Tag Archives: Celiac disease

Is the Gluten-Free Diet Still Relevant?

Remember when the gluten-free diet was all the rage in the news?
 
Not anymore.
 
Now, it is more often than not treated as a scam.
 
The news even tells you it is dangerous…unless you are diagnosed by a doctor, of course.
 
Gluten is said to be something best left to doctors…the professionals.
 
If you beat the odds, and are actually successfully diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, most doctors think all you need to do to get healthy is remove gluten from your diet .
 
A woman told us her doctor said, “just stop eating pizza and bagels,” after she was diagnosed with celiac disease.
 
Two years later, her daughter was born with a cleft lip.

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What Were the Symptoms That Made You Search for an Answer? Did They Improve Once You Went Gluten-Free?

Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are related to over 300 signs, symptoms, associated disorders and complications.

Symptoms differ for everyone. One person might have gastrointestinal problems. Another might have a mental disorder, without any gut issues. Bones, skin, reproduction, muscles – any body system and organ can be affected.

We were the first publisher to report this in our groundbreaking book, Recognizing Celiac Disease. You can find them all listed on our Symptom Guide and our Gluten Free Works Health Guide, our online resource that tells you how to fix them.

When it comes to seeking a diagnosis, there is usually Read More »

Celiac Awareness Month – Four Health Problems Not Often Related to Celiac Disease That Should Be

Celiac Disease causes hundreds of signs, symptoms, associated disorders and complications. Almost all of them can be improved, reversed or cured by removing gluten from the diet and treating the symptoms individually.

  1. Dental Defects – Most dental enamel defects occur as the teeth are forming. White spots, weakness, ridges and malformed teeth are due to nutrient deficiencies. These issues are frequently said to be caused by antibiotic usage, poor hygiene or genetics. This important article discusses Dental Enamel Defects in Celiac Disease. This article explains how Dentists Can Help to Recognize Celiac Disease.
  2. Muscle Weakness – We tend to get used to how we feel, so many people do not realize they are becoming weaker over time. Nutrient deficiencies due to celiac disease before and even after we adopt a gluten-free diet, if our diet is not sufficient, can lead to muscle weakness. It is important to understand Health in Depth: Muscle Weakness in Celiac Disease. Read More »

Are Celiac Disease Blood Tests Pass Fail?

I was recently speaking with a friend at my gym who complained about a number of health problems that sounded like celiac disease. I suggested she get tested.

She answered that she was tested, but it was negative.

I asked when she was tested.

Ten years ago…

Many people report that their doctors tested them and told them, “you don’t have it,” after one blood test.

There is a great deal of confusion when it comes to celiac disease tests. This video answers the question of whether the blood tests are pass/fail.

15 Celiac Disease Facts Everyone Should Know

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Celiac disease awareness is growing, but misinformation still abounds. Here are 15 celiac disease facts every doctor, patient and member of the public should know.

1. 1 in 700 –

    The average prevalence of celiac disease in the United States 1950. (Mayo)

2. 1 in 100 –

    The average worldwide prevalence of celiac disease across all races today. (NIH) The average prevalence of celiac disease in the United States today. (Mayo)

3. $8,500 – The average annual estimated healthcare cost of each person with untreated celiac disease in the United States. (Cigna/Columbia Celiac Disease Center study) Read More »

Did you Know – Who Has Celiac Disease?

Who has celiac disease? While you cannot tell just by looking at a person, there are some common issues that can point doctors in the direction of celiac disease. Here is a list of 8 things that make a person more likely to have celiac disease.

  1. Celiac disease is the most common genetic autoimmune disease in the world. Celiac disease runs in families. First degree relatives are found to have celiac disease 4% to 12%. Second degree relatives also appear to have a higher prevalence.

  1. 100% of people with dermatitis herpetiformis, an intensely itchy chronic skin condition, have celiac disease. Dermatitis herpetiformis is the skin expression of celiac disease. It is an intensely itchy rash that sometime occurs symmetrically on the arms and legs, but may present anywhere.

  1. 1 in 5 people with collagenous colitis have celiac disease. 20% of people with collagenous colitis have celiac disease. Collagenous colitis is inflammation in the lining of the colon. It can only be seen under a microscope. Everyone diagnosed with collagenous colitis should be tested for celiac disease.

  1. Up to 8% of people with Type 1 diabetes have celiac disease. People with diabetes and celiac disease have been found to have similarities in their genes with seven common alleles. Everyone diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes should be tested for celiac disease.

  1. One in ten people with Downs syndrome have celiac disease. Celiac disease affects 10% of persons with Downs syndrome. Proper diagnosis and treatment with a gluten-free diet has been found to improve symptoms and quality of life. Everyone diagnosed with Downs syndrome should be tested for celiac disease.

  1. Almost 7% of persons with cardiomyopathy have celiac disease. Cardiomyopathy is an enlargement of heart chambers and subsequent reduction in their ability to pump blood. Cardiomyopathy responds to a gluten-free diet, possibly because nutrients like carnatine are better absorbed. Everyone diagnosed with cardiomyopathy should be tested for celiac disease.

  1. Until recently, celiac disease was thought to be a rare disease affecting less than 1 in 5,000 children. It is now know to affect 1 in 100 persons and can present symptoms at any stage during life. That means it affects children and adults.

  1. Multi Generation Family Sitting On Garden Seat

    Celiac disease is a permanent condition but was previously thought to be temporary affliction that children could “grow out of.” Once the immune system has been triggered, it forever identifies gluten as a poison or foreign body within the system. That means it will always attack when gluten is eaten. This attack causes inflammation, intestinal damage, and malabsorption of nutrients.

10 Quick Facts About Celiac Disease to Pass On

May is Celiac Disease Awareness Month. Here are 10 quick facts you can pass along to your friends and family to help increase awareness.

  1. Celiac Disease is not an allergy. It is an autoimmune disorder triggered by eating gluten in wheat, barley, rye and oats.
  2. You cannot “grow out” of celiac disease. It is a lifelong condition.
  3. The most common “look” of celiac disease is…totally normal. Not fat. Not skinny.
  4. Celiac Disease is the most commonly “missed” diagnosis in medicine. Over 85% of people with celiac disease go undiagnosed.
  5. Celiac Disease damage is cumulative. The longer it goes on, the worse symptoms and associated conditions become.
  6. Celiac Disease is real. It has existed for thousands of years, but has grown in prevalence. Tests have only recently been developed to detect it.
  7. Undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease costs billions of dollars each year in treatment for symptoms and complications as well as lost productivity.
  8. Celiac Disease is COMMON, affecting an estimated 1 in 100 persons. That said, it was thought the prevalence was 1 in 5,000 less than 10 years ago and 1 in 15,000 before that. The true prevalence may be higher.
  9. Celiac Disease symptoms can present at any age. 9 months. 9 years. 90 years. Often, symptoms present early, but are not recognized.
  10. Celiac Disease tests are not pass/fail and not foolproof. Tests should be administered again if symptoms persist because a “negative” can become a positive at a later date.

How Gluten Causes a Cascading Effect of Symptoms

You may have heard that gluten can cause over 300 signs, symptoms, associated disorders and complications. This is true and we were the ones who brought this to light in our 2007 medical reference, Recognizing Celiac Disease.

This video uses our Gluten Free Works Health Guide to show you how gluten causes hundreds of health problems in a cascading effect.

What started as the printed book in 2007, has developed into an all encompassing online health manual that we know can revolutionize how celiac disease, gluten sensitivity and healthcare are treated by professionals and people at home.

Subscribe to the Gluten Free Works Health Guide to recover your health and stay healthy.

Understanding and treating calcium deficiency in celiac disease

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body. About 99% of this essential nutrient is contained in bones and teeth with the rest being in blood and other tissues. Calcium is needed for strong bones and teeth and for nerve conduction, muscle contraction, heart muscle function, blood pressure regulation, glycogen to glucose conversion, initiation of blood clotting, many hormone actions, many enzyme activities and making acetylcholine, an important chemical for nerve transmission. Calcium plays a part in the prevention of colon cancer.

Most importantly, calcium opposes phosphorus as a buffer to maintain the acid-alkaline balance of the blood and is critical for milk production in the nursing of infants.

Calcium absorption in the small intestine is complex and has specific requirements.  Read More »

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