John Libonati

Festive Gluten-Free Almond Fruitcake

December 2nd, 2008 by John Libonati


Foolproof Christmas option for gluten-intolerant (+ recipe)

Home » Lifestyle » Food & Wine Wed, 3 Dec 2008 Food & Wine

A festive almond fruitcake with a difference. This festive almond fruitcake is a superb alternative for those who are wheat- or gluten-intolerant or who would simply like to try a different Christmas cake. The dried fruit and almonds, both chopped and ground, are glued together with a minimum of batter.

It is an easy and foolproof cake to make.

Rich, moist and delicious, it is best served in small slices.

Use a small serrated knife to cut.

The cake will keep for up to three months if wrapped in foil and stored in the refrigerator.

It's great to have on hand right through the holidays.

For those with a mild glucose intolerance, a half tsp of baking powder is unlikely to be a problem.

When I checked the supermarket shelves to see what baking powders are available, I discovered that Edmonds is now gluten-free.

You can, if you wish, substitute a half tsp cream of tartar and a quarter tsp baking soda for the baking powder in this recipe to make a gluten-free raising agent, or just buy a gluten-free baking powder.

1kg mixed dried fruit 120g whole brown skinned almonds, roughly chopped 70g maize cornflour 1/2 tsp baking powder 70g ground almonds 3 eggs, size 6 1/4 cup honey, warmed 1 tsp natural almond essence 2 Tbsp amaretto liqueur or brandy (optional)

Line the base and sides of a 20cm square cake tin.

Combine dried fruits and chopped nuts in a large bowl and mix thoroughly.

Sift the cornflour and baking powder together and stir in the ground almonds.

Mix well.

Beat eggs and honey in a medium-sized bowl with an electric mixer until thick and creamy.

Beat in almond essence.

Stir the cornflour and almond mixture into the beaten eggs, mixing well.

Pour this into the bowl containing the dried fruit and nuts and stir until thoroughly combined.

Spread into the prepared tin, pushing it well into the corners.

Smooth the top.

Place just below the centre of an oven which has been heated to 150degC.

Cook for 1hr 35min to 1hr 50min.

The cake should be golden brown, feel firm to touch and a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake should come out clean.

Remove from the oven and brush the hot cake with amaretto, brandy or a liqueur of your choice.

Cool completely, wrap in foil and store in the refrigerator.

It is ready for eating within 12 hours of baking.

This is not a cake for icing.

I serve it just as it is, but you could brush the top with an apricot jam glaze and decorate with glace fruits.

- Joan Bishop

Article Source: http://www.odt.co.nz:80/lifestyle/food-wine/34329/foolproof-christmas-option-gluten-intolerant-recipe


 

PRESS RELEASE
Milestone Marks the First Time a European Patient with Active Celiac Disease has Enrolled in a Clinical Trial for an Investigational Medication from Alba Therapeutics
Last update: 8:22 p.m. EST Nov. 11, 2008
BALTIMORE, Nov 11, 2008 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ --

Alba Therapeutics Corporation announced today that for the first time, a European patient with active celiac disease has been enrolled in its clinical trial to investigate a treatment for the disease. Alba has enrolled and randomized the newly diagnosed patient from Spain in an eight-week Phase IIb trial with oral larazotide acetate, a tight junction regulator, for the treatment of patients with active celiac disease (CD). The global multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study will evaluate the clinical and histological efficacy, safety and tolerability of larazotide acetate in 106 active CD subjects adhering to a gluten-free diet, while assessing improvement in the clinical signs and symptoms of celiac disease.

"These are decisive times for our desire to one day be able to offer our celiac patients a treatment that allows them to live more normal lives," said Dr. Gemma Castillejo, MD, a pediatric gastroenterologist and principal investigator in the study. Dr. Castillejo, a leading European celiac expert from the Sant Joan de Reus University Hospital in Reus, Spain added, "I believe this clinical trial has the potential to be a turning point in the search for treatments for celiac disease."
"This is a major milestone for the celiac community in Europe," stated Francisco Leon, MD, PhD, Vice President, Clinical Development and Medical Affairs of Alba. "This is Alba's sixth human trial with larazotide acetate, and we are excited to be advancing our investigational program for larazotide acetate in this important region of the world."
About Celiac Disease
Celiac disease is an inherited autoimmune disorder where gluten has been identified as the environmental trigger of the disease. Gluten is an ingested protein found in wheat, barley and rye. Gluten is broken down into gliadin which can pass through the intestinal epithelial barrier during times of increased intestinal permeability. The ingestion of gluten causes an immune response which triggers an inflammatory reaction in the small intestine. This then causes damage to the villi in the small intestine and can lead to total villous atrophy in celiac disease. This results in varying symptoms such as fatigue, skin rash, anemia, fertility issues, joint pain, weight loss, pale sores inside the mouth, tooth discoloration or loss of enamel, depression, chronic diarrhea or constipation, gas and abdominal pain. The immunology and nutritional abnormalities in celiac disease can potentially result in long- term complications such as osteoporosis, refractory sprue, small intestinal cancer, and lymphoma.
Celiac disease is a growing public health concern, affecting approximately 3 million people in the United States and over 6.5 million people worldwide. The only current management of celiac disease is complete elimination of gluten from the diet, which can be very difficult to implement in practice. Additionally, the response to the gluten-free diet is poor in up to 30% of patients, and dietary nonadherence is the chief cause of persistent or recurrent symptoms.(1)
(1) Green, P, and Cellier, C, Review Article,
 Medical Progress, Celiac Disease, N ENGL J MED
 2007;357:1731-43
About "Larazotide Acetate"
Larazotide acetate is an experimental medicine and a tight junction regulator that acts locally by inhibiting the opening of tight junctions in epithelial cells lining the small intestine. In celiac disease, gluten crosses the epithelial barrier and stimulates the immune system, leading to cytokine release, gut inflammation, and opening of tight junctions. This leads to increased paracellular permeability, increased entry of gluten and the establishment of an intestinal permeability-inflammation loop. Larazotide acetate inhibits tight junction opening triggered by both gluten and inflammatory cytokines, thus reducing uptake of gluten. Larazotide acetate disrupts the intestinal permeability-inflammation loop, and reduces symptoms associated with celiac disease. Larazotide acetate is orally formulated, has been granted "Fast Track" designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of celiac disease, and is also being evaluated for the treatment of Crohn's Disease.

For more information about Alba's clinical trials, please visit the www.clinicaltrials.gov web site and search for Alba Therapeutics.

About Alba
Alba Therapeutics Corporation is a privately held, clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development, and commercialization of therapies to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and is located in Baltimore, Maryland. Alba's technology platform is based upon a key pathway that regulates the assembly and disassembly of tight junctions in cell barriers throughout the body. As a result of its unique technology platform, Alba is a leader in mucosal biology and has developed a pipeline of innovative therapeutic candidates that has the potential to modify the course of disease and significantly improve upon existing treatments for a wide range of diseases such as celiac disease, Crohn's disease, and Asthma/COPD or acute lung injury.
    Media: Mariesa Kemble
    Sam Brown Communications
    608-850-4745
    kemblem@aol.com 

    Corporate: Wendy Perrow, MBA
    Alba Therapeutics Corporation
    410-878-9850
    info@albatherapeutics.com
    http://www.albatherapeutics.com
----------------------
Author Information: John Libonati, Philadelphia, PA
Publisher, Glutenfreeworks.com.
Editor & Publisher, Recognizing Celiac Disease.
John can be reached by e-mail here.

By John Libonati

Commonly asked questions on nutrition and Celiac Disease, answered by Melinda Dennis, MS, RD, of the Celiac Disease Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Ms. Dennis has herself had Celiac Disease for more than 17 years.

Q. What is it like for a person you see who is newly diagnosed with Celiac Disease? A. The gluten-free diet requires more preparation, taking food with you when you travel, making sure that you are safe in dining-out situations or when you are visiting with family or friends. So for some, it is very simple and straight forward and they are already experimenting with new grains like amaranth, buckwheat, millet, sorghum, and teff. But some people are completely unfamiliar with these grains and it is a bit more of a stretch for them. Many people just eat on the run these days and this really makes it challenging. Others are in complete denial. Perhaps they were having no symptoms but this was discovered through a blood test and they think – do I really need to change my life? Those are the people who, understandably, ask “how much can I get away with?” So there are all different types of people. But more and more people are coming into the clinic well educated about this because of the good information on the web. That’s a big change from about seven or so years ago when there were very few resources.  

Q. There are many gluten-free foods on the market now. Does this make it easier for those diagnosed with Celiac Disease? A. Yes. But it’s important to stress that the gluten-free diet isn’t just about what we need to take out of our meals, it’s about making sure the foods you do choose have lots of nutrients. Rice, corn and potatoes have a really high glycemic index, and they don’t have a lot of fiber. They can create food cravings. They can lead to weight gain and they are not nutritionally dense. So when we think of Celiac Disease, we think – how can we make up for the fact that we don’t have a very high protein wheat product any longer? What can we substitute and what would be superior? That’s when we work on educating about other grains that are healthier and have plenty of vitamins and minerals. Several of the gluten-free foods are now fortified with B vitamins, iron and trace minerals, and you can check the labels to make sure.  

Q. It’s great there are more gluten-free options, but even reading the labels don’t always help. What items have hidden gluten? A. Lots of things you wouldn’t expect contain gluten. Toothpaste can have gluten; you have to be careful to wash your hands carefully after feeding your dog because chow usually contains gluten. Dental pumice that is used to polish your teeth may contain gluten. Soy sauce, gravies and marinades are suspect. Even communion wafers. Patients need to be educated on all of this, because consistent exposure to gluten will lead to increased damage to the small intestine.  

Q. Do most patients eventually adopt a healthy, gluten-free diet? A. Most patients, even those who have a hard time with the diagnosis, do learn how to eat well. From my own experience, I feel it was actually a blessing to be diagnosed. It changed my life for the better. It empowered me to make the right decisions, to eat well—actually better than I had ever eaten before. I travel more now and experiment with tasty foods, more ethnic food, as well. So it’s a good thing to have a diagnosis—and learn the best ways to take care of your body and be healthy. Above content provided by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. For advice about your medical care, consult your doctor. Source: http://www.thebostonchannel.com:80/bethisrael-old/17014446/detail.html

------------------------ """Author Information: John Libonati, Philadelphia, PA Publisher, Glutenfreeworks.com. Editor & Publisher, Recognizing Celiac Disease. John can be reached by e-mail here."""

Reporting Amelia Santaniello MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) ― Like most young boys, Will Johnson is all about dinosaurs, not necessarily dairy. In fact, he's allergic to milk and eats gluten- and dairy-free.

But the lack of dairy in his diet might actually be helping him grow in new ways. He is on what has become known as the autism diet, which he said does everything.

"He was diagnosed with high-functioning autism about a little over a year ago," said Will's mother Janette Johnson. She added he was very hyper and energetic at the time.

Swings and ball pits weren't enough to get the meltdowns and sensory needs associated with Will's autism under control.

"Even a few months ago, he wouldn't be able to be around here at all," Janette Johnson said.

She decided to start her son on a gluten-free, casein-free diet after hearing from other parents it could work miracles. But, to fully understand the science behind the diet, it's important to note what gluten and casein actually are.

Gluten is a protein found in foods like wheat, rye, oats and barley. It helps hold things like breads together and makes them soft. Casein is a protein found in dairy products, and one of the things that makes cheese melt.

Some doctors say these two proteins act like the drug opium in children with autism, impairing both the immune system and the brain.

"We're not 100 percent sure, but what's happening is that the body may not be completely breaking down those proteins," said Dr. Paul Nash, a nutritional wellness practitioner.

Nash, who is what's known as a "DAN" (defeat autism now) doctor, said the partially digested proteins are getting absorbed, which can have effects. DAN doctors believe gluten and casein can change how some kids on the autism spectrum think and act.

"They've done studies where they've injected lab animals with these compounds and they've seen behaviors similar to autism and schizophrenia," Nash said.

On the contrary, medical doctors have been slow to embrace the idea that the diet could change a child's behavior.

"I think a lot of it is just the history of what autism used to be thought of, as a behavior disorder and that there was no medical link," said Dr. Bryan Jepson, a biomedical expert on autism who is considered an expert in the biomedical field and practices at an autism-focused clinic called the Thoughtful House Center for Children in Texas.

Jepson is one doctor who said the diet does work, but that those in his profession are often skeptical. He said with some children, you can see an immediate response, but it will often take about a month or sometimes even a few months.

"I think a lot of the argument from the doctors would say well, it's expensive, it's hard, you're wasting money, it's a false hope," he said.

At the same time, Jepson said that, in reality, 60 to 70 percent of his patients who have tried it have in fact had a response.

Janette Johnson is cognizant of the controversy. When reporter Amelia Santaniello asked her what the traditional allergist said, she said he told her she was wasting her time, money, and socially impairing her child further than he was.

But like so many parents with kids on the spectrum, she was willing to try anything to help her son.

"His behavior has changed quite a bit," she said.

She said some parents say it is drastic, like if a child starts talking, but she thinks for Will it's more subtle. He now has better eye contact and talks to more people. During their interview, he told Santaniello he likes the food his mother makes for him.

"It's a lot of work on the parent to make sure that the child is getting what he needs," Johnson said.

At the same time, shopping, label reading and learning to cook a whole new way are getting easier. Penni Ruben, director of store operations at Lakewinds Natural Foods, said they do what their customers ask for. At Lakewinds, every item in the store is coded with colored dots.

"The green is wheat-free, the red is gluten-free, the yellow is yeast-free and the blue is dairy-free," Ruben said.

The store also hosts cooking classes for parents who are just starting out, taught by those who have experienced the same thing.

Cooking instructor Angela Litzinger, whose daughter is gluten-intolerant, said she does it because she doesn't want anybody to start from scratch.

"I think everybody deserves a cookie," she said.

Litzinger added that sometimes it is hard being a mother, and that having a kid with special needs can sometimes puts an extra layer of pressure on your time.

"I don't want anybody to start from scratch like I had to," she said.

Janette Johnson said the classes are a huge help and she is now experimenting with everything from brownies to rolls. She admits the diet is a lot of work and very expensive, upwards of $100 or more per month, but she doesn't think of it as a diet. She thinks of it as another therapy -- a food therapy.

"It's something that he needs to help his body so he can think and he can be better," she said.

Source: http://wcco.com:80/health/autism.diet.nutrition.2.779448.html

John Libonati

Gluten Free Heinz Product List

July 23rd, 2008 by John Libonati

This list of gluten-free products manufactured by Heinz just in from the Knoxville Celiac Listserve.To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit http://celi-act.com/mailman/listinfo/knoxceliacs_celi-act.com or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to knoxceliacs-request@celi-act.comThank you for your interest in Heinz Products. We certainly understand how difficult it can be to find foods that meet the requirements of a restricted diet.    As you requested, the following is a listing of all of our products that do  NOT have gluten containing ingredients. If the product you asked about is not  on this list, then it may contain  gluten containing ingredients.   HEINZ PRODUCTS:   Heinz BBQ Sauces  (Original, Chicken & Rib, Garlic, Honey Garlic Only) > Heinz Chili Sauce > Heinz Cocktail Sauce > Heinz Horseradish Sauce > Heinz Ketchup    > Heinz Organic Ketchup > Heinz One-Carb Ketchup > Heinz No-Sodium Added Ketchup > Heinz Hot and Spicy Kick'rs > Heinz Easy Squeeze Ketchup > Heinz  Mustard   (All Varieties) > Heinz Pickles  (All Varieties) > Heinz  Peppers  (All Varieties) > Heinz Relish  (All Varieties) > Heinz Sloppy Joe Sauce > Heinz Traditional Steak Sauce > Heinz Vegetarian Beans > Heinz Distilled White Vinegar > Heinz Red Wine Vinegar > Heinz Apple Cider Vinegar > Heinz Apple Cider Flavored Vinegar > Heinz Red Wine Vinegar > Heinz Garlic Wine Vinegar > Jack Daniel's BBQ Sauces  (Original #7, Honey Smokehouse, Hickory Brown Sugar, > Spicy BBQ Only)  > Jack Daniel's EZ Marinader -- Teriyaki Variety > Jack Daniel's EZ Marinader -- Garlic & Herb Variety > Jack Daniel's Steak Sauce (Both Varieties) > Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce > Lea & Perrins Traditional Steak Sauce >            TGI Fridays Salsa  (All Varieties)                    CLASSICO PRODUCTS: > Classico Red Sauces  (All Varieties) > Classico Alfredo Sauces (All Varieties) > Classico Pesto Sauces  (All Varieties) > Classico Bruschetta (All Varieties) >         > DELIMEX PRODUCTS: > UPC CODE:       PRODUCT NAME: > 1769600012        Taquitos, 36 ct. Delimex Chicken > 1769600018        Tamales, 12 ct. Delimex Beef > 1769600019        Tamales, 12 ct. Delimex Chicken & Cheese > 1769600020        Taquitos, 24 ct. Smart & Final Beef > 1769600024        Tamales, 6 ct. Delimex Beef > 1769600028        Taquitos, 25 ct. Delimex Beef > 1769600029        Taquitos, 25 ct. Delimex Chicken > 1769600048        Taquitos, 36 ct. Delimex Beef > 1769600095        Taquitos, 12 ct. Delimex Beef > 1769600096        Taquitos, 12 ct. Delimex Chicken > 1769600133        Taquitos, 22 ct. Schwan's Beef w/ Salsa > 1769600155        Tamales, 15 ct. Costco Beef > 1769600159        Tamales, 20 ct. Delimex Beef, Costco > 1769600180        Taquitos, 60 ct. Delimex Beef > 1769600186        Taquitos, 60 ct. Sam's Club Beef > 1769600206        Tamales, 2 ct. Trader Joe's Beef > 1769600207        Tamales, 2 ct. Trader Joe's Chicken & Cheese > 1769600214        Taquitos, 25 ct. Delimex 3-Cheese > 1769600222        Tamales, 6 ct. Schwan's Beef > 1769600481        Taquitos, 36 ct. Delimex Beef (Mexico Import) > 1769600500        Taquitos, Delimex Beef / Deli-Pak > 1769600505        Taquitos, Mini, 40 ct. Beef, Snacker Tray w/ salsa > 1769600554        Tamales, Cheese Deli Bulk Pack > 1769600555        Tamales, Chicken Deli Bulk Pack > 1769600556        Tamales, Beef Deli Bulk Pack > 1769600565        Tamales, 20 ct.Beef, Sams Club > 1769600684        Taquitos, 66 ct. Costco Beef > 1769600685        Taquitos, 66 ct. Costco Chicken  

> 1769601208        Tamales, 2 ct. Trader Joe's Cheese & Green Chiles           ORE-IDA PRODUCTS:  UPC CODE:           PRODUCT NAME: > 13120XXXXX-        ALL VARIETIES of Ore-Ida? Tater Tots?  >1312000080         Ore-Ida Golden Patties? (9 ct.) > 1312000198         Ore-Ida? Snackin' Fries ? (10.5 oz.) > 1312000258         Ore-Ida? Golden Fries? (32 oz.) > 1312000278         Ore-Ida? Golden Fries?  (5 lb.) > 1312000286         Ore-Ida? Golden Crinkles? (32 oz.) > 1312000291         Ore-Ida? Golden Crinkles? (5 lb.) > 1312000296         Ore-Ida? Pixie Crinkles (26 oz.) > 1312000377         Ore-Ida? Cottage Fries (32 oz.) > 1312000392         Ore-Ida? Southern Style Hash Browns (32 oz.) > 1312001417         Ore-Ida Extra Crispy Fast Food Fries (26 oz.) > 1312000469         Ore-Ida? Potatoes O'Brien (28 oz.) > 1312000647         Ore-Ida? French Fries (8 lb.) > 1312000654         Ore-Ida? Country Style Hashbrowns (6 lb.) > 1312000801         Ore-Ida? Shoestrings? (5 lb) > 1312000809         Ore-Ida? Crunch Time Classics Straight Cut (24 oz.) > 1312000810         Ore-Ida? Crunch Time Classics Crinkle Cut (24 oz.) > 1312000828         Ore-Ida? Shoestrings? (28 oz.) > 1312000829         Ore-Ida? Shoestrings? (40 oz.) > 1312000833         Ore-Ida? Country Style Hashbrowns (30 oz.) > 1312000845         Ore-Ida? Deep Fries Crinkle Cuts (24 oz.) > 1312000854         Ore-Ida? Hash Browns (5 lb.) > 1312000862         Ore-Ida? Country Style Hashbrowns (6 lb.) > 1312001012         Ore-Ida? Potato Wedges with Skins (24 oz.) > 1312001190         Ore-Ida? Steak Fries (3.75 lb.) > 1312008564         Ore-Ida? Golden Crinkles?  (8 lb.) > 1312008565         Ore-Ida? Golden Fries?  (8 lb.) > 1312008572         Ore-Ida? Golden Crinkles? (8 lb.)                   Again, we appreciate you taking the time to contact us.   If you need further  information, feel free to call us at this toll-free number (1-800-255-5750).  Our offices are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 AM until 6:00 PM, Eastern  Time.   Heinz Consumer Resource Center  Heinzconsumeraffairs@us.hjheinz.com   When contacting us, please refer to the following reference number: 002865985A   HEINZ/JNEEL   P.S. - For your convenience, here's a recipe for a barbecue sauce without  gluten-containing ingredients:   Heinz Ketchup Basic Barbecue Sauce   1/2 cup Heinz Tomato Ketchup  1/4 cup water  2 tablespoons brown sugar  2 tablespoons Heinz Apple Cider Vinegar  2 tablespoons Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce  1 teaspoon chili powder  1/2 teaspoon celery seed  1/2 teaspoon salt  1/4 teaspoon hot pepper sauce   In saucepan, combine all ingredients.  Simmer, uncovered, 10 minutes.  Brush ribs or chicken with sauce during last 10 minutes of grilling or  broiling.     Makes about 3/4 cup of sauce.  

The Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University is sending a free copy of their newly revised Ultimate Guide to Gluten-Free Living to everyone on their contact list as of July 30, 2008.  To receive a copy, please email your complete contact information (name, address, phone, fax, email) to cb2280@columbia.edu.  The guide will be mailed after July 30, 2008.

The Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University was established within the Department of Medicine at Columbia University in 2001.  Its mission: to redefine the future of celiac disease and treatment on an ongoing basis, through continuing advances in research, patient care, and physician and public education.

Under the guidance of Peter Green, MD, one of a few recognized experts on celiac disease in the United States, the Center has become world-renowned for its services and programs and is one of the first medical school based centers in the United States dedicated to the treatment and study of celiac disease. The Center is diagnosing and treating more than 2600 patients annually from around the world.  Additional information is available online at www.celiacdiseasecenter.org.

Tell Cynthia Gluten Free Works sent you!  :)

-John

John Libonati, Editor john.libonati@glutenfreeworks.com

John Libonati

Dentists Can Help to Recognize Celiac Disease

July 21st, 2008 by John Libonati

gluten free dentist
Photo © ADAM

Dentistry Blog

By Tammy Davenport, About.com Guide to Dentistry since 2005

Celiac disease causes the body's immune system to damage and attack the small intestine upon consumption of proteins in barley, rye, wheat and possibly oats. Since there are no specific blood tests to determine if someone has Celiac disease, doctors use blood tests to look for certain autoantibodies and biopsy the small intestine to look for traits of Celiac disease.Nancy Lapid, our Guide to Celiac Disease, points out that certain dental conditions are more common in people with this disease, which puts dentists in a good position to help notice when a patient might have Celiac disease.

Some examples of dental related problems in a patient with Celiac disease are tooth enamel defects, canker sores and delayed eruption in the teeth.

Source: http://dentistry.about.com/b/2008/05/14/dentists-can-help-to-recognize-celiac-disease.htm

John Libonati

Ghirardelli Chocolate Bars & Squares Not Gluten Free

July 19th, 2008 by John Libonati

Ghirardelli Chocolate bars and squares are NOT gluten-free.

From GlutenFree Indy, excerpt from a post on a well known chocolate bar:

Thank you for your email regarding Ghirardelli Chocolate.  The 60%Bittersweet Chocolate Chips are manufactured on a line free of gluten.   In June 2008, the Ghirardelli Chocolate Company  introduced new milk chocolate bar which has a barley gluten as an ingredient.  As a result,the line which produces our chocolate bars and squares will no longer be safe for consumers with gluten allergens. Kind regards, Shawna OrtezSenior Consumer Affairs Coordinator Ghirardelli Chocolate Company1111 - 139th AvenueSan Leandro, CA  94578

Ever wonder what "active ingredients" are and why "inert ingredients" (a hiding place for gluten) are added to vitamins, minerals, herbals or other supplements? Thanks to Nature's Made, you can find out.  Visit http://www.naturemade.com/ProductDatabase/prd_label.asp?tab=Products to access their quick and easy primer on reading label information.   Fast track learn to safely and accurately obtain the % daily you need and other important information like what I.U., mg, and mcg measurements mean.  While you’re there, click on “A consumers guide to smart vitamin use.”

The news release below is timely because anti-gliadin antibody blood tests are losing ground while the reality of gluten sensitivity looms far larger than is now appreciated by many doctors!  These blood tests are absolutely necessary to investigate health problems caused by gluten itself, yet they are being dismissed by doctors who look only to diagnosing celiac disease.

Positive anti-gliadin antibody tests show undigested gluten peptides in the bloodstream.  This abnormal finding tells the story that gluten has passed through the tight barrier defenses of the small intestinal lining into the body where it can wreak havoc, with or without celiac disease.  Gluten is a food protein in wheat, barley, rye and oats.

In screening for celiac disease, an inherited immune response to gluten entering the small intestinal lining, doctors rely on the celiac specific antibody tests, anti-endomysium and anti-tissue transglutaminase.  However, the investigation to find these auto-antibodies must not exclude the anti-gliadin antibodies. 

Doctors Slow To Recognise Gluten Harm.” Dr. Rodney Ford, Leading New Zealand Paediatrician And Allergist Challenges Medical Stalwarts With Revolutionary Gluten Thinking

There is more to gluten problems than just coeliac disease. Gluten sensitivity is ten times more prevalent than celiac disease in New Zealand and mostly undiagnosed. This is the message that Christchurch-based paediatrician, allergist and author, Doctor Rodney Ford wants to get across to the public and the ever conservative medical fraternity.

The practice of medicine is restricted to the knowledge, experience, attitudes and politics of the society it functions in. Medicine is an inexact but evolving science, thus current standard medical practices are often disproved. The validity of medical opinion, long held to be the gold standard of diagnosis and treatment, are constantly challenged. This is a healthy dynamic, one that enables the pursuit of excellence and the evolution of better forms of practice, resulting in better outcomes for patients. Why, then asks Dr Ford, is there such resistance to his new Gluten Syndrome hypothesis recently published in a book and supported by years of clinical experience and research.

In the absence of coeliac disease, his latest research shows that the simple gluten test (IgG-gliadin antibody) is a sensitive indicator to detect those people who get sick eating gluten but who have tested negative to Celiac Disease. However, this test is rarely ordered by general practitioners or specialists. He says “This is because of an illogical rejection of gluten sensitivity as a valid diagnosis. Ignoring gluten flies in the face of all of the evidence and is also alienating doctors from their patients.”

Picture this, if you will: a six year old girl, Elizabeth, small for her age, a distended stomach, gas and suffering from gastric reflux. Her teachers reported a lack of attention at school and early learning problems. Elizabeth had been thoroughly investigated by the medical profession: blood tests, bowel biopsies, colonoscopy, endoscopy. Celiac Disease had been ruled out, various medications had been tried and doctors had started to question her mother’s parenting skills. Elizabeth’s parents had gone beyond frustration and fear for their child, they were at the point of desperation.

This is a common story in Dr Ford’s practice. It is also one of the many success stories he has to share. After seeing Dr Ford, a positive IgG-gliadin antibody test and being put on a gluten free diet, Elizabeth improved within a few days. Within weeks she made a remarkable recovery and was in essence cured. Gluten was no longer a choice for her and accidental intake still causes her a reoccurrence of symptoms. Adhering to a gluten free diet has enabled Elizabeth to grow into the healthy, happy and successful young woman that she is today.

Common stories such as this, along with the increasing research and evidence of gluten based harm, should be enough to spur the medical profession into action in an effort to save the current generation of children from the long term health, social and financial consequences of what is an easily diagnosed and treatable condition.

The shocking truth is that this terrible scourge of gluten is being ignored by most medical practitioners. Even worse, the blood tests that can diagnose it are being abandoned by many medical laboratories. For instance, Medlab Diagnostics in Auckland no longer offers gliadin antibody tests.

The medical professions reluctance to act on the gluten problem is costing New Zealand billions of dollars each year with long term and far reaching consequences. From a dollars and cents point of view it makes no economic sense. From a patient care point of view it is bordering on negligence.

Source: Scoop Independent News, New Zealand, Thursday, 19 June 2008, 9:49 am You can find this news release at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/GE0806/S00059.htm