Eating Out

Stand Up for Your “Gluten-free” Self!

Interesting experience over this past weekend.  I went to a restaurant that offers gluten free pizza and buns and inquired with the bartender if they had gluten free beer. 

He proceeded to inform me that there is no such thing as gf beer because gf beer isn’t REAL beer and was a bit jerky about the whole thing.  He informed me that he brews his own beer, so he knows what real beer is. 

I was quite offended at this response, as I was ordering gluten free beer out of necessity, not out of Read More »

Surviving a Gluten Free Life

Gluten Free is heard everywhere nowadays.  It’s seems to be as popular as the vegan diet years ago.

Unfortunately gluten free is not a fad, or a diet, it is a way of life for those with Celiac Disease and gluten sensitivity.

gluten free livingThose of us, including myself, need to check everything that we eat which can honestly be a royal pain, but the good news is that most places are gluten aware.  There are those hole in the wall places in the middle of nowhere that we can never find anything to eat, but we can always pack a snack.

The first time that you go grocery shopping or out to eat can be overwhelming after being told that you Read More »

Surviving the Holidays Gluten-Free

 

 

It’s a season of love, joy, peace. . . and stress? For those us with restricted diets, the holidays can be a struggle, especially when we are sharing meals with those who don’t adhere to the same eating style as we do.    So how do we survive the holidays without sacrificing good times or our well-being?

It’s sad, but true, that many people who follow a specific diet (out of need or choice) opt to “check out” of holiday gatherings. Relationships are of such central importance in our lives, however, that we really shouldn’t let our dietary choices limit our interactions with others.  I’m happy to share that our family has successfully hosted holiday meals in our home for years and we’ve attended family gatherings and Read More »

The Gluten-Free Game of Clue

In the Game of Clue, players must solve the mystery of who killed Mr. Boddy, what they used to commit the crime, and where this occurred. A similar version of these three questions is something that gluten-free folks are used to finding out.

Who prepared the food?

What utensils did they use?

Where did they prepare it?

When I dine out, I’m always sure to remind the server, “They cannot prepare my sandwich on the same counter,” or when I’m at Chipotle, “Could you please change your gloves? I am gluten free.” These are comments that MUST be made in order to ensure safety and reduce the risk of cross-contamination.

I figured we’d have some fun and make a gluten-free version of this classic detective game because that’s what we all need to be – gluten-free detectives! When dining out, there are different places one can be glutened and there are different weaponsof contamination. No matter who did it, where it happened, or what caused the contamination, the end result is always the same – the victim is glutened.

Gluten-Free Game of Clue: How was I glutened?

gluten free game of clue

If dining at a restaurant that serves both gluten-filled and gluten-free food (which is just about every restaurant we can eat at), the opportunity to be glutened is everywhere. The key to a safe dining experience for a gluten-free individual is Read More »

Tips For Dining Out On The Gluten-Free Diet

By Melinda Dennis, MS, RD, LDN
Nutrition Coordinator, Celiac Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Avoid ordering fried foods, such as French fries or taco “basket” shells at a Mexican restaurant, which are fried in the same oil as battered foods or coated fries.

Check to make sure that liquid eggs held in a buffet line for eggs-to-order are not mixed with wheat flour (to keep them from separating).

Ask your server to request that the cooks change their gloves and use a clean skillet and utensils to prepare your food.

If you don’t feel that your needs are being met, ask to speak with the chef or the manager. Carry a restaurant card (available from several of the national celiac support groups and online) that lists safe and prohibited food.

Rice and corn-based cuisines, such as Japanese, Thai, Indian or Mexican, usually have many more naturally gluten free items available than American fast food or standard fare.

If you are with a large group and you prefer not to draw attention to your special diet, order your meal last so that table conversation is flowing and you can take your time. Or excuse yourself and have your conversation with the chef or your server near the kitchen.

If you’ve had a wonderful meal, tip generously, thank the chef and server personally, and tell the restaurant you plan to share your good experience with fellow diners, the local celiac support group and your clinicians. As restaurants are alerted to the needs of those with celiac disease, gluten-free dining out will be more and more enjoyable.

Above content provided by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.
http://www.bidmc.org/celiaccenter
For advice about your medical care, consult your doctor.

Posted March 2009

Top 10 Gluten-free Baked Goods a Restaurant Brunch Menu Should Offer

Breakfast is one of the easiest meals to make at home, but it also the one this Examiner used to enjoy ordering out.  It seems now that breakfast is the one meal with limited gluten-free choices, so we tend to eat this meal at home.  Who can afford to spend more than $10 for eggs, bacon and potatoes when they can be prepared at home for a fraction of the cost. 

Brunch menus tend to vary, but when we go out to brunch we are looking for more than just egg dishes, meat, potatoes and fruit.  A traditional brunch menu should offer a gluten-free version of what you would normally expect: pancakes, toast, French toast, eggs Benedict, Read More »

Top 10 Ways to Eat Gluten-free Safely for the Holidays

1)  Never assume.  Just because your host knows you’re on a special diet doesn’t mean they understand the nuances of your lifestyle.  Ask to see packages of foods before you eat them.

2)  Bring a protein-based dish to your next gathering.  That way, you know there will be something safe to eat, and you won’t be hungry.  Click here for a Holiday Read More »

Top Ten Gluten Free Tips for Safe Outdoor Parties and Barbecues

Barbecue and outdoor party season has arrived.  It is the time of year when we want to relax and enjoy time with friends.  But having food allergies and issues can put a damper on your party plans.  Here are ten ways to dine safely at an outdoor party.

Outdoor Gluten-free Grilling Courtesy: dreamstime.com

1. Never show-up without something safe to eat
Always make sure there is something safe for you to eat at any event. offer to bring a salad or side dish. Make a quinoa salad that everyone will love.   That way you know there is something with protein to eat that will keep you full.  If you bring a dish that is just carbohydrates, you’ll be hungry before the party is over. Read More »

>