Posts Tagged ‘Celiac disease’

 

John Libonati

Celiac Disease Public Service Announcement

January 3rd, 2011 by John Libonati


Doctors are missing over 95% of people with celiac disease - over 3 million in the United States.  That's more people than autism or Type 1 Diabetes, yet celiac disease receives a fraction of the funding of these diseases.  Lives are being destroyed every day, when a simple change in diet could cure them.  Let's get the word out...

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Everyone on a Gluten Free Diet?

December 28th, 2010 by Nadine Grzeskowiak, RN, CEN

I have thought for a long time about this very question.  Who would suggest such a thing?

I would. The main reason I would dare to make such a statement is because we have been so negligent in recognizing and treating people with celiac disease.  Not a day goes by that I don’t hear about or speak to someone directly who has suffered needlessly for years.  The other main point I want to make is that NONE of the currently available testing is 100%.

The blood tests and endoscopic biopsies are great tools if they are positive. If they are negative, I have heard of too many people tell me ‘I don’t have celiac disease, my blood test/biopsy was negative’.  This is a major cause for concern to me.  Both of these tests do not confirm you don’t have, or will never develop celiac disease.  First, neither test is 100% reliable.  Second, both tests are simply a snapshot (more…)

Editors’ note: This case report illustrates that a person can live a long time reporting apparent good health and be completely unaware that they have symptoms of celiac disease. In this case, hematomas, (which are swollen black and blue marks caused by a break in the wall of a blood vessel), that developed on his legs caused the patient to seek medical attention. The ability of his blood to clot was severely impaired and yet there was no other manifestation of hemorrhage. (more…)

Christie Bessinger

Giving Thanks for Health…My Story :)

December 8th, 2010 by Christie Bessinger

 
 

Here's me at 1 year gluten-free

 This Holiday Season I am especially thankful for the health I now enjoy... it's been a long journey these past 10 years or so...but I am so thankful for the knowledge I've gained about living a Gluten-Free lifestyle...the benefits that have come from it, and that after 10 years, I can finally say that I feel like "me" again. :)    I've never really shared my entire experience, and normally don't write posts that are too personal... but perhaps this can help someone out there who is wondering if they might have Gluten Intolerance or Celiac Disease... or someone who has been diagnosed  and wonders if it is really a "big deal" if they HAVE to go gluten-free or not. I can tell you from personal experience that it WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE!!! It changed mine... and here's how: 

It all started back in junior high and high school. I just felt "tired" all the time. I can't even tell you how many times a day someone would come up to me and say, "What's wrong? You look tired." I even remember someone saying to me once, "You look dead." (ouch!) It seemed like maybe I was just depressed or (more…)

Janet Rinehart

Step by Step Guide: Beginning the Gluten-Free Lifestyle

November 29th, 2010 by Janet Rinehart

FOR THE NEWLY-DIAGNOSED CELIAC AND DH’er STEP-BY-STEP:  BEGINNING THE GLUTEN-FREE LIFESTYLE©

by Janet Y. Rinehart, Houston,  and Lynn Rainwater, San Antonio

BEGIN

A definite diagnosis of Celiac Disease (screening blood tests plus endoscopic biopsies) and/or Dermatitis Herpetiformis (skin biopsy) means a lifetime commitment to a gluten-free diet.

  • Take full advantage of your local chapter membership.  Our group leaders and contacts have experience with the gluten-free diet.  We can help you acclimate to the changes in your lifestyle. We welcome your questions.
  • Join national celiac support groups, for example: (more…)
John Libonati

The History of Celiac Disease

November 29th, 2010 by John Libonati

The earliest description of celiac disease was recorded in the second century A.D. In 1888 Samuel Gee published a monograph on celiac disease that "to regulate the food is the main part of treatment ... The allowance of farinaceous foods must be small ... but if the patient can be cured at all, it must be by means of diet.”

In the early 1900’s a carbohydrate restricted diet was advocated where the only carbohydrates allowed were ripe bananas and rice. Then in the 1950’s Dr. W. K. Dicke published work reporting that celiac children improved dramatically during World War II when wheat, rye and (more…)

Marissa Carter

Gluten Free Soapbox: We Are Not Crazy!

November 29th, 2010 by Marissa Carter

This week's gluten free soapbox comes from the personal archives. I'm absolutely certain that I'm not the only one who has encountered this, but it doesn't seem to get talked about much...

Often times, it seems that people who are on strict gluten free diets get viewed as high maintenance, or picky. The constant need to check and double check ingredients tends to bother some people. The reports of contamination and reactions go unbelieved, and people give that knowing look when “gluten free” is mentioned.

I even had a doctor say that the worst that could happen with Celiac Disease is diarrhea, so not to (more…)

Between 10 and 15% of adults within the United States will be diagnosed with a kidney stone.

Recurrence rates are estimated at about 10% per year, totaling 50% over a 5–10 year period and 75% over 20 years. Men are affected approximately 4 times more often than women. Recent evidence has shown an increase in pediatric  cases. The total cost for treating this condition was $2 billion in 2003.1

Kidney stones are an atypical symptom and associated disorder of celiac disease, however not all people with celiac disease will develop kidney stones. This article describes the pathway for the development of kidney stones that are seen in persons with celiac disease as well as the treatment and prevention. (more…)

Holy donations!  Congratulations to Dr. Alessio Fasano and the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland Medical Center on receiving a $45 million private donation from the family of a grateful patient. 

The donation marks the largest single gift ever given to the university system and will be used to expand the University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research and study other autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Type 1 diabetes. (more…)

The following questions and answers were developed by the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center at Harvard Medical School:

Q. What is it like for a person you see who is newly diagnosed with Celiac Disease? A. The gluten-free diet requires more preparation, taking food with you when you travel, making sure that you are safe in dining-out situations or when you are visiting with family or friends. So for some, it is very simple and straight forward and they are already experimenting with new grains like amaranth, buckwheat, millet, sorghum, and teff. But some people are (more…)