Diet

Food Restrictions As Self-care

Cheryl Harris Gluten Free Works

food restrictions as self-care

Photo: Cheryl Harris

On the surface, “restricting” and “self-care” sound like polar opposites and I know this is such a core issue that so many of us experience in the gluten-free community.  Generally we think of restrictions as a way of saying “no”, of controlling and denying. I’m sure everyone knows or has seen someone take even concepts about healthy eating and eating the “right foods”, and push them too far.  Yet for people with food allergies, Celiac, gluten sensitivity, etc., food restrictions can really be a way of simply living more fully, or taking better care of health.  Chances are if you’re on this blog, you know where I’m coming from.

I hate the idea of “dieting”—the regimented set of rules that are about contorting and what you do until you lose enough weight so that you can Read More »

Food Strategies For Newbies: A Day in the Gluten-Intolerant Life

gluten-free-claire-harrison

When I became a gluten-sensitive newbie a year ago, I couldn’t figure out what I’d eat on a day-by-day basis.

This hadn’t been a problem when I became lactose-intolerant because so many alternatives to cow’s milk products were in the grocery stores. Nor had it been a diet problem because my program (Weight Watchers) was not restrictive in choice, just in portion size.

But gluten-sensitivity (and also a problem with oats, alas) threw me into a complete tizzy. So many of my favorite foods were out the window. What was I going to eat at breakfast? For lunch? What about when I just wanted to grab a snack? Read More »

Gluten – What It Is And How To Find It In Your Food

Erika Krull Gluten Free Works

Gluten is the trouble-making ingredient you’re supposed to avoid when going on a gluten free diet.  But how do you avoid something if you aren’t sure what it is or where to find it?  I’ll admit, this can be a challenge.  It’s just not as obvious I’d like it to be, but once you learn how to spot it you’ll feel more confident about grocery shopping.  Also, knowing what gluten is and how it works in food can help you understand how to cook with gluten free ingredients.

What Is This Gluten Stuff?

Gluten is the stretchy glue that helps bread, pizza crust, and other baked goods get nice puffy air pockets.  It creates a flexible structure that helps each baked good hang together without necessarily being tough or chewy.  When a baker knows how to properly activate the gluten protein, it will start doing its thing. The presence of gluten has influenced baking techniques for decades, even centuries.   Sorry, I’m not trying to build up gluten as some kind of magical essence that turns good food into great food.  It’s just one of many ingredients with useful properties out there in the world.  It happens that wheat is commonly grown and used across the world, and it affects a lot of food in Western cultures.

Ready for a little science?  Gluten is made up of two types of proteins – one is the Read More »

Gluten Free 101: Surviving Halloween

Cafferty_Jen_Chicago_IL

 

 

 

Halloween can be a difficult holiday to navigate for a gluten-free child or allergic child. Here are some tips for an easy gluten-free Halloween and some great sources for gluten-free Halloween candy.

halloween-swirl-lollipop-125
Organize a Gluten-Free Halloween Party for Kids
Kids love parties, especially when they can eat all the goodies. Host a party where everything is safe for your child. Carve pumpkins, have a costume contest, and eat gluten-free Halloween treats (such as Halloween Sugar Cookies.) Inexpensive party supplies and art supplies can be purchased online at www.orientaltrading.com. Read More »

Gluten Free Christmas Fruit Cake Recipe

Erin Emms gluten free works

Fruit Cake seems to be one of those things that you either love, or you hate. Personally I also find them really hard to bake and not have them dry out, so this year was a double challenge to make the perfect gluten free fruit cake without it drying out. Like most recipes it’s a personal taste on what you’d like to add, obviously if you have a nut allergy you can exclude those. If you like your cake frosted with frosting you can also do that too.

Enjoy!

Read More »

Gluten free diet cards from Glutenfreeworks.com

gluten-free-diet-card-3-images-lrge

Glutenfreeworks.com has comprehensive gluten-free diet cards that lists unsafe foods and ingredients (including hidden) broken down by categories: whole grains & cereals, flours, thickeners, sweeteners, distilled spirits, fermented, cooked products, baked products, protein polymers, brewed, germ/bran and other.

Gluten-Free Diet Cards make dining out and shopping for groceries easy. These cards are perfect for eating out at restaurants or comparing ingredient labels when shopping for groceries. No more long explanations to waiters and managers. Just hand them the card. They’ll compare the ingredients to their recipes and let you know what you can have. No more wondering if an ingredient is safe or not when shopping. Just check it against your Gluten Free Works Diet Card. (Always call the company though if you’re unsure!)

The cards are 4″ by 3 1/2″ and fold to wallet size. See what they look like here. Gluten Free Diet Cards

They cost $6.50 for 5 cards, $30 for 25 cards, or $50 for 50 cards. Shipping is included in the price.

You can also get 5 free Gluten-free diet cards when you order a copy of Recognizing Celiac Disease.

Gluten Free Diets May Reduce Autistic Behavior

                                                  

The CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network released data in 2007 that found about 1 in 150 (8-year-old) children in multiple areas of the United States had an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The number of diagnosed cases of autism is on the rise; the reason(s) for this is unclear.   Autism knows no racial, ethnic or social boundaries.  Family income, lifestyle, and educational levels do not appear to affect the chance of occurrence.

Fortunately, dietary changes can make a significant change in people with autism.  Research is profound on the positive impact that a gluten and casein free diet can make on children with autism.  Gluten and/or casein free diets have been implemented to reduce autistic behavior, in addition to special education, since the early eighties {Autism, Vol. 3, No. 1, 45-65 (1999)}.  The scientific studies include Read More »

>