she ballooned to 211 pounds after the birth of her son, who's now 6 years old. Weight Watchers helped her slim down since it taught her about portion control and to be conscious of what she eats.

jenny-mccarthy_shape

Then three years ago she switched to a diet that's gluten- and dairy-free, to match her son Evan's diet. Not only did it help her shed even more weight, but it's greatly improved her son's autism symptoms. A typical day consists of an egg white omelet for breakfast, then for lunch and dinner she enjoys fresh fruit and veggies (she purées them to make her own soups) with fish. For snacks she loves “those little packets of nuts from Starbucks.” Jenny also stays strong and flexible by practicing yoga, and is even trying to teach it to her honey, Jim Carrey. Check out the May issue of Shape for her 15-minute yoga sculpting workout.

Source: http://www.fitsugar.com:80/2971971

John Libonati

Tips For Dining Out On The Gluten-Free Diet

March 4th, 2009 by John Libonati

By Melinda Dennis, MS, RD, LDN Nutrition Coordinator, Celiac Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Avoid ordering fried foods, such as French fries or taco “basket” shells at a Mexican restaurant, which are fried in the same oil as battered foods or coated fries.

Check to make sure that liquid eggs held in a buffet line for eggs-to-order are not mixed with wheat flour (to keep them from separating).

Ask your server to request that the cooks change their gloves and use a clean skillet and utensils to prepare your food.

If you don’t feel that your needs are being met, ask to speak with the chef or the manager. Carry a restaurant card (available from several of the national celiac support groups and online) that lists safe and prohibited food.

Rice and corn-based cuisines, such as Japanese, Thai, Indian or Mexican, usually have many more naturally gluten free items available than American fast food or standard fare.

If you are with a large group and you prefer not to draw attention to your special diet, order your meal last so that table conversation is flowing and you can take your time. Or excuse yourself and have your conversation with the chef or your server near the kitchen.

If you’ve had a wonderful meal, tip generously, thank the chef and server personally, and tell the restaurant you plan to share your good experience with fellow diners, the local celiac support group and your clinicians. As restaurants are alerted to the needs of those with celiac disease, gluten-free dining out will be more and more enjoyable.

Above content provided by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. http://www.bidmc.org/celiaccenter For advice about your medical care, consult your doctor.

Posted March 2009