John Libonati

Sams Club Raw Whole Chickens Are Gluten Free

April 6th, 2009 by John Libonati


sams_club_logo Sams Club raw whole chickens are gluten free. (Post below can be found at the gluten free weight watchers blog.)

I double checked the status of the raw whole chickens I buy. When I read the label yesterday it said the ingredients contain "chicken broth". I know a lot of broths have gluten so I shot an e-mail to Pilgrim's pride. Their website did have a listing of items that are gluten free but I did not see whole chickens.

It looks like they are GF (see below).

Kim

_____

From: Dreika Linwood [mailto:Dreika.Linwood@ pilgrimspride. com] Sent: Friday, April 03, 2009 1:17 PM Subject: RE: Other - Response Requested

Thank you for your email. Yes, our whole chickens are gluten free.

Dreika Linwood

Pilgrim's Pride Corporation

Consumer Relations Rep ll

903-434-7532 Direct

800-321-1470


PA Legislature proclaims April ‘Celiac Disease Awareness Month.’

Ambler, PA, April 03, 2009 --(PR.com)-- Legislation passed by the Pennsylvania House of Representatives General Assembly recognizes April 2009 as the state’s official ‘Celiac Disease Awareness Month’. With the passing of House Resolution 153 (HR 153), Pennsylvania takes the lead in raising awareness for celiac disease as the most common and most undiagnosed autoimmune disorder in the United States.

HR 153 was ratified unanimously, 196-0, on March 31st, 2009 with the assistance of its prime sponsor, state representative Craig A. Dally (R).

Geoffrey M. Roche, advocacy chairman for the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) and resident of Bethlehem, PA, collaborated extensively with representative Dally on the creation and development of HR153, and lobbied for its passage in the State House of Representatives.

"I would like to thank my State Representative, Craig Dally, and the entire State House for recognizing the impact this disease has on many Pennsylvanians and for assisting the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness in creating awareness that will ensure individuals with celiac get diagnosed, and correctly manage the disease." says Roche. “I understand first hand the impact this disease has on one's life and the need for education and awareness across our entire nation.”

The entire resolution in its entirety can be read on the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness website, www.celiaccentral.org.

Roche’s role in the successful sanctioning of HR153 and his passionate efforts on behalf of NFCA, stem from his personal experience with celiac disease, having been diagnosed with the autoimmune disorder just 11 months ago.

NFCA founder and president Alice Bast describes HR153 as, "‘The first step in reforming the US health care system in relation to autoimmune diseases, preventive care and chronic disease management.”

NFCA and Roche aim to pass similar resolutions in every state nationwide, providing assistance and resources for citizens working on legislative efforts for the purpose of spreading awareness of celiac disease, a disease which current estimates suggest affect 1 in every 133 Americans. Only 120,000 of individuals with the autoimmune digestive disorder, roughly 1 in every 4700, have been diagnosed.

“Early assessment of celiac is crucial in preventing the onset of complications such as other autoimmune disorders, serious illnesses, and some cancers for individuals with this disease.” says Bast.

Those interested in enacting legislation in their states should contact the NFCA at info@celiaccentral.org, by phone (215) 325-1306 ext.101, or visit the ‘Get Involved’ section on the NFCA website, www.celiaccentral.org for information.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune digestive disease that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. It is triggered by consumption of the protein called gluten, which is found in wheat, barley and rye. Left untreated, people with celiac disease can develop further complications such as other autoimmune diseases, osteoporosis, thyroid disease, and some cancers. An estimated three million Americans have celiac disease, but only about 1 in every 4700 with the disease receives an accurate diagnosis. Currently, the only treatment is a lifelong gluten-free diet.

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NFCA is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to raising awareness and funding for celiac disease that will advance research, education and screening amongst medical professionals, children and adults. Visit www.celiaccentral.org or call 215-325-1306 for further information.

Contact Information National Foundation for Celiac Awareness Whitney Ehret 215-325-1306 whitney@celiaccentral.org www.celiaccentral.org

recognizing_celiac_disease_cover_lg1 The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center has chosen Recognizing Celiac Disease as the supplemental reading material for medical professionals who complete its Preceptorship Program.

Dr. Stefano Guandalini, medical director of the center, recommends the book for both patients and healthcare providers. “The book is useful for prospective patients to determine whether their complaints are consistent with celiac disease. It is also an excellent patient resource for self management, especially in identifying ongoing and future health problems related to celiac disease and bringing them to the attention of their physician for proper treatment. “Recognizing Celiac Disease” is a useful reference that will serve as a helpful tool for health care providers and anyone diagnosed with the disease.”

The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center's Preceptorship Program is an on-site intensive 2-day training course for medical professionals. Candidates study under the direction of the Center's celiac disease experts. The course includes formal instruction, as well as hands-on training. This is the nation's only such program. More information about the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center and the Preceptorship Program can be found at www.celiacdisease.net.

“Recognizing Celiac Disease” is the definitive guide to understanding, diagnosing and managing celiac disease. It is a reader-friendly, celiac disease reference manual written for both medical professionals and the general public.

For more information visit, www.recognizingceliacdisease.com.

John Libonati

Jenny McCarthy Is Gluten- and Dairy-Free and in Shape

March 27th, 2009 by John Libonati

In Shape magazine, that is — on the cover of the May issue. Actress, author, autism activist, and mother Jenny McCarthy said she ballooned to 211 pounds after the birth of her son, who's now 6 years old. Weight Watchers helped her slim down since it taught her about portion control and to be conscious of what she eats.

jenny-mccarthy_shape

Then three years ago she switched to a diet that's gluten- and dairy-free, to match her son Evan's diet. Not only did it help her shed even more weight, but it's greatly improved her son's autism symptoms. A typical day consists of an egg white omelet for breakfast, then for lunch and dinner she enjoys fresh fruit and veggies (she purées them to make her own soups) with fish. For snacks she loves “those little packets of nuts from Starbucks.” Jenny also stays strong and flexible by practicing yoga, and is even trying to teach it to her honey, Jim Carrey. Check out the May issue of Shape for her 15-minute yoga sculpting workout.

Source: http://www.fitsugar.com:80/2971971

John Libonati

Tips For Dining Out On The Gluten-Free Diet

March 4th, 2009 by John Libonati

By Melinda Dennis, MS, RD, LDN Nutrition Coordinator, Celiac Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Avoid ordering fried foods, such as French fries or taco “basket” shells at a Mexican restaurant, which are fried in the same oil as battered foods or coated fries.

Check to make sure that liquid eggs held in a buffet line for eggs-to-order are not mixed with wheat flour (to keep them from separating).

Ask your server to request that the cooks change their gloves and use a clean skillet and utensils to prepare your food.

If you don’t feel that your needs are being met, ask to speak with the chef or the manager. Carry a restaurant card (available from several of the national celiac support groups and online) that lists safe and prohibited food.

Rice and corn-based cuisines, such as Japanese, Thai, Indian or Mexican, usually have many more naturally gluten free items available than American fast food or standard fare.

If you are with a large group and you prefer not to draw attention to your special diet, order your meal last so that table conversation is flowing and you can take your time. Or excuse yourself and have your conversation with the chef or your server near the kitchen.

If you’ve had a wonderful meal, tip generously, thank the chef and server personally, and tell the restaurant you plan to share your good experience with fellow diners, the local celiac support group and your clinicians. As restaurants are alerted to the needs of those with celiac disease, gluten-free dining out will be more and more enjoyable.

Above content provided by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. http://www.bidmc.org/celiaccenter For advice about your medical care, consult your doctor.

Posted March 2009

 

restless leg syndrome treatment

RLS from low iron in celiac disease responds to a gluten-free diet

Low iron levels have been associated with increased severity of restless leg syndrome. The following medical case report discusses four patients with low iron and restless leg syndrome who were tested positive for celiac disease and placed on a gluten free diet. All four had improvement on the gluten free diet.

"Celiac disease as a Possible Cause for Low Serum Ferritin in Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome."

Manchanda S, Davies CR, Picchietti D.

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, College of Medicine, 506 S. Mathews Avenue, Suite 190, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.

OBJECTIVE: To describe celiac disease as a possible cause for low serum ferritin in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS). BACKGROUND: Low iron stores have been found to be a risk factor for RLS with serum ferritin levels less than 45-50ng/mL associated with increased severity of RLS. It has become routine clinical practice to test serum ferritin in the initial assessment of RLS. Celiac disease is a common genetic disorder that can cause iron deficiency.

METHODS: Consecutive case series of four patients with RLS and serum ferritin below 25ng/mL, who had positive screening tests for celiac disease. RESULTS: We report four patients who had serum ferritin <12ng/mL and positive screening tests for celiac disease. All had celiac disease confirmed by duodenal biopsy and response to a gluten-free diet. RLS symptoms improved in all four, with two able to discontinue RLS medication and two responding without medication.

CONCLUSIONS: In patients with RLS and low serum ferritin who do not have an obvious cause for iron deficiency, we suggest looking for celiac disease by simple, inexpensive serologic testing. Diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease is likely to improve the outcome for RLS, as well as identify individuals who are at risk for the significant long-term complications of celiac disease.

Source: Sleep Med. 2009 Jan 10. [Epub ahead of print] url: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19138881

John Libonati

New IBS Guidelines Include Screening for Celiac Disease

December 20th, 2008 by John Libonati

New guidelines for the treatment of IBS published by the American College of Gastroenterology include screening for celiac disease...

New IBS Guidelines Offer Treatment Ideas

American College of Gastroenterology Updates Recommendations for Irritable Bowel Syndrome By Bill Hendrick

WebMD Health NewsReviewed by Louise Chang, MDDec. 19, 2008 -- New guidelines have been issued by the nation's gastroenterologists that are aimed at easing the abdominal pain, diarrhea, and other symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which afflicts millions of Americans.

The guidelines, issued by the American College of Gastroenterology, also offer hope to patients who've struggled with the condition and found satisfactory treatments lacking.

IBS is diagnosed in people whose symptoms include abdominal pain, bloating, gas, diarrhea, and constipation, or a combination of these symptoms. Though sometimes confused with inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, IBS is a separate condition.

IBS care uses up more than $20 billion a year in direct and indirect expenditures, according to William Chey, MD, professor of medicine and director of the Gastrointestinal Physiology Laboratory at the University of Michigan Health System. He developed the guidelines in conjunction with Philip Schoenfeld, MD.

"The last time the American College of Gastroenterology published guidelines for the management of IBS was in 2002, and the College recognized that in the span of five to six years there has been a remarkable explosion in knowledge that's become available that's helped us to understand the cause and management of IBS," Chey says in a news release.

Tests and Treatments for IBS According to the new guidelines:

Patients with symptoms typical for IBS -- and without alarm features like rectal bleeding, low blood count due to iron deficiency, weight loss, or a family history of colon cancer, IBD, or celiac disease -- do not need extensive testing before being diagnosed.

IBS patients with diarrhea, or a combination of constipation and diarrhea, should be screened with blood tests for celiac disease, a disorder in which patients can't tolerate the gluten protein found in wheat or other grains.

When IBS patients have alarm features or are over 50 years old, they should have further tests (such as colonoscopy) to rule out other bowel disease such as IBD and colon cancer. IBS patients and their doctors should consider treatments involving antidepressants, which have been shown to offer relief.

The drug Amitiza helps with women who have IBS with constipation; the non-absorbable antibiotic rifaximin can ease IBS and bloating as a short-term treatment. And Lotronex, a drug that affects serotonin receptors, can be considered for patients with severe IBS with diarrhea.

Certain anti-spasm treatments may offer short-term help with abdominal pain from IBS. These include hyoscine, cimetropium, and peppermint oil.

A probiotic called Bifidobacteria may help some IBS patients.

According to the guidelines, women are twice as likely as men to suffer from IBS, which often begins in young adulthood. Gastroenterologists have found that dietary changes have proved helpful, including the addition of dietary fiber supplements such as psyllium.

Chey says IBS can be managed in most patients with counseling, dietary and lifestyle interventions, and use of both over-the-counter and prescription medications.

The guidelines suggest many treatments might be tried, though the authors concede no single magical answer has yet been found to eliminate symptoms in IBS patients. But the guidelines offer hope for people with IBS that their doctors can try a number of methods to reduce discomfort, and that some of the steps that can be taken seem to work.

ARTICLE SOURCE: http://www.webmd.com:80/ibs/news/20081219/new-ibs-guidelines-offer-treatment-ideas

John Libonati

Shared Genes in Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

December 16th, 2008 by John Libonati

A 2008 study provides more evidence that there is a link between celiac disease and gluten. This article in Scientific American reviews the study.

Diabetes and celiac disease: A Genetic Connection Patients with type 1 diabetes have been known to be more prone to another autoimmune disorder, celiac disease, in which gluten in wheat, rye and barley triggers an immune response that damages the small intestine or gut. Now there’s evidence that the two diseases have a genetic link: they share at least seven chromosome regions.

The discovery, published in this week's New England Journal of Medicine, indicates that both diseases may be triggered by similar genetic and environmental mechanisms, such as certain foods, that cause patients' immune systems to become overactive and destroy healthy instead of infected tissue. Previous research has found that celiac disease is five to 10 times more common in people with type 1 diabetes than in the general population, an editorial accompanying the study notes.

"These findings suggest common mechanisms causing both celiac and type 1 diabetes – we did not expect to see this very high degree of shared genetic risk factors," said study co-author David van Heel, a gastrointestinal geneticist at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Van Heel and his colleagues studied genetic material or DNA from about 20,000 people, half of them healthy, nearly half with type 1 diabetes, and 2,000 with celiac disease. The overlapping genetic variants occurred on regions of chromosomes (parts of cells that carry genetic code) that are believed to regulate the gut’s immune system, the BBC notes.

Type 1 diabetes occurs when a person’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy beta cells in the pancreas that produce the hormone insulin, which is needed to convert glucose into energy. In celiac disease, a similar attack occurs on the small intestine when sufferers eat gluten-rich grains, causing inflammation in the gut that can lead to bloating, abdominal pain, nausea, constipation, diarrhea, fatigue, anemia, headaches, weight loss and failure to thrive in children. Whereas diabetes 1 patients must inject insulin daily to make up for their deficiency, people with celiac disease can avoid damage and symptoms by sticking to a gluten-free diet.

"The finding raises the question of whether eating cereal and other gluten products might trigger type 1 diabetes by altering the function of the gut and its interaction with the pancreas, the authors write. But Robert Goldstein, chief scientific officer of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, which helped fund the study, says it would be premature to assume from this study that gluten is also a diabetes trigger.

“I fear the newspaper headlines in the popular press will read like, ‘Eating wheat will cause type 1 diabetes,’” Goldstein tells us. “The presence or absence of these associations has to be linked to some biological consequence” for a person's health.

Article Source: http://www.sciam.com/blog/60-second-science/post.cfm?id=diabetes-and-celiac-disease-a-genet-2008-12-11

*UK Study Source: Shared and Distinct Genetic Variants in Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease, New England Journal of Medicine. http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/NEJMoa0807917

John Libonati

Gluten Free Restaurants – Philadelphia

December 16th, 2008 by John Libonati

Celiac disease - Gluten Free friendly restaurants in Philadelphia (listed alphabetically)

Applebee’s Restaurant

http://www.applebees.com/

Applebee Dietary Inquiries 888-592-7753 You can call this number and someone will provide information on gluten free menu items. I have spoken with them while seated in the restaurant – though you could certainly call ahead of time.

Arpeggio

http://www.arpeggiobyob.com

542 Springhouse Village Center Springhouse, PA 19477 {GPS} 1101 BETHLEHEM PIKE OR SPRINGHOUSE VILLAGE CENTER 215-646-5055 Mediterranean BYOB. Per my GI doc, the owner is very in tune to the needs of celiac patients.

Boston Style Pizza 447 N Sumneytown Pike North Wales, PA (215) 699-3977 Has gluten-free pizza as well as a recently expanded gluten-free menu.

Carrabba's Italian Grill

http://carrabas.com/index.aspx

2575 Maryland Road Willow Grove, PA 19090 (215) 659-3950 Has a gluten-free menu

Charlie Brown’s Steakhouse 324 W. Swedesford Road Berwyn, PA 19312 (610)240-0997 www.charliebrowns.com/ Has a gluten free menu and location information online.

Chipotle www.chipoltle.com Plymouth Meeting Mall location Website has a gluten-free listing. Staff and management were very receptive to requests as well as the food being delicious and healthy.

Five Guys Burgers and Fries www.fiveguys.com Check website for local sites – coming soon to K of P mall. Great burgers and fries! Locations I visited were very gluten-friendly.

JB Dawson’s

http://jbdawsons.com/index.html

Has a gluten free menu available online as well as upon request at each location. This is a local chain with five outlets –one near Plymouth Meeting Mall. The corporate Director of Kitchen's is very Celiac aware as he has family member with Celiac.

Jules Thin Crust Pizza

http://www.julesthincrust.com/

Offers great gluten –free pizza and crusts to make your own. Locations in Doylestown and Newtown.

Legal Seafoods

http://www.legalseafoods.com/

King of Prussia Mall. Great food and great attention to gluten-free concerns. Gluten-free menu is available.

Morton’s Restaurant

http://www.mortons.com/

King of Prussia Mall location is actually working on an allergy menu for customers, though other locations have been very responsive to gluten-free requests. My waitress, Gina, was very well versed and great at offering gluten-free alternatives.

Outback Steakhouse

http://www.outbacksteakhouse.com/

Has a gluten free menu available online as well as upon request at each location.

Pasta Pomodoro

http://www.pastapomodoronj.com

Won 2007 NFCA Gluten-free cooking competition Voorhees NJ

PF Chang’s China Bistro

http://www.pfchangs.com/

Great Chinese food. They have a gluten-free menu available and are very responsive to concerns. Plymouth Meeting Mall location is now open.

Redstone American Grill www.redstonegrill.com Plymouth Meeting Mall Have spoken with Director of Culinary Operations from corp office. Gave me local chef’s name and email as well as a listing of gluten-free menu items.

John Libonati

Erewhon Organic Corn Flakes 11 oz. – Product Reviews

December 4th, 2008 by John Libonati

These light and crispy flakes are made with simple pure ingredients - organically grown corn and sea salt. And, Erewhon Corn Flakes are 100% natural, low in sodium, and low fat. Great taste and great nutrition! Allergy Alert: contains corn. Kosher.

Ingredients: Organic corn flour, sea salt.

Product does not contain: Gluten, Wheat, Soy, Eggs, Dairy, Nuts, Peanuts

Nutrition Facts: Serving Size 1 1/4 cup Serving per container: 6

Amount per Serving: Calories 210, Total Fat 2.5g, Saturated Fat 0g, Trans Fat 0g, Cholesterol 0mg, Sodium 100mg, Total Carbohydrates 26g, Dietary Fiber 3g, Sugars 3g, Protein 2g, vitamin A 10%, vitamin C 2%, calcium 0%, iron 15%