Posts Tagged ‘Remedies’

 

  • Page 2 of 2
  • <
  • 1
  • 2
John Libonati

Toxic Trio Identified as the Basis of Celiac Disease

July 23rd, 2010 by John Libonati


ScienceDaily (July 22, 2010) — Walter and Eliza Hall Institute scientists have identified the three protein fragments that make gluten -- the main protein in wheat, rye and barley -- toxic to people with coeliac disease.

Professor Bob Anderson from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne, Australia, has identified the three protein fragments that make gluten -- the main protein in wheat, rye and barley -- toxic to people with celiac disease. (Credit: Czesia Markiewicz, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute)

Their discovery opens the way for a new generation of diagnostics, treatments, prevention strategies and food tests for the millions of people worldwide with coeliac disease.

When people with coeliac disease eat products containing gluten their body's immune response is switched on and the lining of the small intestine is damaged, hampering their ability to absorb nutrients. The disease is currently treated by permanently removing gluten from the patient's diet.

Dr Bob Anderson, head of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute's coeliac disease research laboratory, said it had been 60 years since gluten was discovered to be the environmental cause of coeliac disease.

"In the years since, the holy grail in coeliac disease research has been to identify the toxic peptide components of gluten; and that's what we've done," Dr Anderson said.

The research, done in collaboration with Dr Jason Tye-Din, Dr James Dromey, Dr Stuart Mannering, Dr Jessica Stewart and Dr Tim Beissbarth from the institute as well as Professor Jamie Rossjohn at Monash University and Professor Jim McCluskey at the University of Melbourne, is published in the journalScience Translational Medicine.

Dr. Bob Anderson & John Libonati at an NFCA-sponsored event April 30, 2009 in Philadelphia, USA where Dr. Anderson described his research and vaccine.

The study was started by Professor Anderson nine years ago and has involved researchers in Australia and the UK as well as more than 200 coeliac disease patients.

The patients, recruited through the Coeliac Society of Victoria and the Coeliac Clinic at John Radcliffe Hospital, UK, ate bread, rye muffins or boiled barley. Six days later, blood samples were taken to measure the strength of the patients' immune responses to 2700 different gluten fragments. The responses identified 90 fragments as causing some level of immune reaction, but three gluten fragments (peptides) were revealed as being particularly toxic.

"These three components account for the majority of the immune response to gluten that is observed in people with coeliac disease," Dr Anderson said. (more…)


Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Probiotics and Prebiotics can Improve Health of Celiacs

July 20th, 2010 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

probiotics gluten celiacCeliac disease is a complex inherited digestive disorder that affects I in 100 persons worldwide. This condition involves a unique immune response within the digestive tract to gluten, a protein found in the grains of wheat, barley, rye and oats.  All persons with celiac disease, regardless of age, race or gender, are susceptible to intestinal damage when they eat food containing gluten or its derivatives. The treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet that stops damage and allows recovery.  Probiotics and prebiotics should be incorporated into the diet to improve the quality and balance of intestinal bacteria that inhabit the colon.

(more…)

Two Simple Ideas for Preventing Colon Cancer

July 20th, 2010 by Rudy Silva

Colon cancer starts with colon polyps. Polyps are growths in the inner lining of your colon walls. They are formed when the inner lining is irritated or attacked by fecal matter toxins. When you have colon polyps, you dramatically increase your risk of getting colon cancer.

To prevent getting colon cancer you need to prevent getting polyps. If you have polyps then you need to prevent them from becoming cancerous.

Here are some ideas that you can use in preventing colon cancer whether you have or do not have polyps. (more…)

Osteoporosis and Pilates

July 19th, 2010 by Rebekah Rotstein

       

As baby boomers segue from child-rearing to retirement, they find themselves bombarded by the media with information about osteoporosis. It makes sense, considering that more than 44 million American men and women age 50 and older have osteoporosis or its precursor, osteopenia. So between news articles about calcium and vitamin D, Sally Field promoting the drug Boniva on TV commercials and the now-ubiquitous term "weight-bearing exercise," we are all hearing a great deal about this epidemic.

Yet controversy abounds, with new findings questioning the benefits of calcium as well as the risks versus benefits of osteoporosis medications. The conflicting information is enough to overwhelm even the most media-savvy consumer. But the one continuously advocated method of addressing the condition is exercise. Not only does exercise help to maintain and build strong bones, but it can improve balance and reflexes and thereby prevent falls, the most dangerous threat to those with fragile bones. According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation, 60 percent of those who fracture a hip still cannot walk independently a year later. Clearly, the goal should be to stay strong, agile and upright. (more…)

Editors’ note: This animal study investigating the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, a strain of probiotic bacteria, on ulcers of the stomach lining of rats demonstrated that bacteria placed directly into the stomach significantly and according to dose reduced gastric ulcer size.  If the results of this animal research are reproduced in humans, it would demonstrate that probiotics may hasten recovery for people suffering from stomach ulcers.  The bacteria did not affect the function of normal gastric mucosa but normalized those with abnormal changes during ulceration. (more…)

John Libonati

Honey May Be Best for Cough, Study Finds

July 9th, 2010 by John Libonati

Dec. 5, 2007. Courtesy JAMA and Archives Journals and World Science staff

 

Honey. Photo: Andreas Praefcke

A bit of buck­wheat hon­ey beat the lead­ing over-the-coun­ter chil­dren’s cough rem­edy in re­liev­ing kids’ cough and as­so­ci­at­ed sleep trou­bles, a study has found.

  But the re­search—though pub­lished in a re­spected med­i­cal jour­nal—was funded by the U.S. hon­ey in­dus­try. Its au­thors rec­om­mend­ed fur­ther stud­ies to con­firm the re­sults, while not­ing that safe­ty and ef­fi­cacy ques­tions have aris­en around over-the-coun­ter kids’ cough med­i­cines. “Cough is the rea­son for nearly three per­cent of all out­pa­tient vis­its in the Un­ited States, more than any oth­er symp­tom,” they wrote in the re­port. “It most com­monly oc­curs in con­junc­tion with an up­per res­pi­ra­to­ry tract in­fec­tion,” and of­ten dis­rupts sleep. (more…)

Natural Liver Support Cleansing Products

July 6th, 2010 by Chester Ku-Lea

The liver is involved in thousands of biochemical mechanisms making it second only to the brain in importance and complexity. Natural health practitioners are also acutely aware of the detrimental effects on the liver of modern living, with its chemicals, excessive fat intake, pesticides, hormones, and stress. This suggests that we as a culture are in need of liver support. You should consider liver support supplementation if you: (more…)

Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Treating Candida Albicans Intestinal Yeast Overgrowth in Celiac Disease

September 10th, 2009 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

The frequency of intestinal overgrowth by candida albicans is increased in people with celiac disease. In fact, infection by this common organism, also called C. albicans or candida, appears to be a trigger in the onset of celiac disease.1 Candida is yeast, a budding type of fungus, capable of fermenting carbohydrates. Albicans identifies this particular yeast from many others.

Candida albicans usually maintains a tiny appearance in our intestinal tract unless conditions change to favor its growth. It can thrive and invade if the intestinal lining becomes inflamed or damaged, the composition of normal flora becomes disrupted, immune defenses become diminished or malnutrition reduces our health. Candida albicans infection is characterized by superficial, irregular white patches with a red base. Invasion of the bloodstream is possible and would be life-threatening. (more…)

Acid reflux affects millions of people every day.

Heartburn is the major symptom of acid in the esophagus, characterized by burning discomfort behind the breastbone (sternum). Findings in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD)  include esophagitis (reflux esophagitis) — inflammatory changes in the esophageal lining (mucosa) —, strictures, difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), and chronic chest pain. Patients may have only one of those symptoms. Typical GERD symptoms include cough, hoarseness, voice changes, chronic ear ache, burning chest pains, nausea or sinusitis. GERD complications include stricture formation, Barrett's esophagus, esophageal spasms, esophageal ulcers, and possibly even lead to esophageal cancer, especially in adults over 60 years old.

Occasional heartburn is common but does not necessarily mean one has GERD. Patients with heartburn symptoms more than once a week are at risk of developing GERD. A hiatal hernia is usually asymptomatic, but the presence of a hiatal hernia is a risk factor for developing GERD.

Here is some interesting information about acid reflux drugs. In 2006, over 100 million prescriptions for proton pump inhibitors (acid reflux drugs) were filled at a cost of $13.6 billion.  It is true that acid reflux drugs definitely help in the short term.  They reduce acid.

Unfortunately, the more powerful acid blockers (omeprazole, esomeprezole) can interfere with calcium adsorption and can aggravate preexisting hypocalcaemia and hypomagnesemia which are more common in celiac disease. [1]

They can also cause problems for people with cirrhosis. Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in patients with cirrhosis was associated with a risk of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and Clostridium difficile-associated disease, according to two retrospective studies. [2]

Finally, long term use can also lead to Vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 deficiency is already a common deficiency among people with celiac disease. The medications work by blocking acid secretion from the parietal cells of the stomach, but these cells also make a substance called intrinsic factor, which is critical for vitamin B12 absorption. Because proton-pump inhibitors such as Prilosec also reduce intrinsic factor secretion, long-term use can lead to a vitamin B12 deficiency. [3] 

Vitamin B12 deficiency is serious because it can lead to neurologic disorders. The neurologic symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency include numbness and tingling of the arms and, more commonly, the legs, difficulty walking, memory loss, disorientation, and dementia with or without mood changes. Although the progression of neurologic complications is generally gradual, such symptoms are not always reversible with treatment of vitamin B12 deficiency, especially if they have been present for a long time. [4]  

Here are some things what work well for acid reflux and won't destroy your health:

Dietary Changes:

1) Maintain a 100% strict gluten-free diet.  The immune reaction to gluten starts in the mouth and works all the way through the gastrointestinal tract, so avoid it. 

2) Doctors also now suggest that heartburn sufferers keep a daily food diary, so they are better able to see what food triggers are present in their day-to-day life. Once a list of common triggers have been found, begin eliminating foods one by one. Common heartburn triggers include chocolate, fried and fatty foods, and spices.  [5]

3) While suffering heartburn, you're advised to refrain from consuming alcohol, caffeine, over-the-counter pain relievers, and other stimulants, which change the acidity of the stomach, and irritate the lining of the stomach further. [5]

4) Decrease sugar intake.  Sugar causes acid reflux in some individuals. [5]5) Increase fiber. Consuming more fiber nutrient foods is another natural way to alleviate future suffering. Bulk foods help to absorb excess acid and gas, and allow your body to rid itself of toxins more quickly. For those who respond poorly to high fiber vegetables, fiber pills and beverages are an easy alternative. [5]

6) Drink more water. The more water you drink, the less likely you are to suffer the pains of heartburn. Drinking at least 8-glasses of water each day will rid the body of toxins and allow your body to expel acid naturally.

Remedies:

Here are some quick home remedies that can help. 

1) Baking soda - take a 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and mix with 4 oz. of water.  Drink it.  Baking soda is a base and counteracts the acid almost immediately.  It also has another benefit in that it cuts the reaction of the gluten proteins that cause the reflux in the first place. (If you accidentally ingested gluten.) It works quickly and is about as cheap a remedy as you'll find.

2) Alka Seltzer Gold - this is gluten-free and works quickly. 

3) Apple cider vinegar - this remedy was suggested Alisa Weeks,  a member of the Knoxville Celiac Support Group. "We use the apple cider vinegar with great success. We take about a teaspoonful with some juice."

4) Food enzymes - which help to speed the digestive process often eliminate heartburn altogether. Papaya enzymes are sold in chewable capsule form, and are taken immediately following a meal with a full glass of water. Both ginger and digestive enzymes are not medically proven to help with symptoms. [5]

Sources:

[1] Robb-Nicholson C (2007). "By the way, doctor. I heard that taking a proton-pump inhibitor could cause hip fractures. I've been taking 20 mg of Prilosec every day for a year. Should I be concerned?". Harvard women's health watch 14 (7): 8. PMID 17396273.

[2] Bajaj JS, et al "Proton Pump Inhibitor Use is Associated with a High Risk of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis" Abstract 740 presented Nov. 4.

[3] http://www.everydayhealth.com/publicsite/index.aspx?puid=f0ed5fe5-034e-4196-997b-f976c293a99c&p=1

[4] http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminB12/

[5] http://heartburn.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ/Ya&sdn=heartburn&cdn=health&tm=12&gps=89_111_1020_570&f=00&su=p284.8.150.ip_&tt=14&bt=0&bts=0&zu=http%3A//nhnh.essortment.com/heartburnhomer_rwel.htm

  • Page 2 of 2
  • <
  • 1
  • 2