Gluten free

Which Medications Do You No Longer Need Since Going Gluten-free?

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

On December 13, I posted a question on the Glutenfreeworks Facebook page to ask people who had adopted a gluten-free diet if they no longer needed medications they had been taking. The response was incredible. Dozens of people described how they no longer needed drugs, some of which they had been taking for years or decades.

Here is my post and their responses…

“I gave a presentation to a group and mentioned a friend who had been on Zantac for 20 years. I went on to say that once she went gluten-free the acid reflux disappeared. A woman in the audience stood up and said the same thing happened to her – she had been on it since she was 10 (I’m guessing she was in her mid to late 30s.).

My question for you is what medication (of any kind) were you on, before you went gluten-free, that you no longer need to take and how long did it take before you did not need it anymore?”

    •  

      Ashley Nikki Garcia Prilosec & zantec. ! 

      December 13 at 5:25pm · 
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      Lauren Smith I also took OTC for heartburn on a near daily basis. No more! 

      December 13 at 5:27pm · 
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      Surely Masquelier McMaster I’ve taken Neurontin for 10 years..GF since Sept. and realized in Nov. that I don’ t need it!  Read More »

Whole Foods 365 Brand Gluten-Free Mixes 86’d

Tuesday, February 9, 2010

Whole Foods 365 Brand Gluten-Free Mixes 86’d

Whole Foods Market has decided to discontinue its branded gluten-free baking mixes due to “lack of interest.” Back in 2007, the market introduced their own line of mixes – not to be confused with the Gluten Free Bakehouse ready-made baked goods. The mixes for pizzas, breads, cakes, brownies and the like were part of the store’s 365 Everyday Value line. The products initially were priced slightly less than the comparable Gluten-Free Pantry mixes the house brand largely replaced. The ingredient labels for the Whole Foods products mimicked those of Gluten-Free Pantry’s, although the actual manufacturer of the store-labeled versions was never confirmed by either company.

According to a statement from Whole Foods:

The 365 Gluten Free Baking Mixes have been discontinued and are no longer available through any other outlets. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience. There are many reasons that go into the decision to discontinue a product. Hundreds of new products are presented to us every day; therefore, the mix of products in each category is continually evolving. We evaluate attributes like value, quality, taste and convenience when we make the decision to accept or discontinue a product. Most often a product is discontinued to make room for a new product that offers a better combination of these attributes, or because there is a lack of interest in the product.

A Whole Foods customer service representative confirmed in an e-mail that customers’ lack of interest in the products led to the decision to end distribution. Interestingly, stores are being encouraged to stock Gluten-Free Pantry mixes as a replacement when the existing inventory of store-brand products runs out.

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Author Information: John Libonati, Philadelphia, PA
Publisher, Glutenfreeworks.com.
Editor & Publisher, Recognizing Celiac Disease.
John can be reached by e-mail here.

Why “Real Food” Is Important to the Gluten-free Community

Real Gluten Free Foods

“Real Food” can be defined as natural, unprocessed, traditional and nourishing foods that human have always eaten. This includes things like whole fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, herbs and spices, fish and seafood, and animal protein. These lie in stark contrast to our modern foods which have been grown with the use of pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, have very often been genetically modified, and had chemicals and flavorings (synthetics and other highly-addictive allergens) added.

For those living a gluten-free lifestyle, supporting “real food”, or “pro food” as it’s sometimes called, with our purchases is important because it reduces the risk of being exposed to and ingesting gluten. Processed foods — both conventional and Read More »

Why do gluten-free food prices fluctuate so much?

If you read my pages on Examiner.com regularly, you might have noticed that I do not include prices on many products that I review. While I’d be happy to list prices for everything if my audience was limited to Atlanta, over 95% of my readers don’t even live in Georgia. About 2% don’t live in the U.S.

There is another reason I don’t like listing prices on my reviews though, besides the fact that most people reading them don’t live anywhere near Atlanta. Prices on gluten-free products fluctuate greatly depending on where they are sold. Atlanta has the largest gluten-free community in the Southeast. The panhandle of Florida might have the smallest. It is common for patients down there to come to Atlanta to see Dr. Cynthia Rudert because many doctors down there don’t know much about celiac disease. Read More »

Why Oats Should Be Excluded from the Gluten-Free Diet

oats glutenThe suitability of oats as part of the gluten-free diet has been a source of controversy, with some groups pointing to research suggesting oats are safe and others pointing to other research demonstrating oats are dangerous to those with celiac disease. Close inspection of available medical research clearly shows that oats, even “gluten-free” oats, should not be included in the gluten-free diet at this time.

Until the early 1990’s, oats were excluded from the gluten-free diet, along with wheat, barley and rye. Then, a few pilot studies suggested oats may not cause the harm previously thought. The idea was proposed that people with celiac disease would find their diet more palatable, and would benefit nutritionally, if they were allowed to eat oats.

Heavy contamination of many oat products with wheat, rye, and particularly barley, was a concern. Companies began to produce so-called “gluten-free oats.” These oats were tested for the presence of wheat, barley and rye. They are vigorously marketed as “safe” for celiacs. However, studies show that even “uncontaminated oats” (oats not containing wheat, barley or rye) are toxic to an unknown number of people with celiac disease.

Early studies proclaimed oats to be safe, but they have since been judged faulty with poor validity. Nevertheless, they opened the floodgates to Read More »

Wild rice and chestnut dressing for a gluten-free holiday

This delicious dish has a number of steps, but it is not difficult, and the results are well worth the effort!

6 cups water

1 1/2 cups wild rice

1/2 cup unsalted butter

4 cups finely chopped onion

2 cups finely chopped fennel

1 tablespoon poultry seasoning

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds

1 1/2 pounds good quality gluten-free bread, crusts removed and cubed Read More »

“Add What You Like” Turkey Burgers

Yummy turkey burgers! Healthy AND delicious!

Being sick at a young age and having to go to numerous doctors has made me more aware of my body. I know when I feel great and I know when something’s “off”. When I realized food was the culprit of my illness I was persistent until we got answers. There were times I wanted to back down and settle because I was tired of fighting, but thank god I didn’t.

Although I have an amazing team of doctors supporting me, I have learned I’m my own body’s expert. I know what foods make my stomach hurt and I know what Read More »

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