Home / A LISTING OF ALL HEALTH CONDITIONS / Malabsorption Disorders

Malabsorption Disorders

This category comprises a wide array of disorders caused by one or more nutrient deficiencies. If our bodies cannot absorb needed nutrients, the malfunctioning that develops will be shown by symptoms. Understanding how nutrients work in the body gives us understanding of deficiency symptoms.

Vitality, Loss of

What Is Loss of Vitality? Loss of vitality is a state of diminished power to live or go on living, interfering with normal functioning and survival. As weakness and fatigue worsen, the affected person increasingly loses interest in surroundings, activites, and ...

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Cachexia

What Is Cachexia? Cachexia is a state of ill health involving deteriorating body composition that is characterized by general malnutrition and loss of lean tissue such as muscle. Q: What are typical findings in cachexia? A: Arm muscle triceps (the ...

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Cardiomegaly

What Is Cardiomegaly? Cardiomegaly is a non-inflammatory disorder of the myocardium (heart muscle) causing the heart to enlarge. Q: What happens when the heart enlarges? A:The heart enlarges because excessive growth of muscle tissue (hypertrophy) thickens the heart walls which in ...

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Nosebleeds, Unexplained (Epistaxis)

What Is Epistaxis? Epistaxis, or nosebleed, is a feature of secondary hemostasis (blood clotting) characterized by fragility of a plexus of blood vessels in the antero-inferior septum (just inside nostril) and/or abnormal blood coagulation. What Is Epistaxis In Celiac Disease ...

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Bruising, Easy (Ecchymosis)

What Is Easy Bruising? Ecchymosis, or easy bruising, is a feature of impaired secondary hemostasis (blood clotting) characterized by subcutaneous bleeding (under the skin) in response to light trauma. Q: What causes easy bruising? A: Easy bruising is the direct ...

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Neutropenia 

What Is Neutropenia? Neutropenia  is a blood disorder characterized by presence of an abnormally low number of neutrophils. Neutrophils are white blood cells (leukocytes) that serves as the primary defense against infections by destroying bacteria in the blood.  Specfically, neutrophils are ...

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Hypoprothrombinemia (Low Prothrombin Level)

What Is Hypoprothrombinemia? Hypoprothrombinemia is a deficiency of prothrombin (clotting factor II) in the blood that is characterized by impaired hemostasis in response to trauma or a laceration. Q: What is hemostasis and how is it altered by a deficiency of prothrombin? A: Hemostasis ...

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Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar)

hypoglycemia symptom of celiac disease and gluten

What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia means the level of glucose within cells is too low to meet metabolic needs of the body for this essential sugar. Q: What are the metabolic needs for glucose? A: Glucose is the most important simple ...

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Hypocupremia (Low Blood Copper Level)

hypocupremia low copper and celiac disease gluten symptom

What Is Hypocupremia? Hypocupremia, or low plasma copper, means the level of copper is too low to meet metabolic needs of the body for copper and is characterized by these many features: Impaired energy production causing weakness. Impaired ability as ...

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Hypocalcemia (Low Blood Calcium)

hypocalcemia celiac disease gluten symptom

What Is Hypocalcemia? Hypocalcemia, or low plasma calcium, means the level of calcium in blood is too low to meet metabolic needs of the body for calcium. Low blood calcium is characterized by bone and tooth demineralization (loss of calcium ...

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Coagulation Factors, Low

What Are Low Coagulation Factors? Coagulation factors II, VII, IX, X found in blood are essential for normal blood clotting.  Low coagulation factors on blood assay indicate an altered secondary coagulation disorder that is characterized by impaired clot formation. Each coagulation factor ...

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Cholesterol, Low 

What Is Low Cholesterol? Low cholesterol found in blood indicates an abnormal blood level of this essential lipid (fat) that is characterized by decreased production of steroid hormones and bile. Cholesterol is a soft, fat-like substance found in the bloodstream ...

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Vitamin K Deficiency

What Is Vitamin K? Vitamin K is a family of fat-soluble vitamins, called K vitamers, that exists in three forms: K1 is a natural form found in plants (phylloquinone); K2, found in some animal foods, is synthesized in the intestine ...

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Linoleic Acid (LA) Deficiency

What Is Linoleic Acid? Linoleic acid is an essential omega-6 fatty acid that comes from plant sources. Essential means the body must have it to maintain health and life sustaining functions. Omega-6 fatty acids are polyunsaturated. Among its many vital ...

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Glucose Deficiency

What Is Glucose? Glucose is the most important simple sugar in human metabolism because it is the primary source of energy for most cells of the body and is particularly required by the brain. Q: Where does glucose get energy? ...

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