Monthly Archives: May 2010

Gluten Sensitivity (Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity)

Gluten Sensitivity is an umbrella term defined as “any and all problematic health responses to gluten in any body system.” (Recognizing Celiac Disease, p. IX)

Anyone can experience Gluten Sensitivity as a normal immune response to the abnormal presence of gluten in blood or body tissues.

Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity can develop if gluten, or rather, harmful partially digested fragments of gluten, wrongly pass through the small intestinal lining into our bloodstream.  From the blood, these protein fragments can harm any of our body tissues.

Factors Leading to Gluten Sensitivity Reactions

Two important factors that may subject non-celiac people to a gluten sensitivity reaction are high gluten load, and increased permeability of the small intestinal lining, also called “Leaky Gut Syndrome.”

1.  High Gluten load

A high gluten load simply means we are eating a diet that contains too much gluten. Of course, the more gluten we eat, the greater is the risk of protein fragments entering our bloodstream.

2.  Increased Permeability of the Small Intestinal Lining (Leaky Gut Syndrome)

Gluten may drive the immune system, even outside the gastrointestinal tract (extra-intestinal), to cause other diseases that we don’t call celiac disease, but which are still derived from gluten.1 Studies reveal extra-intestinal manifestations with positive blood tests for anti-gliadin antibodies without evidence of celiac disease.  This finding indicates gluten entering the bloodstream via increased membrane permeability of the small intestine.

Increased Intestinal Permeability (Leakage)

Increased permeability of the small intestinal lining, also called hyperpermeability, refers to alteration of the complex barrier system that separates what’s in our gut from the rest of our body. This protective system determines what substances may be allowed to cross from the inside of our small intestine to our bloodstream. An abnormal barrier allows harmful substances to “permeate” into deeper layers of the intestinal wall and into the bloodstream.

The major defense of the barrier system against permeation by harmful substances is comprised of tight intercellular junctions. Tight junctions (TJ) refer to the regulated spaces between enterocytes (cells forming the surface lining of our small intestine), causing these cells to closely adhere to each other, side-by-side. Disruption of TJ allows harmful substances such as gluten fragments to slip through them.

Only a single layer of epithelial cells separates the contents of our small intestine from the lamina propria (underlying tissues of the small intestine) and the rest of our body. Breaching of this single layer of cells can expose effector immune cells located in the lamina propria to a myriad of microorganisms and food antigens, leading to immune reactions.2

Breakdown of the barrier is implicated in the pathogenesis (development) of acute illnesses such as bacterial translocation leading to sepsis and multiple organ failure. It also has been implicated in several auto-immune disease, including Celiac Disease, Type I Diabetes Mellitus, Autism, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, and atopic disorders such as Asthma, Rhinitis, Eczema, and Allergies.3

Factors Other Than Gluten That Disrupt Tight Intercellular Junctions?

  • Gastrointestinal infections from microbes such as rotavirus, parasites, pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile toxins), and mycotoxins (toxins produced by fungi found in stored grain and dried fruit).
  • Fats such as rancid fats, sodium caprate, a medium-chain fat, and sucrose monester fatty acid, a food-grade surfactant, induce significant disruption.
  • Foods such as alcohol, lactose, caffeine, paprika, cayenne pepper, refined carbohydrates, some food preservatives and food additives.
  • Medications such as oral antibiotics, NSAIDS (eg, Aspirin, Advil), corticosteroids, and oral contraceptives.
  • Psychological stress, oxidative stress
  • Intense exercise
  • Aging

Restoring Tight Intercellular Junctions

Correction of the factors that cause Tight Junction disruption and eating a gluten-free diet with foods that have been shown to restore Tight Junction function after injury, such as:

  • EPA and gamma linolenic acid (omega-3 fatty acids).
  • Butyrate  (a short-chain fatty acid).
  • Glutamine (an essential amino acid).
  • Black pepper and nutmeg.

Health Problems That Can Develop?

Mild problems that may come and go include irritability, sluggishness, tiredness, achiness, the “blues”, fatigue, and disinterest in things that should cause interest. With less mental acuity and drive, a person with these symptoms may feel like a “couch potato.” Others may say things like, “What’s got into you?” or “You never want to do things anymore.” Or “You don’t take care of the house like you used to do.” Children may not pay attention, whine or cry alot.

Gluten can wreak havoc throughout the body if leakiness is severe or prolonged. Gluten can affect the mind causing problems like depression and anxiety. Thinking difficulties may develop such as poor attention, judgment and memory or outright confusion. Behavioral problems may include hyperactivity or inappropriate social interaction. In some people, psychotic symptoms can develop which may be reversed on a gluten-free diet. Read more…Symptom Guide.

Gluten Can Have a Harmful Effect on the Mind

When gluten is broken down in the intestines during digestion, peptides are formed.  Certain peptides, called Gluten Exorphine and Gliadorphin, mimic the effects of morphine on the brain if they abnormally enter the bloodstream.  People who are unable to break down these peptides may experience mental health problems.

The same gut-brain mechanism that allows oral medications used to treat mental problems, such as depression, to enter the brain also allows gluten to enter. Neuoroactive compounds [substances that affect the brain] derived from within the intestine can permeate either diseased or healthy mucosa, cross the blood-brain barrier and cause psychiatric, cognitive and behavioral disturbances.4 Both gluten and beta-casein in milk are neuroactive compounds that cross the intestinal lining into the bloodstream and cause the mental symptoms in susceptible people such as autism and schizophrenia.  When gluten is the cause of schizophrenia, studies show that symptoms disappear in 2 weeks but will reappear in 3 days if gluten is again ingested.

What other problems can develop from gluten in the bloodstream?

Wherever gluten goes, it alarms our immune system to react because it damages any tissue it touches. When our body surrounds and encloses it, we form granulomas. These hard nodules can develop in the liver, joints, and skin. Granulomas are like pearls formed by an oyster. Our body encapsulates gluten to keep it from hurting our tissues much like an oyster does a grain of sand that lodges inside of it.

The longer we eat gluten, the greater is our risk of developing other auto-immune disorders such as, Alopecia Areata (hair loss), Psoriasis (skin disorder), Addison’s Disease (adrenal gland disorder), Grave’s Disease (hyperthyroid disorder) and Auto-immune Hepatitis (liver disorder).

In auto-immune disorders, the development of anti-gliadin antibodies may be attributed to the response to food protein [from gluten] and is often not closely related with Celiac Disease. 1

What should I do if I think I have this problem?

If you suspect you have this problem, see your doctor.  He may want to rule out Celiac Disease because Leaky Gut Syndrome is a part of this disorder.  In either condition, blood tests for anti-gliadin antibodies can be done that specifically test for gluten.  Other tests that determine Increased Intestinal Permeability (Leaky Gut) include Breath Hydrogen Test and Sugar Absorption Test.  Both of these tests are simple. Read more…Diagnosis and Testing

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  1. Kamaeva OL, Reznikov IP, Pimenova NS, Dobritsyna LV. Antigliadin antibodies in the absence of celiac disease.
  2. Fahardi A, Banan A, Fields J, Keshavarzian A. Intestinal barrier: an interface between health and disease. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2003; 18: 479-497.
  3. Liu Z, Li N, and New J. Tight Junctions, leaky intestines, and pediatric diseases. Acta Pediatrica, 2005;94:386-393.
  4. Wakefield AJ, Puleston JM, Montgomery SM, Anthony A, O’leary JJ, Murch SH. Review article: the concept of entero-colonic encephalopathy, autism and opiod receptor ligands. Blackwell Science Ltd, Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2002; 16:663-674.

Columbia University Celiac Disease Center Roundtable Discussion June 7

This just in from the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University…

The Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University will continue to host a Roundtable on Celiac Disease that deals with individuals and their families’ difficulties in living with celiac disease. The program will be held monthly and would deal with children, adolescence and adult issues with respect to celiac disease.

Members of the Celiac Disease Center who will be attending the Roundtable on Celiac Disease include adult and pediatric gastroenterologists as well as our nutritionist. We will conduct this program in an interactive format allowing airing of views and questions from all participants. Read More »

Our Pets, Gluten and Irritable Bowel Disease

They might be furry and walk on four legs, but they’re family just the same and we oftentimes treat them like our kids. I’m talking about our pets. Well, it seems our pets are even more like us than we thought. Dogs, cats and even other animals like guinea pigs can have food sensitivity issues just like humans leading to digestive problems.

Diane Haggar’s black Labrador, Maddie, suffered from frequent diarrhea, weight loss and terrible smelling gas. The diagnosis was Irritable Bowel Disease and an elimination diet was performed that found gluten to be the problem. A change to a gluten-free diet resulted in a complete remission of symptoms within a few weeks. “We had to be especially careful to inform family, friends and the doggie day care people about Maddie’s diet. She gets sick for a few days with diarrhea, even if she only gets a little bit.” Read More »

Upcoming Gluten-Free Events at Whole Foods at The District

Get started on the right foot this summer by checking out these special gluten-free events at Whole Foods located in The District (located off Jamboree and Park in Tustin).

Thursday, June 3rd: Learn what it means to be “going gluten-free”
Elizabeth Kaplan, founder of The Pure Pantry will be on hand to answer questions, provide her favorite recipes, and let you know what it really means to go gluten-free. There will also be food samples and a Q&A for those who are new to the gluten-free lifestyle. You won’t want to miss this special event.

Read More »

Conte’s Pasta Company Satisfies Gluten Free Pasta Cravings

Are you craving something delicious and gluten free, but you’re fed up with putting down hard earned money for disappointing products that are tasteless and sometimes even contaminated? Are you wishing you could actually enjoy eating something gourmet…and worry free? Yet, you haven’t got the time, energy or ingredients in your pantry?

Well, look no further and despair no more. Turns out your crazy cravings aren’t really crazy after all! The truth is, what you’ve been dreaming of is actually perfectly understood in Vineland, New Jersey!

Introducing Mike Conte and Conte’s Pasta Company! They’ve just set a wonderful new standard for gluten-free dining. Read More »

9th Annual Gluten Free Picnic in Neptune New Jersey

 Seashore Celiac Support Group CSA #96 and Central Jersey Celiac/DH Support Group and Cel-Kids Network CSA#58 is pleased to announce their 9th annual…

100% Gluten Free Picnic!!!

Date: Sunday June 27, 2010 (Rain or Shine)
Time: 1 to 5pm
Where: Shark River Park – Neptune, NJ
Directions: http://seashoreceliacs.org/SharkRiver.htm

All family & friends of celiacs are welcome! Read More »

Chronically-ill? Could Your Problem Be as Simple as Untreated Celiac Disease?

 Identifying celiac disease may seem simple enough. After all, there are tests your doctor can perform to determine if your body is reacting to gluten, the grain protein that those with celiac disease cannot tolerate. However, it is becoming more and more accepted that celiac disease may not always present as classic gut symptoms. Instead, celiac disease can cause and contribute to other diseases, deficiencies, ailments, and conditions. Because of this, some people with celiac disease may be diagnosed with diseases that could have been prevented or can be eliminated by a simple gluten-free diet. In other words, celiac is often considered the “root cause” of other conditions, even though it is seldom tested for in chronically-ill people. Read More »

Review: University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center Annual Spring Flours Benefit

Saturday, May 14th was an evening of fabulous food and fundraising for the University of Chicago’s Celiac Disease Center at the 10th Annual Spring Flours Benefit which was held at the Swissôtel in downtown Chicago. The center is completely funded by donations and this event it vital in keeping the center at the forefront of celiac research, education and advocacy.

The event began with a presentation of the celiac Iceberg Award to the founder of the Center, Stefano Guandalini, MD., with the help of Amy Lukas, one of the very first celiac patients in the clinic. This was followed by silent and live auction events and unlimited dinning possibilities. Read More »

Celiac Disease Event Features Nutritionist at Paoli Hospital May 17

The Chester County Gluten Intolerance Group’s quarterly meeting will be this Monday, May 17, in the Potter Room at Paoli Hospital.

Paoli Hospital
255 W. Lancaster Ave.
Paoli, PA 19301
Directions: http://www.mainlinehealth.org/paoli

Vendors start at 6:30, speaker at 7:15.

The featured speaker will be Nancy Dickens, registered dietician. Nancy Dickens is
recommended by the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. Read More »

The Easiest Dessert…Is Gluten Free

This is one of the best desserts I’ve ever made and its incredibly easy and impossible to mess up and of course, gluten free.

I have been trying things out of Alicia Silverstone’s book, The Kind Diet: A simple Guide to Feeling Great, Losing Weight, and Saving the Planet. All of the recipes are vegan, but they also use awesome alternatives to using refined sugar all while still enjoying delicious treats. Read More »

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