Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

 


In  Part 1 of this article about nutrient deficiencies in the gluten-free population, I posed four critiques and questions that I promised to answer in today's part 2. Without further ado, here we go...

Critique #1 questioned the small sample size of the research. I can't do anything about that, and there's not much to be said about it, so let's move on.

Next, I think it's easiest to address critique #3: How did nutrient deficiencies in the gluten-free population compare to Americans as a whole? To answer that question, I pulled data regarding nationwide averages from the USDA's Community Nutrition Mapping Project. If I amend yesterday's table that showed the percent of the gluten-free population who are deficient in given nutrients, and add to it a column for the national averages, this is what you find:

 

Nutrient GF Deficiency Nationwide Deficiency
fiber 74% 92%
calcium 82% 69%
thiamin 59% 19%
riboflavin 25% 11%
B6 35% 26%
folate 85% 40%
B12 29% 20%
iron 41% 11%

 

These numbers change the perspective a bit, I think. It's not simply that the gluten-free population is nutrient deficient. When you compare us to the national averages, it gets slightly more complex. In some cases, such as folate, riboflavin, thiamin, and iron, we're two or more times as deficient (as a group) than the nation. However, in other cases, such as B12, B6, and calcium, we still have greater rates (more…)


Gluten Free Banana Drunk Macaroons

July 28th, 2011 by Leanne Vogel

I hadn’t realized it while planning this weeks’ posts, but there is an ongoing theme for many of the recipes this week.

fiber + healthy and happy digestion

I just love fiber, don’t you?

Abusing my body throughout my teenage and early adult years left me with a very broken digestive system.

After going through countless tests, x-rays, medications, hospital visits, acupuncture, massage therapists, and exercises I said enough is enough! And I made a promise to myself that I would (more…)

Recently I made a loaf of bread using a bag of Namaste Foods Gluten Free Bread Mix. I bought this on sale at some point, and it subsequently sat in the pantry for a while. I'm not sure how long, but there's another 8 months to go until the use-by date, so I'm not worried. I like to have stuff like this on hand because sometimes I get in the mood to eat bread, and that usually means I have to make it myself. This time, I was also in desperate need of clearing out some pantry space, so making this mix was the easy answer.

This is the third loaf of gluten free bread I've made from a mix (Pamela's and Bob's Red Mill were the other ones I tried), and it did fairly well. It rose way more than I thought it would, but it was still heavy and moist the first day, only to very quickly dry out by the third day after baking.

The bread mix consists of a flour blend made from brown rice flour, (more…)

Everyone on a Gluten Free Diet?

December 28th, 2010 by Nadine Grzeskowiak, RN, CEN

I have thought for a long time about this very question.  Who would suggest such a thing?

I would. The main reason I would dare to make such a statement is because we have been so negligent in recognizing and treating people with celiac disease.  Not a day goes by that I don’t hear about or speak to someone directly who has suffered needlessly for years.  The other main point I want to make is that NONE of the currently available testing is 100%.

The blood tests and endoscopic biopsies are great tools if they are positive. If they are negative, I have heard of too many people tell me ‘I don’t have celiac disease, my blood test/biopsy was negative’.  This is a major cause for concern to me.  Both of these tests do not confirm you don’t have, or will never develop celiac disease.  First, neither test is 100% reliable.  Second, both tests are simply a snapshot (more…)

Editors’ note: This case report illustrates that a person can live a long time reporting apparent good health and be completely unaware that they have symptoms of celiac disease. In this case, hematomas, (which are swollen black and blue marks caused by a break in the wall of a blood vessel), that developed on his legs caused the patient to seek medical attention. The ability of his blood to clot was severely impaired and yet there was no other manifestation of hemorrhage. (more…)

Gluten Free Diets May Reduce Autistic Behavior

November 9th, 2010 by Deborah A. Klein, MS, RD

                                                  

The CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network released data in 2007 that found about 1 in 150 (8-year-old) children in multiple areas of the United States had an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The number of diagnosed cases of autism is on the rise; the reason(s) for this is unclear.   Autism knows no racial, ethnic or social boundaries.  Family income, lifestyle, and educational levels do not appear to affect the chance of occurrence.

Fortunately, dietary changes can make a significant change in people with autism.  Research is profound on the positive impact that a gluten and casein free diet can make on children with autism.  Gluten and/or casein free diets have been implemented to reduce autistic behavior, in addition to special education, since the early eighties {Autism, Vol. 3, No. 1, 45-65 (1999)}.  The scientific studies include (more…)

 

Editor’s note: Promising research published January 8, 2007 shows that adequate levels of vitamin D in the elderly are important to maintain cognitive function or thinking skills that include use of language, awareness, social skills, math ability, memory, reasoning, judgment, intellect, learning, and imagination. This study is called a retrospective review because the researchers did not actually examine anyone. Instead they reviewed data from records of 32 older adults who had been examined for memory (more…)

Lactose, commonly known as “milk sugar”, may not be digested well if you are either born with absent or low levels of the enzyme lactase or if your intestine has been injured resulting in absent or low levels of lactase. Lactose is a disaccharide or two sugars linked. It is a combination of the two sugars, glucose and galactose. If intestines lack or are deficient in lactase you will not adequately digest lactose and you will experience gas, bloating, abdominal cramps and diarrhea shortly after eating something containing lactose.

The lactase enzyme is on the surface of the intestine cells where it is very vulnerable to intestinal injury. Some people are born with absent or low levels of lactase, therefore have congenital alactasia or hypolactasia. Between 80-100% of people of Asian, Native American, or African ancestry are lactose intolerant for this reason compared to only 15% of those of Northern European ancestry. (more…)

Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Old Fashioned Stomped Lemon-ade

July 28th, 2009 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

This tangy, refreshing lemon-ade has stood the test of time not just for extracting loads of vitamin C from the rind, but for exceptional taste. Someone can always be found to do the stomping, especially children. Makes a quart. New wooden stompers can be easily bought, or have fun looking for the old, turned ones found at garage sales or flea markets.

Ingredients
  • 1 large fresh lemon
  • 1/2 cup Gluten Free Works fructose
  • 1 quart of fresh water
Equipment

A heavy glass pitcher and a wooden stomper.

Process
  1. Scrub the lemon with baking soda on a clean wet cloth.
  2. Rinse well then cut into thin slices.
  3. Toss the lemon slices into the pitcher with the fructose.
  4. Stomp a few minutes until the juice is rendered, but not so long as to mash the rinds.
  5. Stir, add ice cubes and enjoy!

pcom-420091

April 22, 2009, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN presented "Celiac Disease Today" to a group of medical students at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Philadelphia, PA.

Libonati's presentation was attended by first, second and third year students who had many questions about celiac disease symptoms and how to identify at-risk patients.

"It was very encouraging to see such an intense level of interest in celiac disease," Libonati said afterward. "Specifically, these students wanted to know how they as doctors will see it, how they test for it and educational materials they could give to people with it."

Student antendees received a complimentary copy of Recognizing Celiac Disease. Special thanks to Daniel Van Riper, president of the Nutrition Group for the invitation to speak and coordinating the event.

“Recognizing Celiac Disease” is the acclaimed guide to recognizing, diagnosing and managing celiac disease. Recommended by medical experts and national celiac disease support organizations, it is used by healthcare providers and patients in 15 countries.

For more information on Recognizing Celiac Disease, visit www.recognizingceliacdisease.com