John Libonati

Ghirardelli Chocolate Bars & Squares Not Gluten Free

July 19th, 2008 by John Libonati


Ghirardelli Chocolate bars and squares are NOT gluten-free.

From GlutenFree Indy, excerpt from a post on a well known chocolate bar:

Thank you for your email regarding Ghirardelli Chocolate.  The 60%Bittersweet Chocolate Chips are manufactured on a line free of gluten.   In June 2008, the Ghirardelli Chocolate Company  introduced new milk chocolate bar which has a barley gluten as an ingredient.  As a result,the line which produces our chocolate bars and squares will no longer be safe for consumers with gluten allergens. Kind regards, Shawna OrtezSenior Consumer Affairs Coordinator Ghirardelli Chocolate Company1111 - 139th AvenueSan Leandro, CA  94578


Ever wonder what "active ingredients" are and why "inert ingredients" (a hiding place for gluten) are added to vitamins, minerals, herbals or other supplements? Thanks to Nature's Made, you can find out.  Visit http://www.naturemade.com/ProductDatabase/prd_label.asp?tab=Products to access their quick and easy primer on reading label information.   Fast track learn to safely and accurately obtain the % daily you need and other important information like what I.U., mg, and mcg measurements mean.  While you’re there, click on “A consumers guide to smart vitamin use.”

The news release below is timely because anti-gliadin antibody blood tests are losing ground while the reality of gluten sensitivity looms far larger than is now appreciated by many doctors!  These blood tests are absolutely necessary to investigate health problems caused by gluten itself, yet they are being dismissed by doctors who look only to diagnosing celiac disease.

Positive anti-gliadin antibody tests show undigested gluten peptides in the bloodstream.  This abnormal finding tells the story that gluten has passed through the tight barrier defenses of the small intestinal lining into the body where it can wreak havoc, with or without celiac disease.  Gluten is a food protein in wheat, barley, rye and oats.

In screening for celiac disease, an inherited immune response to gluten entering the small intestinal lining, doctors rely on the celiac specific antibody tests, anti-endomysium and anti-tissue transglutaminase.  However, the investigation to find these auto-antibodies must not exclude the anti-gliadin antibodies. 

Doctors Slow To Recognise Gluten Harm.” Dr. Rodney Ford, Leading New Zealand Paediatrician And Allergist Challenges Medical Stalwarts With Revolutionary Gluten Thinking

There is more to gluten problems than just coeliac disease. Gluten sensitivity is ten times more prevalent than celiac disease in New Zealand and mostly undiagnosed. This is the message that Christchurch-based paediatrician, allergist and author, Doctor Rodney Ford wants to get across to the public and the ever conservative medical fraternity.

The practice of medicine is restricted to the knowledge, experience, attitudes and politics of the society it functions in. Medicine is an inexact but evolving science, thus current standard medical practices are often disproved. The validity of medical opinion, long held to be the gold standard of diagnosis and treatment, are constantly challenged. This is a healthy dynamic, one that enables the pursuit of excellence and the evolution of better forms of practice, resulting in better outcomes for patients. Why, then asks Dr Ford, is there such resistance to his new Gluten Syndrome hypothesis recently published in a book and supported by years of clinical experience and research.

In the absence of coeliac disease, his latest research shows that the simple gluten test (IgG-gliadin antibody) is a sensitive indicator to detect those people who get sick eating gluten but who have tested negative to Celiac Disease. However, this test is rarely ordered by general practitioners or specialists. He says “This is because of an illogical rejection of gluten sensitivity as a valid diagnosis. Ignoring gluten flies in the face of all of the evidence and is also alienating doctors from their patients.”

Picture this, if you will: a six year old girl, Elizabeth, small for her age, a distended stomach, gas and suffering from gastric reflux. Her teachers reported a lack of attention at school and early learning problems. Elizabeth had been thoroughly investigated by the medical profession: blood tests, bowel biopsies, colonoscopy, endoscopy. Celiac Disease had been ruled out, various medications had been tried and doctors had started to question her mother’s parenting skills. Elizabeth’s parents had gone beyond frustration and fear for their child, they were at the point of desperation.

This is a common story in Dr Ford’s practice. It is also one of the many success stories he has to share. After seeing Dr Ford, a positive IgG-gliadin antibody test and being put on a gluten free diet, Elizabeth improved within a few days. Within weeks she made a remarkable recovery and was in essence cured. Gluten was no longer a choice for her and accidental intake still causes her a reoccurrence of symptoms. Adhering to a gluten free diet has enabled Elizabeth to grow into the healthy, happy and successful young woman that she is today.

Common stories such as this, along with the increasing research and evidence of gluten based harm, should be enough to spur the medical profession into action in an effort to save the current generation of children from the long term health, social and financial consequences of what is an easily diagnosed and treatable condition.

The shocking truth is that this terrible scourge of gluten is being ignored by most medical practitioners. Even worse, the blood tests that can diagnose it are being abandoned by many medical laboratories. For instance, Medlab Diagnostics in Auckland no longer offers gliadin antibody tests.

The medical professions reluctance to act on the gluten problem is costing New Zealand billions of dollars each year with long term and far reaching consequences. From a dollars and cents point of view it makes no economic sense. From a patient care point of view it is bordering on negligence.

Source: Scoop Independent News, New Zealand, Thursday, 19 June 2008, 9:49 am You can find this news release at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/GE0806/S00059.htm

Special diets for special kids: Autism and casein- & gluten-free diets

Can food affect your kid's autism?

"Leaky gut"

One of the reasons the GFCF diet is often recommended for autistic individuals is due to a medical condition known as “leaky gut,” in which the intestinal lining is more permeable than normal. A leaky gut does not properly absorb nutrients, and as a result can lead to symptoms of bloating, gas, cramps, fatigue, headaches, memory loss, poor concentration of irritability. Healing of the gut is being seen in individuals who have gluten and casein eliminated from their diets.

In a study written by Stephen M Edelson, PhD, at the Center for the Study of Autism in Salem, Oregon, he says: “Some people suggest that the health status of the child’s intestinal tract should be examined first; and if there is evidence of a ‘leaky gut,’ then the child should be placed on a gluten- and/or casein-free diet. The intestinal permeability test is one way to determine whether a child has a ‘leaky gut.’ This test involves drinking a sweet-tasting solution and then collecting urine samples afterwards. Most physicians can administer this test. Parents have also sent their child’s urine samples to laboratories to test for the presence of abnormal peptides associated with gluten and casein in the urine. However, many people feel that these tests are not necessary and suggest that one should simply place the child on a restricted diet and then observe whether or not there are any improvements in the child.”

A GFCF success story

Miami mom Hilda Mitrani says she has seen significant improvement in her autistic son in the 10 years he has been on a gluten-free, casein-free diet. She initially found out about the diet through an email support group list of parents of children with autism. “On this list, Karyn Seroussi and Lisa Lewis, PhD, were commenting on children with autism whose behaviors had decreased after dietary changes,” says Mitrani. “Then I went to an autism conference and met Karyn and her husband, who was a scientist with Johnson & Johnson."

She says she quickly realized that her son fit the pattern of the children that were being helped by the GFCF diet. "He has frequent bouts of diarrhea, horrible gas attacks and allergic reactions that were visible on his skin," Mitrani says. "Also, I would describe his behavior as something like an addict’s. When he had his 'gluten fix,' he was pacified. Without it, his behavior was uncontrollable.”

After starting the diet, her son’s gastrointestinal system began to settle down with the diarrhea, gas attacks and allergic reactions disappearing, and his behavior stabilizing. The diet however, is hard to maintain, especially as a child may continue to seek gluten. “For more than a year, he sought out gluten in every place he went,” says Mitrani. “I would find him in a bathroom, covering himself with soap or gluten-based shampoos, or was told that he tried to eat paste at school. As he became older, I could speak with him rationally about not doing these things.”

In addition, Mitrani took special pains to make sure her son had a special treat at every birthday party and family event. “We made cakes, cookies, pizza and everything else that other people would be eating in a gluten-free version, so that he never felt left out.”

She offers the following advice to parents considering the GFCF diet for her or his child:

If you've heard how hard it is to maintain this kind of special diet, take heart in the fact that it's easier now than ever, with terrific gluten-free recipes and many types of flour with which to bake.

Try every recipe until you find ones that work for you.

Don’t forget to eliminate the gluten in over-the-counter products or pharmaceuticals as a potential contaminant.

For information on gluten intolerance -- and some tasty GF recipes -- check out these links:

  • 6 tips for gluten-free living
  • Gluten-free Raspberry Souffle
  • Gluten-free Banana Cake
  •    Source: You can find this article at http://www.sheknows.com/articles/804531.htm?page=2   About the author: Marla Hardee Milling is a freelance writer in Asheville, North Carolina. Her articles have appeared in a wide variety of publications, both online and in print, including Cooking Smart, Healthgate, Pinnacle Living, Blue Ridge Country, LowCarb Energy, Charleston Magazine, Smart Computing's PC Today, The Christian Science Monitor and several pregnancy and health/fitness publications, among others.  

    This article describes safety standards for internationally shipped baby food and includes benchmarks for producing gluten-free foods set by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO).

    Tue Jul 1, 2008 1:59pm BST  Email | Print | Share| Single Page| Recommend (0) [-] Text [+]   1 of 1Full SizeBy Laura MacInnis

    GENEVA (Reuters) - Diplomats in Geneva have agreed new limits for bacteria in baby formula and natural toxins in nuts, setting safety standards to apply for internationally shipped food, the World Health Organisation said on Tuesday.

    At a meeting of the Codex Alimentarius Commission, a joint body of the WHO and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), officials also set benchmarks for producing gluten-free foods.

    Peter Ben Embarek, a scientist in the WHO's food safety division, said the adoption of the "landmark" code of hygienic practices for powdered formula could reduce contamination from two bacteria that can cause severe illness and death in babies.

    People with wheat allergies would also be protected by the standards for gluten-free food that countries pledged to work into their national legislation, and to meet in food exports under World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules.

    "They have to use these standards as the baseline standards to be able to trade at the international level," Embarek told a news briefing on the second day of the week-long Codex meeting.

    The new benchmark dictates that food labeled gluten-free may not contain wheat, rye, barley or oats, and its gluten level may not exceed 20 milligrams per kilogram. Gluten intolerance can cause symptoms ranging from abdominal pain to osteoporosis.

    The 124 countries participating in this week's Codex meeting also agreed maximum levels for aflatoxins -- natural toxins that are known carcinogens in laboratory animals -- in almonds, hazelnuts and pistachios.

    FOOD CODE

    The Codex Alimentarius, or food code, is a global reference for consumers, food producers, food processors, national food control agencies and international food traders.

    Its standards -- meant to avert contamination, spoiling and ill-health -- are the benchmarks against which the WTO reviews countries' adherence to international trade agreements on food safety and sanitation.

    Other topics to be considered this week include flavorings, frozen foods, natural mineral water, tomatoes, bitter cassava, and bivalve mollusks such as mussels, oysters and clams.

    The Commission, whose full membership includes 176 countries plus the European Union, is also due to discuss the food safety impacts of veterinary drugs, animal feeds, and pesticides.

    Groups including the International Chewing Gum Association, the International Peanut Forum, the International Association of Fish Inspectors, the International Baby Food Action Network, the World Sugar Research Organisation and the World Self-Medication Industry have observer status at the meeting, which ends Friday.

    (Additional reporting by Stephanie Nebehay)

    http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSL0166682420080701?pageNumber=2&virtualBrandChannel=10216&sp=true

    John Libonati

    Bell and Evans Gluten Free Items – Chicken

    June 24th, 2008 by John Libonati

    Below is a list of gluten-free items from Bell & Evans.  You can also find hundreds of recipes that can be converted to gluten-free at their website:

    http://www.bellandevans.com/index.cfm?act=recipes

    Thank you for contacting Bell & Evans.  In addition to our line of breaded, gluten free items, the following are also gluten free: All fresh chicken

    Fully cooked wings  - Honey BBQ and Buffalo Style

    Fully cooked grilled breasts – Honey BBQ, Buffalo Style and Plain

    Chicken Burgers As we reprint packaging we are adding gluten free to all these packages. If I can be of any other assistance, please do not hesitate to contact me. Susan Ranck

    Quality Assurance Manager

    Bell & Evans Poultry

    (717)865-6626

    www.bellandevans.com

    Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

    Making the Connection – in Celiac Disease

    May 19th, 2008 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

    Advance For Nurses Magazine Vol. 9 •Issue 11 • Page 21

    Making the Connection Underdiagnosed in the U.S., celiac disease can be identified and treated if the condition is understood

    By Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

    Celiac disease is a common food sensitivity that can be the underlying source of hundreds of health problems mistakenly attributed to other causes. This insidious disorder has the potential to disfigure, disable and destroy lives at any age. Yet, of the 3 million affected Americans, only 3 percent are diagnosed and treated.1 Prevalence rates are higher in certain populations, such as blood relatives of a person with celiac disease and those with autoimmune disorders.

    Unfortunately, people in the U.S. with this condition actively seeking help for their symptoms can go a lifetime without diagnosis and proper treatment. Typically, worldwide diagnosis is faster. Genetic Susceptibility & Gluten

    Celiac disease is also called celiac sprue, nontropical sprue, gluten-sensitive enteropathy or simply celiac by the public.

    This immune-mediated disorder stems from an inherited lifelong intolerance to the gluten protein found in wheat, barley, rye and oats. When ingested, gluten resists the breakdown action of normal digestive enzymes into harmless amino acids. Undigested peptides precipitate hyperpermeability of the small intestinal lining (so-called "leaky gut") to breach the intestinal barrier defense system. In this way, gluten unnaturally gains entrance to the lamina propria.

    Within the lamina propria, gluten peptides encounter the enzyme transglutaminase and the local immune system. Transglutaminase deamidates, or breaks off, the rich glutamine residues in gluten. This deamidation creates the toxic molecular compounds, or epitopes, the immune system identifies as foreign.

    These epitopes trigger autoimmune antibodies in genetically susceptible individuals. Ensuing inflammation swells affected portions of the small intestinal lining and damages its delicate structures, interfering with its function to finish digestion and absorb nutrients.

    While gluten itself is the environmental cause for antibody development, some stressors that can trigger active disease include gluten overload, pregnancy, viral gastrointestinal infection, surgery and severe stress. Recognizing Celiac Disease

    Despite dramatic advancements in knowledge and testing procedures, recognition of this multifaceted disorder is lacking.1Celiac disease often is undiagnosed due to ignorance of the following:

    Pathophysiology — The traditional description of celiac disease as an intestinal disorder with malabsorption as the primary defect is a shadow of the real condition.

    Prevalence — In contrast to the historic belief celiac disease affected just one in 5,000 individuals, antibody testing demonstrated prevalence of one in 100.

    Diagnostic tests — Healthcare providers are unfamiliar with new and improved testing methods.

    Manifestations — Many patients do not have diarrhea and wasting symptoms of classic celiac disease. Extraintestinal symptoms predominate in people with atypical symptoms. How It's Diagnosed

    Diagnosis of celiac disease is made by a positive serologic antibody study and confirmed by histological findings of small-bowel biopsy specimens obtained by endoscopy and improved clinical response following a gluten-free diet.

    The single most important step in diagnosing celiac disease is to recognize its myriad clinical features. No single test can definitively diagnose or exclude celiac disease in every individual; there also is a continuum of laboratory and histopathologic results.1

    Positive anti-endomysium antibodies and positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies show celiac disease. Positive antigliadin antibodies demonstrate sensitivity to gliadin itself, the gluten in wheat.

    Not all patients have positive antibodies at presentation. When symptoms are present but test results are negative, further testing is warranted, including selective immunoglobin A deficiency. In the event the patient started a gluten-free diet prior to testing, suggest a gluten challenge of 3 months or longer in the expectation of antibody development.

    Positive small intestinal biopsy shows the degree of villous atrophy, yet this is not foolproof either. The gastroenterologist must be skilled in taking accurate specimens from multiple sites, and the pathologist must be skilled in examining them properly. In addition, damage may be submicroscopic, returning a level not yet detectable by histological examination.

    Additional studies include sonogram and genetic testing. Sonogram shows edema and abnormal appearance of the bowel wall. This is especially helpful for children or those who cannot undergo an endoscopy.

    More than 97 percent of people with celiac disease share the same genetic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype markers, HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8. While HLA genotyping is not specific for celiac disease, it has a very high negative predictive value. If the markers are not present, genetic testing essentially rules out the disease.

    Annual follow-up testing is warranted for patients with negative test results who continue to show symptoms. Recognizing Symptoms

    There are no typical symptoms of celiac disease, although the most common clinical presentation is unexplained iron-deficiency anemia with or without gastrointestinal symptoms.

    Celiac disease, by way of malnutrition, immunity or the direct toxic effect of gluten on cellular structures, has the potential to produce a broad range of symptoms, associated disorders and complications that may affect any organ or body system. Manifestations vary and may appear at any age.

    Nutrient deficits are responsible for many seemingly unrelated conditions, such as depression, inability to concentrate, anxiety, insomnia, defective tooth enamel, coagulopathies, hypertension, obesity, anorexia and excessive thirst.

    Associated autoimmune disorders may affect any body tissue, including type I diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism and Grave's disease, to name a few. Further, severe complications include various cancers such as B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, cryptic intestinal T cell lymphoma and enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma.

    Chronic diarrhea in childhood should provoke screening. Pediatric presentation for celiac disease could involve hypotonia, failure to thrive, growth retardation, short stature, convulsions, poor bone and tooth development, thymic atrophy and delayed puberty. Treatment

    Treatment is a gluten-free diet. Excluding gluten usually results in rapid healing of the small intestinal mucosa, resolution or improvement of nutritional deficiencies, and disappearance of many manifestations of celiac disease.

    The gluten-free diet is challenging due to the plethora of gluten-containing foods in the standard American diet. To succeed, patients need detailed diet instruction, including how to read food labels and identify hidden sources of gluten, such as in medications and supplements. Refer patients to a qualified dietitian if possible; otherwise, nurses can teach appropriate information.

    Inform patients about community help such as celiac support groups, which offer practical advice on how to shop and cook, and where to dine. Many support groups hold their meetings at local hospitals. Prognosis

    Clinical outcome depends on duration of exposure to gluten. The longer gluten is consumed, the more the body is damaged, and the greater the likelihood of health disorders and complications developing.

    Intestinal permeability improves within 2 months of starting a gluten-free diet. Despite a good clinical response, abnormal endoscopic and histologic appearances persist in the majority of patients.2Patients who receive adequate education about celiac disease and treatment with the gluten-free diet are better able to prevent intestinal damage and improve their health by dietary self-management. Clearly, nursing intervention that uncovers hidden celiac disease, provides nutritional education and promotes regular follow-up will considerably improve prognosis. n References for this article can be accessed at www.advanceweb.com/nurses. Click on Education, then References. Cleo Libonati is author of Recognizing Celiac Disease, and co-founder, president and CEO of Gluten Free Works Inc., Ambler, PA. This article copyrighted to Advance For Nurses and can be accessed online at their website at http://nursing.advanceweb.com/Editorial/Search/AViewer.aspx?AN=NW_08may12_n4p21.html&AD=05-12-2008

    John Libonati

    Everyone on a Gluten Free Diet?

    May 15th, 2008 by John Libonati

    The below article by Nadine Grzeskowiak is a good explanation of why the gluten-free diet can work for anyone and everyone and pitfalls of the celiac tests.  Medical experts speak of the gluten-free diet as if it is something strange, yet most unprocessed foods you cook yourself are naturally gluten free.  All meats, seafood, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, dairy (unless gluten was added to them), corn, rice and other grains,(besides wheat, barley, rye or oats), naturally do not contain harmful gluten.  Wheat, barley, rye and oats don't contain any nutrients you cannot get in other foods, so what is the big deal with not eating them?Nadine's article is excellent.  The only thing I would add is if you do eliminate the gluten grains of wheat, barley, rye and oats and feel better within two weeks, get yourself tested for celiac disease.  A positive diagnosis makes dealing with healthcare providers much easier.  That said, if it comes back negative but you feel better being gluten-free then eliminate gluten from your diet and be healthy.You can find Nadine's blog article at http://glutenfreern.com:80/everyone-on-a-gluten-free-diet/-John Libonati, Editor Glutenfreeworks.com john.libonati@glutenfreeworks.com

    Discussion | | Nadine Grzeskowiak | May 13, 2008

    I have thought for a long time about this very question.  Who would suggest such a thing?  I would.  The main reason I would dare to make such a statement is because we have been so negligent in recognizing and treating people with celiac disease.  Not a day goes by that I don’t hear about or speak to someone directly who has suffered needlessly for years.  The other main point I want to make is that NONE of the currently available testing is 100%.  The blood tests and endoscopic biopsies are great tools if they are positive.  If they are negative, I have heard of too many people tell me ‘I don’t have celiac disease, my blood test/biopsy was negative’.  This is a major cause for concern to me.  Both of these tests do not confirm you don’t have, or will never develop celiac disease.  First, neither test is 100% reliable.  Second, both tests are simply a snapshot of right now.  I have also seen test results that are clearly positive for celiac disease, but read as negative by a medical provider that does not understand what the results mean.  The genetic testing is great and it is my first choice when testing people.  The test is a cheek swab, I get results in one week and it is covered by most insurances.  I utilize Kimball Genetics in Denver, Colorado,  www.kimballgenetics.com.  I have run into this scenerio in the past week: a 12 year old on a gluten free diet for several months, a remarkable recovery from many symptoms while on the gluten free diet, and yet, she tests negative for DQ2 and DQ8.  Is she at risk for celiac disease if she eats gluten?  Are there other genes that could be looked at?  I am gathering more data on this because nothing is black and white with gluten intolerance, there are many grey areas.  Other than, of course, the need to be on a strict gluten free diet for the rest of your life if you have celiac disease.  Not much grey there. 

    So, this leads me back to the original question: everyone on a gluten free diet?  In my perfect world, the answer would be a resounding YES!  If people would simply try the gluten free diet for a month, most, if not all of those people will feel better.  It remains simply a diet change.  Change your diet and feel better, doesn’t that sound appealing.  To some yes, and to others, not really. Not without the proof that they need to change their long held diet and lifestyle habits.  It also sounds quite un-American to say ‘I can’t eat wheat, barley, rye and oats’, by extension, bread, pies, cakes, beer and pizza.  My most recent convert to a gluten free diet, said to me, “You know I don’t even miss the bread anymore, it doesn’t even appeal to me, I feel so much better on the gluten free food”.  This is a woman who has had symptoms for most of her 76 years and I had a hard time convincing her to try the gluten free diet for a month.  She is convinced now.  I can tell many stories with the same happy ending.  I can also tell you that most men have a harder time changing anything, let alone their diet, than women.  Trust me, I am a nurse and I have no reason to lie to you.  Try it.  Go gluten free for a month and contact me with your results.  GO!

    We have some very important information to share with you today.

    While we were at Columbia University's Topics in Gastroenterology, Dr. Steven Lobritto talked about cirrhosis of the liver and how he has actually seen people who were on the liver transplant list heal enough to be taken off once they started a gluten-free diet.

    According to our new book, "Recognizing Celiac Disease", 3.4% of people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease have SILENT Celiac Disease. Most patients DO NOT have gastrointestinal symptoms.

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver is a non-inflammatory hepatic (liver) disorder characterized by degenerative changes in the liver secondary to excessive accumulation of lipid in hepatocytes.

    The good news is that studies showed liver enzymes normalize after 6 months on a gluten-free diet.

    If you have patients or family members with non-alcoholic fatty liver (cirrhosis), who are not diagnosed with celiac disease, give them this information so they can get tested.

    Related medical studies are referenced in "Recognizing Celiac Disease." www.recognizingceliacdisease.com.

    Celiac disease is a multi-system, hereditary, chronic, auto-immune disease estimated to affect 1% of the human population (3 million in the US) that is caused by the ingestion of wheat, barley, rye and oats. It is treated by removing these items from the diet. Signs, symptoms, associated disorders and complications can affect any part of the body and removal of the offending foods can result in complete recovery.  

    Below is a recent message we received from someone who bought "Recognizing Celiac Disease."

    Thank you. My husband and I both have Celiac Disease and your book is by far the best one we have found in print on Celiac Disease. We love the format with the concise, current overview in the beginning and the detailed charts that make up most of the book. We refer to it on a regular basis as we research questions for ourselves, friends, family and others.

    We shared your book with the head of the pathology dept. at our local hospital, our Celiac Disease support group members at our last meeting (and encouraged them all to purchase their own copies) and even with our dentist.

    I wish there were a way to get your book to all of our local doctors since none of them are informed about Celiac Disease and few people are diagnosed in our area. My doctor had never dx'd a case of Celiac Disease before mine (I was on my deathbed 6 years ago), and our pediatrician has never dx'd a case!

    I have proposed that our support group purchase books for all of our local gastroenterologists, providing you are not planning to publish an updated version in the near future.

    If there is any way you recommend that our support group, or we personally, can promote your book please let us know.

    Thank you again!

    Suzanne Ludlam Fairfax, VT

    You can read more reviews Here!