Posts Tagged ‘Celiac disease center’

 


The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center is holding its annual free blood screening for celiac disease on Saturday, Oct. 9 from 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Celiac is a digestive disease that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. A gluten-free diet is the only treatment. 

But most people with celiac don’t know it, and a child will visit an average of eight pediatricians before (more…)


 

 

 

The Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University is starting a research study to assess the knowledge of chefs and the general public about celiac disease. They are also looking at people who follow the gluten-free diet (because of celiac disease or gluten sensitivity) and whether their quality of life with respect to restaurant eating is affected because of the diet.

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This just in from the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University…

The Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University will continue to host a Roundtable on Celiac Disease that deals with individuals and their families’ difficulties in living with celiac disease. The program will be held monthly and would deal with children, adolescence and adult issues with respect to celiac disease.

Members of the Celiac Disease Center who will be attending the Roundtable on Celiac Disease include adult and pediatric gastroenterologists as well as our nutritionist. We will conduct this program in an interactive format allowing airing of views and questions from all participants. (more…)

Saturday, May 14th was an evening of fabulous food and fundraising for the University of Chicago’s Celiac Disease Center at the 10th Annual Spring Flours Benefit which was held at the Swissôtel in downtown Chicago. The center is completely funded by donations and this event it vital in keeping the center at the forefront of celiac research, education and advocacy.

The event began with a presentation of the celiac Iceberg Award to the founder of the Center, Stefano Guandalini, MD., with the help of Amy Lukas, one of the very first celiac patients in the clinic. This was followed by silent and live auction events and unlimited dinning possibilities. (more…)

The Chester County Gluten Intolerance Group’s quarterly meeting will be this Monday, May 17, in the Potter Room at Paoli Hospital.

Paoli Hospital
255 W. Lancaster Ave.
Paoli, PA 19301
Directions: http://www.mainlinehealth.org/paoli

Vendors start at 6:30, speaker at 7:15.

The featured speaker will be Nancy Dickens, registered dietician. Nancy Dickens is
recommended by the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. (more…)

 title=The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center celebrates its 10th Anniversary with its annual Spring Flours Benefit at the Swissôtel-Chicago at 7pm on May 14, 2010. More than 30 restaurants will showcase gourmet gluten-free tastings to what expects to be a sell-out crowd. The evening will also include a tribute to its founder, Stefano Guandalini, MD, as well as robust Live and Silent Auctions.

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If you or someone you know has a child with a mental illness, behavioral problem or unexplained neurological issue, you must watch these videos. They vividly illustrate how gluten and celiac disease can cause neurological illnesses and how removing gluten and casein from the diet can improve or cure the child.

Eamon Murphy started exhibiting mental aberrations and problems eating at three months of age. By the time he was three, his parents were frantically trying to understand what had caused his developmental delay in walking and talking, and now his trances, seizure-like episodes and regression. After a determined effort by his mother and a series of extraordinarily lucky events, he was finally diagnosed with celiac disease…and FULLY RECOVERED.

Watch these videos NOW and then forward this message to everyone you know with a child with a similar mental illness and their healthcare providers…because it is unacceptable that any child should be unnecessarily consigned to a life of suffering and diminished potential when a simple change in diet may cure them.

Eamon is totally normal now. If he had not been diagnosed, it is easy to see how he could have become incapacitated within a few years as his body and mind became sicker and sicker. Eventually, he may have been labeled autistic or schizophrenic. He may just have been called odd and slow.

Was it a miracle that Eamon recovered? No. It was a miracle that Eamon was diagnosed…

Here are some facts:

Autism affects 1 in 150 children. Medical experts recommend behavioral management and specialized speech, physical and occupational therapies (costing an estimated $70,000 per year per child), medications, community support and parental training.

Medical experts recommend AGAINST dietary intervention, yet the gluten-free/casein-free diet that helped Eamon has been demonstrated in thousands of cases to improve or resolve symptoms.

Celiac disease is still considered a rare gastrointestinal disorder that affects children by the majority of health professionals. In reality, celiac disease affects 1 in 100 people of any age, classifying it an epidemic by NIH standards. More people have celiac disease than Type 1 diabetes, breast cancer or autism. Diagnosis of celiac disease is estimated to take up to 11 years from first presentation of symptoms. Only 5% of people with celiac disease are estimated to be diagnosed.

Gastrointestinal problems occur in about 20% of people with celiac disease whereas neurological problems have been seen in as high as 51% at time of diagnosis.

The treatment for celiac disease is removing gluten from the diet and correcting nutrient deficiencies and any complications that have developed.

Unless you have symptoms that doctors expect to see – chronic diarrhea, failure to thrive, abdominal bloating and pain, and anemia – your likelihood of being diagnosed is extremely low.

For a complete list of symptoms related to celiac disease including dozens of neurological issues and problems in childhood, visit Gluten Free Works.

An excellent resource that outlines over 300 signs and symptoms and explains the relationship between celiac disease and the nutrient deficiencies that cause them is the book Recognizing Celiac Disease, by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN. Recognizing Celiac Disease was endorsed by Dr. Peter Green, the director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University who diagnosed Eamon Murphy.

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The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center has chosen Recognizing Celiac Disease as the supplemental reading material for medical professionals who complete its Preceptorship Program.

Dr. Stefano Guandalini, medical director of the center, recommends the book for both patients and healthcare providers. “The book is useful for prospective patients to determine whether their complaints are consistent with celiac disease. It is also an excellent patient resource for self management, especially in identifying ongoing and future health problems related to celiac disease and bringing them to the attention of their physician for proper treatment. “Recognizing Celiac Disease” is a useful reference that will serve as a helpful tool for health care providers and anyone diagnosed with the disease.”

The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center’s Preceptorship Program is an on-site intensive 2-day training course for medical professionals. Candidates study under the direction of the Center’s celiac disease experts. The course includes formal instruction, as well as hands-on training. This is the nation’s only such program. More information about the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center and the Preceptorship Program can be found at www.celiacdisease.net.

“Recognizing Celiac Disease” is the definitive guide to understanding, diagnosing and managing celiac disease. It is a reader-friendly, celiac disease reference manual written for both medical professionals and the general public.

For more information visit, www.recognizingceliacdisease.com.