Saving a life means more than just keeping a person from dying. It means helping them get well.

While practicing medicine as a registered nurse, Cleo Libonati regularly saved people's lives. Now her book "Recognizing Celiac Disease" is doing the same for people across the country and around the world.

Here is a letter telling how one family credits the book with saving their lives...

------------------------ Dear Cleo,

I have been "sick" most of my life (I turn 40 in July) with random things, too many to list here. I have been really sick the last 10 years, but started feeling as though I was "dying by the inch" in 2004. I finally broke down and went to my primary when premature ventricular contractions were occurring every 5-10 seconds that felt as though my heart was going to jump right out of my throat. I had many other random multiple sclerosis type symptoms, but the severity of the PVC's were what scared me the most, that is until 2006. I began to have many gastro symptoms that kept me in the bathroom several times a day with alternating elimination problems, I couldn't keep food down, and pain in the left side of my swollen, hard, tender abdomen every time I ate. I had an EGD and colonoscopy on 2/15/07. The three days before the test were the best I had felt in 4 years. Since I worked in Oncology and was used to seeing patients doing prep for them, I put myself on clear liquids 2 days before the Go-Lytely. So, I was gluten-free without knowing it for 3 days prior to testing.


Amy Fothergill

Gluten-Free Toaster Pizza Recipe

October 19th, 2009 by Amy Fothergill

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gf_toaster_pizzaThere are times when you are on a gluten free diet, that you just crave pizza. Luckily in today's times, we have access to many gluten free ingredients, like gluten free pizza crust. You can always make your own crust, pre-bake them, and freeze them after they are cool.

Once you have the pizza crust done, you can have a delicious, crispy crust pizza in about 10 minutes. It's all about the method:

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Autumn is in full swing with the leaves changing and crunching beneath our feet as we take weekend jaunts to pick apples and pumpkins. Once we return home we realize, what are we going to do with all of these apples?!

apple-gorgonzola-sandwichEating them plain is an excellent treat, especially the early season Honey Crisp apples, but sometimes it is necessary to get more creative and break the routine. This recipe was originally found in Southern Living, and has become a fall favorite of mine. It was not originally printed as a "gluten-free" recipe, but easily became one with a couple of modifications. This sandwich quickly becomes a satisfying and impressive meal.

Gluten-free School Lunch Options

October 19th, 2009 by Jessica Meyer

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Alas, the school cafeteria: A place where gluten and other allergens are free roaming. Don’t fret, there are plenty of wonderful GF conveniently packaged foods your child will enjoy (And many non-GF kids might get jealous of how delicious they look!)

Here are my favorite gluten-free products for school lunch:

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Want to know if your food is really, truly gluten-free? Depending on your own individual sensitivity to gluten, you might want to consider investing in a box of E-Z Gluten test strips. The E-Z Gluten test strip kit is easy to use, and you can have results in about 5 minutes. We use the E-Z Gluten test strips to batch-test our products in our catering kitchen.

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The Greater Philadelphia Celiac Support Group is meeting at Abington Hospital this Friday, October 16 at 5:45 pm.

GFL0809 Ann Whelan, publisher of the popular magazine Gluten Free Living will be speaking to the group.

Location: Abington Memorial Hospital 1200 Old York Road Abington PA 19001 in the Lenfest Auditorium

Time: Doors open at 5:45 for visiting vendors and interacting with friends. Meeting officially begins at 7:30 pm. _____________________________________________________ VENDORS THAT WILL BE ATTENDING THE MEETING

Cindy Swan

So the Doc says no gluten, answers to FAQs

October 12th, 2009 by Cindy Swan

For individuals just diagnosed with celiac disease or other gluten intolerant auto immunity issues, the prospects of learning a whole new way of eating can be daunting at first, especially for those eating the standard American diet (S.A.D.). Following are answers to a list of frequently asked questions:

What grains contain gluten? Wheat, barley, rye, and any flours derived from these grains. There is controversy over oat’s status.

What are hidden sources of gluten? Soy sauce (the second ingredient is wheat), barbecue sauce, marinades, teriyaki sauce, Asian sauces, or anything that contains soy sauce in the list of ingredients. Modified food starch, malted drinks, malt vinegar, most cold cereals, grain based veggie burgers, meatballs, breaded foods, durum and semolina pasta (another name for wheat flour), some seasoning blends, and many prepackaged foods.

What foods are safe to eat? Most whole foods are safe, especially fruits, veggies, legumes, oils, nuts and seeds, and lean meats, and for some people, dairy. Safe grains include rice, corn, millet, tapioca, sorghum, teff, buckwheat (not related to wheat), potato starch, bean flours, nut flours, and coconut flour. Some people may tolerate gluten free oats, but caution is advised as there is controversy over their gluten free status. Visit this link for more information.

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There are 3 weeks until the free Celiac testing event at the University of Chicago, Saturday, October 10. For complete details please read here.

Please call to set up an appointment as the event is expected to fill up fast..UofC

For more info: Call The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center at 773.702.7593.

-------------------- Author Information: Anne Steib, Chicago, IL Anne Steib gfreegurl@yahoo.com http://www.examiner.com/x-13312-Chicago-GlutenFree-Food-Examiner

Allison Hecht

Whip up some gluten-free waffles for breakfast

October 12th, 2009 by Allison Hecht

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Nothing beats a good, homemade breakfast. Fresh ingredients, a nice steaming cup of coffee, and a hearty appetite are all that you need. When you are tired of the traditional scrambled eggs, whip up this Apple Waffle recipe for a delicous, nutritious, gluten-free breakfast!

Don't have a waffle iron? Borrow one, or make this recipe at a friend or family members house for a delicious brunch.

Once again, this recipe is thanks to the wonderful people at Whole Foods. waffles

Ingredients:

1/4 cup cornmeal 1/4 cup Amaranth flour 1/2 cup brown rice flour 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon sea salt

About 20% of people with untreated celiac disease have chronic constipation instead of the classic symptom of diarrhea. As the rate of diagnosis improves, constipation is becoming recognized as a common symptom of celiac disease.

Constipation is a common problem in the general population of the United States. According to the National Institutes of Health, about 4 million people have frequent constipation. It is one of the most common digestive complaints in the United States, resulting in about 2.5 million doctor visits and 92,000 hospitalizations annually, although most people treat themselves. This high rate of constipation results in annual laxative sales of over $735 million in this country.

This article will discuss the following topics:

1. How to recognize constipation.

2. Natural remedies that have been shown to help constipation.

3. How to induce a bowel movement.

WHAT IS CONSTIPATION?

Constipation involves problems with stool formation, consistency, and evacuation. It is characterized by one or more of these features:

· Hard, dry stool or soft, putty-like stool.

· Difficult defecation.

· Infrequent defecation, less than one bowel movement per day.

· A feeling of incomplete evacuation following bowel movement.

Constipation can give rise to many different ailments including indigestion, a white coated tongue, bad breath, gas, hemorrhoids, hernia, body odor, depression, fatigue, headache, insomnia, and varicose veins.

The three main causes of constipation are abnormal bowel motility, malabsorption and dysbiosis. Each one, or all three together can cause constipation.

1. Abnormal bowel motility is altered peristalsis, where food passes through the intestine too slowly, due to ineffective muscle action of the intestines. It may take the form of spastic colon or atonic colon.

· Spastic colon is characterized by a spasms, (irregular and excessive muscle contractions of the intestinal walls), so that the muscles resist stretching and thereby decrease the diameter of the inside of the intestine. This restricts the passage of food.

Hard, dry stools are produced as the colon absorbs too much water from the slowly advancing stool. Spasms can result from magnesium deficiency, chronic stress, lack of exercise, lack of water or lack of fiber in the diet.

Spastic constipation is associated with variable degrees of abdominal pain or distress, erratic frequency of bowel action, and variation in stool consistency.