Monthly Archives: November 2009

Is turkey gluten-free? Here is a List That Is

Bouldin_Kimberly_Columbus_OH

Turkey2_225x225With Thanksgiving coming up this week, it is important to know which turkeys are gluten-free and safe to eat. The issue with a turkey being gluten-free is usually in the gravy packet, if there is one. Solution? Make your own from scratch. Use the broth from the cooked turkey or canned, gluten-free chicken broth & thicken with cornstarch.

Here is a list of turkeys that are free of gluten: Read More »

Butterball turkey gravy packets are now gluten-free

[Update November 19, 2018: All of the Butterball products are gluten free except for Butterball Stuffed Turkey (bread stuffing) and Butterball Frozen Meatballs.  For our products that are packaged with gravy packets, the gravy packets are gluten free as well. The gravy contains rice flour instead of wheat flour and the modified food starch is corn based. Source: Butterball.]

turkeyThere has been some confusion lately about whether or not Butterball turkey gravy packets are gluten-free. There are six types of Buttterball turkeys that come with a gravy packet. They are listed below and all currently come with a gluten-free gravy packet. The key to understanding if your gravy packet is gluten-free is to READ the label.

Any newly manufactured gravy packet will contain rice flour. According to Butterball (1-800-BUTTERBALL) there are still some older packets of gravy in the stores that contain wheat flour. Therefore, read your packet and make sure it does not contain wheat flour. If it contains wheat flour, you have an older packet and it is therefore not gluten-free. In the future, all of the Butterball gravy packets will be manufactured using rice flour. Read More »

Give thanks for a gluten free Thanksgiving, Part 3

Deitemeyer_Trish_Philadelphia_PA

No need to be jealous of your gluten-eating family and friends at Thanksgiving dessert; there are lots of gluten free options that will be the perfect ending to your perfect Turkey Day.

pumpkinpieNo one does GF baking better, in my opinion, than Jules Shepard of Jules Gluten Free Flour Mix. Watch her video (below) on making her perfect pie crust.

Now that you know how to make crust, try some of these delicious fillings:

Here’s the pumpkin pie recipe that’s been on the Libby’s Pumpkin label since 1950.

Apply Crumbly Pie

• 1 Jules’ pie crust (uncooked)
• 6 cups thinly sliced apples (Granny Smith or other tart apple)
• 1 tablespoon lemon juice
• 3/4 cup sugar
• 1 tablespoon GF flour
• 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
• 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
• 1/2 cup raisins (optional)
• 1/2 cup chopped walnuts (optional)
• 1/2 cup GF flour
• 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
• 3 tablespoons butter Read More »

Give thanks for a gluten free Thanksgiving, Part 2

Deitemeyer_Trish_Philadelphia_PA

Gluten free side dishes

funyunsWhat’s Thanksgiving without side-dishes? Just plain ol’ turnkey dinner, right? Fortunately, lots of side dishes are naturally gluten free, like mashed potatoes and most sweet potato recipes, and either canned or fresh cranberry sauce. Sadly, it’s our old favorites that are gluten-FULL. Read on for some GF tweaks to these classic recipes.

Green Bean Casserole

Don’t panic! You can still have your Green Bean Casserole, just substitute the cream of mushroom soup for this recipe from The Gluten Free Cooking School, or try Progresso’s Cream of Mushroom soup. Don’t use the usual French fried onions on top (they have gluten), but try Funyuns Onion Flavored Rings by Frito Lay. Yes, Funyuns, that very same snack you probably skip over in the chip aisle is gluten free and makes a great, crunchy topping. Read More »

Give thanks for a gluten free Thanksgiving, Part 1

Deitemeyer_Trish_Philadelphia_PA

Thanksgiving is a time of gratitude, togetherness, feasting and gluten. Yes, unfortunately, gluten is abundant on most holiday tables, in stuffings, gravies, pies, rolls and more. But it doesn’t have to be that way. In the next few articles, I’ll offer some good alternatives to your gluten-filled Turkey Day favorites. Read More »

Try these delicious gluten-free side dishes for your Thanksgiving feast

Hecht_Allison_LA_CA

Thanksgiving is inching closer, and soon tables will be covered with turkey and all the fixings.Below are a few great gluten-free side dish recipes from Whole Foods that are sure to complement your Thanksgiving feast.

butternut_with_spinachThe best part about these recipes? They are just seven ingredients or less, so you don’t have to worry about bringing a complicated dish to your dinner. So put your chef’s hat on and enjoy these tasty side dishes. Read More »

Wild rice and chestnut dressing for a gluten-free holiday

This delicious dish has a number of steps, but it is not difficult, and the results are well worth the effort!

6 cups water

1 1/2 cups wild rice

1/2 cup unsalted butter

4 cups finely chopped onion

2 cups finely chopped fennel

1 tablespoon poultry seasoning

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds

1 1/2 pounds good quality gluten-free bread, crusts removed and cubed Read More »

Three foods that should be part of any gluten free diet

Swan_Cindy_Billings_MT

oliveoilDue to the malabsorption concerns all too commonly associated with Celiac disease and gluten intolerance, nutrient rich whole foods are a vital to the diet. In the early stages of a gluten free diet, the body is still healing, or there are other underlying autoimmune illnesses, so there may be some foods that initially are not tolerated well. Introduce those foods slowly. Start by including the following three foods, which are loaded with vital nutrients, are naturally gluten free, and can be used in endless recipe variations: Read More »

Recall for undeclared wheat – Snacks on Racks, Inc

Bouldin_Kimberly_Columbus_OH

There has been a recall for undeclared wheat, among other allergens, in products made by Snacks on Racks, Inc of Parkville, Missouri. The Snack Packs are not sold to convenient stores, gas stations, grocery or mass market retailers. They are distributed through food service establishments at hospitals, colleges, universities and corporate cafeterias and kiosks. The complete list of products included in the recall can be viewed on the FDA’s website. Read More »

How Blood Tests for Gluten Sensitivity & Celiac Disease Actually Work

This article focuses on the two main antibody blood tests for celiac disease. It will tell you what each test looks for and what the results mean.

The two blood tests recommended when testing for celiac disease are the AGA-IgA test for gliadin (wheat proteins) as well as the tTG-IgA test for tissue transglutaminase.

Recent research indicates the blood tests most doctors are using, tTG & EMA, are not as reliable as first thought. Young children, elderly, smokers, the very ill and the not very ill can be missed. EMA, or endomysial antibodies has fallen out of favor so they will not be discussed.

Preparation for Testing

Make sure when being tested that you are on a gluten-containing diet, because the antibodies the tests look for would disappear if you are were gluten-free. Once you go gluten-free, future testing is unreliable.

AGA – The Test for Gluten Sensitivity

The AGA-IgA has fallen out of favor for CELIAC DISEASE, but it tests whether an immune reaction against GLUTEN (gliadin) is present in the system – it detects a GLUTEN SENSITIVITY reaction. You can have gluten sensitivity without developing the lesion that is characteristic of celiac disease. That is, you can have gluten sensitivity without celiac disease.

tTG – The Test for Celiac Disease

tTG tests for tissue transglutaminase antibodies, or antibodies against your own tissues. The tTG blood test does NOT tell you if you have celiac disease per se. It tells you the likelihood that villous atrophy will be discovered if an endoscopy with biopsy is performed. The higher the number, the more likely you have enough damage that one of the samples would show villous atrophy.

One thing to consider is that you have over 20 feet of small intestine. Biopsy samples are tiny and only about 5 are taken. How much damage is required before a positive biopsy sample is found?

Also, you can also have the beginning stages of celiac disease and the test results will be “negative” now, but if you were tested at a later date they could rise, making you positive. That is, the levels of antibodies now may not indicate probable intestinal damage enough to be found on endoscopy with biopsy. But they can rise over time – one month, six months, a year.

In one study we reviewed while creating the medical manual, Recognizing Celiac Disease, of the children who tested positive in the study, 40% had tested negative 5 years previously.

No test is 100% accurate. Determining celiac disease is still a judgment call. Even if the tests come back negative, try a strict 100% gluten free diet to see if symptoms improve. If they do, ask your doctor to take multiple vitamin and mineral levels to determine whether deficiencies exist.

Page 30 in Recognizing Celiac Disease lists the vitamins and minerals the NIH recommends checking: vitamins A, D, E, K, B12, folic acid and minerals calcium, iron, phosphorous.

The symptom charts in the book list which deficiencies cause which symptoms so you can determine which nutrient levels to test and give your doctor reasons to test for them. (Doctors will not take nutrient levels unless there is a reason to take them.) Correct the nutrient deficiencies and you will correct the symptoms in many cases.

A diagnosis is just a diagnosis. Good health is the most important thing.

For more information on the tests click here.

For more information on Recognizing Celiac Disease click here.

——————–
Author Information: John Libonati, Philadelphia, PA
President-elect, Celiac Sprue Association (CSA).
Publisher, Glutenfreeworks.com.
Editor & Publisher, Recognizing Celiac Disease.
John can be reached at john.libonati@glutenfreeworks.com.

>