Monthly Archives: June 2017

Don’t be a Statistic. Medical Mistakes are the Third Leading Cause of Death in the United States.

13502036_10154102429271815_7497922383029815833_n[1]A recent Johns Hopkins study found medical mistakes are the third leading cause of death in the United States, killing between 200,000 and 400,000 per year.

The study does not even consider misdiagnoses, or how many people suffer injuries without dying. We frequently see people who are medicated for what doctors think are diseases, but are actually symptoms with underlying causes. This is why we created the Gluten Free Works Health Guide – to improve proper diagnosis and treatment – so you and your doctor could connect the dots between hundreds of symptoms and their causes, causes like nutrient deficiencies that doctors do not recognize.

“Medical mistakes — from surgical disasters to accidental drug overdoses — are the No. 3 cause of death in the U.S., behind cancer and heart disease, two experts argued Wednesday.

They said a careful count of all deaths from preventable medical errors shows between 200,000 and 400,000 people a year die in the U.S. from these mistakes. The only way to get the country to do something about them is to start counting them, Dr. Martin Makary and Michael Daniel of Johns Hopkins University medical school argued.

“We spend a lot of money on cancer and heart disease but we have not even recognized that medical error is the third leading cause of death in the United States,” Makary told NBC News.

“We have not as a country recognized the endemic problem of people dying from the care that they receive rather than the illness or injury for which they seek care.” Read the rest of the story at NBC News. The case report is available at the New England Journal of MedicineRead More »

Osteomalacia in Adult Celiac Disease

Osteomalacia is common in celiac disease. Osteomalacia can occur at any age. It children, it is called rickets.  It is a metabolic bone disorder that involves slow loss of minerals from bone tissue throughout the skeleton, stemming from inadequate absorption of vitamin D. As minerals are dissolved from bone tissue to provide for essential functions elsewhere in the body, bones gradually lose their hardness.

Consequently, pronounced softening of the bones characterizes osteomalacia. Soft bones become deformed, especially bones of the arms, legs, spine, thorax and pelvis. The softer bones have a normal amount of collagen, a strong fibrous protein in the bone matrix (osteoid) that gives bone its structure and tensile capacity, but there is not sufficient calcium and phosphate minerals available to properly mineralize or be deposited in the osteoid to give it necessary hardness. Read More »

Top 3 gluten-free myths, debunked

If you’re looking to start a gluten-free diet, or to simply experiment with gluten-free eating for the new year, make sure you aren’t distracted or discouraged by the common myths surrounding GF lifestyles. These myths can be deterrents to better health and make you question your commitment.

The top three myths are easily debunked because they don’t take the reality of naturally gluten-free foods that everyone already eats and enjoys into consideration. With so many people already eating gluten-free and experiencing thriving health, don’t let a few misconceptions stand in your way. Read More »

Gluten Free Burrito Casserole Recipe

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Finished burrito casserole; get the tortilla recipe in The Warm Kitchen

When you’re craving a burrito, is it really that gluten-containing tortilla  you’re after?  My guess is that it’s actually the hearty combination of fillings–the rice, beans, cheese, meat, etc. that got your mouth watering in the first place. Sure you could always make or buy gluten-free tortillas, but why not take a twist on the classic and ditch the burrito shell all together?

This recipe comes straight from my cookbook, The Warm Kitchen. This recipe is versatile, family-friendly and cooks up in about 20 minutes. Dinner is served!

 

Gluten-Free Burrito Casserole

Serves 4-6

Make sure your saute pan is hot first then add the ground meat to get the meat nice and brown

Make sure your saute pan is hot first then add the ground meat to get the meat nice and brown

Ingredients Read More »

Gluten-Free Frozen Strawberry Yogurt Pie Recipe

gluten free frozen strawberry yogurt pie

Gluten-Free Frozen Strawberry Yogurt Pie 2010 (c) Teri Lee Gruss

Here’s a light and delicious no-bake recipe for a refreshing summer pie. Make Gluten-Free Frozen Strawberry Pie several days in advance and keep it in the freezer — a real convenience when you’re planning a summer gathering!

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 15 minutes

Yield: 6-8 servings

Ingredients:

  • 3 – 8 ounce cartons strawberry yogurt
  • 3/4 cup whipping cream Read More »

Recipe: Gluten-free Brookies from McCormick

brookies

 

Do you know what a brookie is? I didn’t before I received a recipe from McCormick. A brookie is a combination of brownie batter and cookie dough, which creates a half chocolate chip and half brownie cookie, or the best of both worlds. I don’t usually post recipes, but when I find one that ‘speaks’ to me like this one, then I feel compelled to share it.

After getting permission from the lovely folks at McCormick, I give you the recipe (makes five dozen) for the brookie: Read More »

Chocolatey Hazelnut Sticky Buns

I have been so excited about the feedback and inspiration that the sticky buns have generated that I decided that we need one more take at these… something hazelnut – something chocolatey. Read More »

Crayola Crayons & Other Gluten-Free Crayola Products

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[Editor’s Note: Updated June 9, 2017]

According to Crayola’s safety specialists, only the crayola dough is made using gluten (wheat). That said, she told us the modeling compounds are made in the same location, therefore cross contamination is possible. The following statement can be found in Crayola’s FAQ on this page.

Do Crayola productcontain Gluten?

Crayola Dough is the only product manufactured with wheat (flour) as an ingredient.  All other Crayola products, including Silly Putty, do not contain wheat or other grains known to be a source of gluten.  Since most of our modeling compounds are made in the same manufacturing facility, there is a very slight chance of cross contamination.

[Previous Answer from Crayola. May 5, 2009]

The question was raised regarding gluten-free crayons and what type are gluten-free. We contacted Crayola to determine the gluten-free status of their crayons and other products. See below. Please note that Crayola licenses their name to other manufacturers, bath products, cooking products, etc. Crayola only knows the gluten-free status of products they make. If the product is not made by them, the manufacturer should be contacted directly.

Question:

Hi Glutenfreeworks.

I am looking for a gluten-free crayons. I wonder whether you have one or if not could you give me some idea where can I get it from? Thank you and await your reply.
-I.

Answer:

Crayola crayons are gluten-free. We just spoke with a safety representative at the company. Their crayons do not contain wheat, barley, rye or oats. They are also not made on a manufacturing line that uses any of these grains.

The only products Crayola manufactures that contain, or may contain, gluten are their Crayola Dough and modeling compounds. The Crayola Dough contains wheat. The modeling compounds are made on the same line after a thorough wash using a gluten-free cleaner.

The following information can be found on the Crayola website. Crayola
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The exact ingredients of our products are proprietary, however, we are happy to provide you with the 7 most common ingredient requests NOT FOUND in products currently manufactured by Crayola–This does not include products manufactured under license. Please check packaging carefully to determine manufacturing company.

Peanuts
Shellfish
Fish
Tree Nuts
Eggs
Milk
Latex

(Latex gloves are one of the personal protection options requested by and available to our employees for the occasional handling of raw materials and finished goods during the product manufacturing process.)

***We are often asked if any of our products contain gluten (wheat flour). Gluten is contained only in Crayola Dough. Other Crayola modeling materials, including Model Magic modeling compound, Modeling Clay, Air-Dry Clay, and Model Magic Fusion are gluten free. All of these products, however, are produced on the same machinery. Although the machines are cleaned prior to the start of each production run, there is a slight possibility that trace amounts of gluten from Crayola Dough may be present in the other modeling compound products.***

For information regarding specific ingredients not listed, please call us at 1-800-272-9652 weekdays between 9 AM and 4 PM Eastern Time.
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