Posts Tagged ‘Diet’

 

Sweet Pot-Souffle Recipe

November 24th, 2011 by Sarica Cernohous


sarica cernohaus gluten free works

gluten free sweet potato souffle

This is a great way to start the day on a sweeter note, without the sugars found in more traditional sweet morning fare—something that works great for those following a gluten-free--and even grain-free--lifestyle. It is packed with fiber, Vitamin A, protein and healthy fat. Use sweet potatoes or winter squash that has been pre-cooked to make preparation fast and easy--there should be plenty on hand, either before or after a Thanksgiving feast!  This is a dish that pleases young and old alike.

Serves 2

Ingredients:

• 1 cup cooked Sweet Potatoes or Winter Squash, skins removed

• 2-3 raw Eggs

• ½ cup unsweetened Almond Milk or Coconut Milk

• ½ tsp. ground Nutmeg

• ½ tsp. ground Cinnamon

• 1 tsp. Vanilla extract (more…)


Celiac Disease and Gluten Free Diet Educational Videos

November 18th, 2011 by Cheryl Harris, MPH, RD, LD

Cheryl Harris Gluten Free Works

Finding out you have Celiac Disease is a big transition. Often it's a good one that leads to feeling great, yet initially it's a lot of information to take in at once to understand what you need to do for your health. Much of it is because we're been eating one way for 15, 30, 50 or more years and it can be overwhelming to to instantly unlearn everything we've done and change overnight. Wouldn't life be easier if you could take a doctor or dietitian home as a portable reminder of the basics? And so the Celiac Disease Video Project was born.

See below for videos of Dr. John Snyder, Chief of the Department of Gastroenterology at CNMC in DC, Dr. Gary Kaplan, Medical Director of Kaplan Center for Integrative Medicine and Cheryl Harris, MPH, RD Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist discussing testing, diagnosis and follow-up, eating a gluten-free diet and a short segment on when it's not Celiac. Though there are an increasing number of videos out there on people's stories of diagnosis and ways to make a gluten-free pie, this is the first of its kind to do a run-down of the medical and diet basics by healthcare professionals. The Celiac Sprue Association has been kind enough to support the project. (more…)

gluten free glutaric acidHaley is the mother of 21 month old Wyatt, who was diagnosed with Glutaric Acidemia Type 1 (GA-1) through newborn screening. Doctors have been unable to explain why a gluten free diet seems to be making such a positive difference to his health. Here is Wyatt's story...

Haley's letter to Glutaric Acidemia Group:

I thought I would share some interesting news with you all, in case there is a child out there like my son. We started my son on a gluten free diet in April and since then, his glutaric acid and 3-hydroxy glutaric acid levels have (more…)

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

Novak Djokovic: #1 Tennis Player in the World & Gluten-free!

On September 12, a gluten-free Novak Djokovic defeated Rafael Nadal to win the men's US Open Final. Djokovic, the #1 men's tennis player in the world, credits his adoption of the gluten-free diet at the recommendation of a nutritionist in 2010 for his incredible success in 2011. He has won an astounding 64 out of 66 matches and 3 out of 4 Grand Slams in 2011.

Djokovic said in interviews that removing gluten from his diet has resulted in his increased speed, endurance and improved play. In his own words, he feels better, moves better and thinks better.

While watching the grueling 4 hour and 10 minute US Open Final and listening to the announcers repeatedly describe it as one of the most intense they had ever witnessed, a nagging thought begged the question...  (more…)

FDA Gluten Free Labeling Update

September 9th, 2011 by Cheryl Harris, MPH, RD, LD

Cheryl Harris Gluten Free Works

The FDA is finally moving on regulating the claim “gluten-free” on packages, which is fantastic news!  Lots of people have put in countless hours to make this happen.  We’ve got 1 month left to comment—until October 3rd—and YOUR comment is vital to getting the law YOU want.

During the Aug 2nd teleconference, we heard that the comment period was re-opened and we might have a law by late 2012.  Several prominent researchers, including Dr. Alesso Fasano and Dr.Stefano Guandalini, spoke in favor of the new proposed legislation. “This is a standard that has been in use in Europe for almost two decades, & the science supports the U.S. adopting it as well,” commented Dr. Fasano.  I posted highlights of the teleconference, but upon reading the 90+ page safety assessment, I had a lot of questions! http://1.usa.gov/r4NDLA

The safety assessment suggests that for the most sensitive Celiac, (more…)

Gluten Free Works Author Jennifer Leeson

I have had the opportunity to connect with Dr. Stephen Wangen, the founder of the IBS Treatment Center in Seattle, WA.  Awhile back, at a CSA (Celiac Sprue Association) meeting I had the pleasure of helping Dr. Wangen with his book signing.  He had flown in to Denver to speak on his books, Healthier Without Wheat and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Solution. There was a full audience of folks, just like you and I, who were able to ask personal questions and learn more about living with Celiac Disease, gluten intolerance, as well as exploring other areas such as food allergies.

Since that time, Dr. Wangen and I have had the chance to talk about what the IBS Treatment Center does to help people really understand their bodies and how food can be affecting them.  He explores the possibilities of Celiac Disease, gluten intolerance and food allergies and helps people to develop a healthier lifestyle tailored to their specific needs.  At the same time, Dr. Wangen has observed the emotional affects these conditions can have on people and understands that not feeling well emotionally has an affect on how people take care of their physical well being.  What makes his practice so fantastic is the positive nature.  Dr. Wangen helps people view the changes by looking at the benfits and the gains and focusing on what people can have, rather than on what they can’t.  Here is what Dr. Wangen had to say when I asked him about his own experiences. (more…)

Amy Fothergill

What is “Healthy” Food to You?

September 6th, 2011 by Amy Fothergill

Gluten free produceIn the past few weeks, I've had the chance to ponder the question "What is healthy food?" It seems that many of us have very different perceptions. Maybe that's what stands in our way some times, we think healthy food and healthy eating is not obtainable.

It would be so much easier if my brain did not crave things like salty chips or sweet cookies but the reality is, it does. Maybe it's a combination of many years of being bombarded with advertising to make me think I want it or maybe it's as simple as it satisfies something in my head. I didn't take enough psychology in college to answer that. I do know if it's around me (like it is now as I write; you wouldn't believe what is at the end of the table at my sister's house) I'm less likely to eat well.

In my older years, I have realized that if I allow myself a little rather than denying myself entirely, I can balance the cravings with (more…)

Christie Bessinger

Gluten Reaction 101

August 29th, 2011 by Christie Bessinger

Living 100% Gluten-Free is a challenge. Most of us, even after we've learned about hidden sources of gluten and done our best to stay away from them....are going to get "glutened" from time to time. This happens most often with:

1-Cross contamination 2-Eating out at a new restaurant 3-Eating products that don't have any "gluten" ingredients...but still aren't 100% GF.

We have to be extremely careful with cross contamination in our own homes. Most of us are living with non-GF people. So make sure everyone knows which toaster is the GF one....and when your grandma is baking glutenous pies, cakes, and bread....stay far away from the kitchen.  Trust me, I know. Even a TINY bit of gluten will do THIS to me:

Of course, I often get the same reaction when eating out at a new place I'm unsure about. Many restaurants  offer "gluten-free" items, but they (more…)

In  Part 1 of this article about nutrient deficiencies in the gluten-free population, I posed four critiques and questions that I promised to answer in today's part 2. Without further ado, here we go...

Critique #1 questioned the small sample size of the research. I can't do anything about that, and there's not much to be said about it, so let's move on.

Next, I think it's easiest to address critique #3: How did nutrient deficiencies in the gluten-free population compare to Americans as a whole? To answer that question, I pulled data regarding nationwide averages from the USDA's Community Nutrition Mapping Project. If I amend yesterday's table that showed the percent of the gluten-free population who are deficient in given nutrients, and add to it a column for the national averages, this is what you find:

 

Nutrient GF Deficiency Nationwide Deficiency
fiber 74% 92%
calcium 82% 69%
thiamin 59% 19%
riboflavin 25% 11%
B6 35% 26%
folate 85% 40%
B12 29% 20%
iron 41% 11%

 

These numbers change the perspective a bit, I think. It's not simply that the gluten-free population is nutrient deficient. When you compare us to the national averages, it gets slightly more complex. In some cases, such as folate, riboflavin, thiamin, and iron, we're two or more times as deficient (as a group) than the nation. However, in other cases, such as B12, B6, and calcium, we still have greater rates (more…)

I was recently reading a press release from Nature's Path Organic about two of their new cereals. The press release made a familiar argument: the cereals "provide gluten avoiders with whole grains... unlike many gluten-free cereals which forfeit nutritional benefits..." The implication is that many gluten-free cereals (and other gluten-free processed foods, by extension) are more highly processed in order to improve taste and texture. But they do so by sacrificing nutritional quality.

There is some truth to this logic. Foods made from whole grains are inherently healthier than heavily processed foods, and I'll use our good old enemy - wheat - to demonstrate. I compared whole grain wheat flour (less processed) with white, unenriched wheat flour (more processed) across a range of nutrient measures. Not surprisingly, the wheat underwent a profound loss in (more…)