Archive for the ‘Gluten free’ Category

 

Gluten free diet cards from Glutenfreeworks.com

July 31st, 2009 by John Libonati


gluten-free-diet-card-3-images-lrge

Glutenfreeworks.com has comprehensive gluten-free diet cards that lists unsafe foods and ingredients (including hidden) broken down by categories: whole grains & cereals, flours, thickeners, sweeteners, distilled spirits, fermented, cooked products, baked products, protein polymers, brewed, germ/bran and other.

Gluten-Free Diet Cards make dining out and shopping for groceries easy. These cards are perfect for eating out at restaurants or comparing ingredient labels when shopping for groceries. No more long explanations to waiters and managers. Just hand them the card. They’ll compare the ingredients to their recipes and let you know what you can have. No more wondering if an ingredient is safe or not when shopping. Just check it against your Gluten Free Works Diet Card. (Always call the company though if you’re unsure!)

The cards are 4″ by 3 1/2″ and fold to wallet size. See what they look like here. Gluten Free Diet Cards

They cost $6.50 for 5 cards, $30 for 25 cards, or $50 for 50 cards. Shipping is included in the price.

You can also get 5 free Gluten-free diet cards when you order a copy of Recognizing Celiac Disease.


THIS SPECIAL IS OVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

general-mills-gluten-free-mixes

Here is a great offer I found on a gluten-free list-serve yesterday.

General Mills jumped into the gluten-free market with their gluten-free Rice Chex. They quickly followed with Chocolate and Strawberry Chex and has launched a growing line of gluten-free baking mixes. Reaction in the gluten-free community has been strongly positive. Now we have another reason to like General Mills.

For a limited time, you can contact General Mills to receive a coupon for a free Gluten Free Betty Crocker baking mix. At $4.49 per box, that’s a pretty good freebie!

The list-serve included a message from General Mills:

“Folks can let us know if they want ongoing info/offers about General Mills’ growing line of GF products… If they call our Consumer Services number: 1(800)446-1898 (same as is on the boxes), they can sign up. The real perk of this re: the new products is that we have coupons that we’ll be sending to each household that signs up this summer so they can try a box of the new Betty Crocker® Gluten Free Dessert Mixes completely on us.”

I called for my coupons today. Here is how it works.

Call General Mills Consumer Services number: 1(800) 446-1898. At the main menu, hit #4 or say “four.”

This will take you to a customer representative. I waited about 5 minutes for a representative, a friendly woman named Bridget.

I told Bridget that I was interested in the free gluten-free baking coupons.

She said sure and asked me a few questions. She asked for my zip code, whether my household did not limit gluten ingestion, limited gluten or was gluten-free. She then asked how many people live in the house and where we normally shop for gluten-free food – the name and street address of the store. After that, she requested a phone number and e-mail. (She assured me General Mills does not share private information.)

It was that easy. My coupons are coming the second week of August.

Call today. Nothing beats a freebie – especially when it is gluten-free!

safeway-logo

The following list of gluten free foods was provided by Safeway July 7, 2009. -John Libonati, Editor. Glutenfreeworks.com

SAFEWAY CELIAC SPRUE GLUTEN-FREE PRODUCT LIST

Please note that these products also apply to Vons, Dominick’s, Randalls, Tom Thumb and Genuardi’s. (more…)

John Libonati

Walmart Now Carrying Gluten Free Products!

June 26th, 2009 by John Libonati

walmart-logo
It’s true! Walmart is now carrying gluten free products in test stores with a roll out across the country to follow. Below is a letter from the woman who made it happen, Celiac Sprue Association chapter president and National Foundation for Celiac Awareness volunteer – Carolyn Lynch McKinley. She’s a gluten free dynamo!

This morning my dream came true. I waited two years to the day and it happened. I walked into Walmart and it has been remodeled with new Gluten Free 12 foot aisle. For those of you near the Bentonville store you will find the items below in grocery aisle 9. Words can not express how excited I am to have a store in our community that can help customers save money so they can live better.

The following are currently on the shelf and it is still getting stocked. All of these listed below are quality gluten free food and you can save around $1.00 buying it at Walmart.

Erewhon crispy brown rice cereal
Glutino – pretzels, crackers
Envirokids and Natures Path cereal
Ener g bread
Schar buns and pasta
Gluten free pantry muffin mix
Pamela’s mix and cookies
Mi-Del cookies
Enjoy life bars and cookies
Lundberg chips
Blue Diamond crackers
Bakery on Main granola
Mrs. Leepers dinner mixes
Tinkyada pastas
Bobs red mill
Hodgson muffin mix
Road’s end organic
I will keep you posted as more items are stocked!! And don’t forget the Great Value Brand will label Gluten Free if it truly is.

Several stores around the country are getting the gf section. Right now I know one store in Springfield, MO and another is Vineland, NJ. If the store does not have a gf section, the gf food will slowly go throughout the aisles.

Thank you to everyone who provide support on this project. Your time was much appreciated.

Carolyn McKinley
CSA Chapter 73 President, NW AR/SW MO
and Volunteer, NFCA

John Libonati

Burts Bees Gluten-Free Lip Products

June 25th, 2009 by John Libonati

burts-bees-lip-products3This just in from a member of the Las Vegas listserve. This was Burts Bees customer response to a question about whether their lip products were gluten-free. Burts Bees Consumer Care number is below so you can contact them about their other products.

Dear Susan:

Thank you for contacting us with your inquiry, we do apologize that we are unable to provide you with a gluten free list at this moment; all of our lip products with the exception of our Res-Q lip balm with SPF 15 are gluten free. We thank you for making Burt’s Bees your Natural Personal Skin Care company, in the meantime if you have any additional questions and or concerns, please feel free to contact us with your inquiries.

Best Regards,

Tiffany K.

Consumer Care Specialist
Burt’s Bees Inc
1-800-849-7112 option 2, then 1
Mon-Fri 10am-4:30pm EST

Please consider the environment before printing this email

*Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly
endless.*

* Come Celebrate our 25th anniversary with us at www.burtsbees.com *

crayola_crayons_gluten_free

The question was raised regarding gluten-free crayons and what type are gluten-free. We contacted Crayola to determine the gluten-free status of their crayons and other products. See below. Please note that Crayola licenses their name to other manufacturers, bath products, cooking products, etc. Crayola only knows the gluten-free status of products they make. If the product is not made by them, the manufacturer should be contacted directly.

Question:

Hi Glutenfreeworks.

I am looking for a gluten-free crayons. I wonder whether you have one or if not could you give me some idea where can I get it from? Thank you and await your reply.
-I.

Answer:

Crayola crayons are gluten-free. We just spoke with a safety representative at the company. Their crayons do not contain wheat, barley, rye or oats. They are also not made on a manufacturing line that uses any of these grains.

The only products Crayola manufactures that contain, or may contain, gluten are their Crayola Dough and modeling compounds. The Crayola Dough contains wheat. The modeling compounds are made on the same line after a thorough wash using a gluten-free cleaner.

The following information can be found on the Crayola website. Crayola
——————————————–
The exact ingredients of our products are proprietary, however, we are happy to provide you with the 7 most common ingredient requests NOT FOUND in products currently manufactured by Crayola–This does not include products manufactured under license. Please check packaging carefully to determine manufacturing company.

Peanuts
Shellfish
Fish
Tree Nuts
Eggs
Milk
Latex

(Latex gloves are one of the personal protection options requested by and available to our employees for the occasional handling of raw materials and finished goods during the product manufacturing process.)

***We are often asked if any of our products contain gluten (wheat flour). Gluten is contained only in Crayola Dough. Other Crayola modeling materials, including Model Magic modeling compound, Modeling Clay, Air-Dry Clay, and Model Magic Fusion are gluten free. All of these products, however, are produced on the same machinery. Although the machines are cleaned prior to the start of each production run, there is a slight possibility that trace amounts of gluten from Crayola Dough may be present in the other modeling compound products.***

For information regarding specific ingredients not listed, please call us at 1-800-272-9652 weekdays between 9 AM and 4 PM Eastern Time.
—————–

garret-children-tested-for-celiac-disease

This post answers the common question – When is the best time to introduce gluten to a child’s diet when celiac disease runs in the family?

Question:

Hi John,

I was wondering if you have any information about when to introduce a baby to gluten if there is a gluten intolerance in the family. I work with babies with special needs and I am seeing a growing need for some accurate information on this. I am sure you are not surprised.

I know that some research seems to be indicating a good time to try a small amount of gluten is between 4-6 months. It seems that older research said older than 6 months. Do you have any knowledge on this subject? I am very curious but hate to share inaccurate information.

I have found some information on the internet, but wanted another opinion.

Thanks for any help you may be able to offer……
Alisa W.
Celi-ACT Support Group

Alisa Weeks
Early Interventionist
Tennessee Early Intervention System

Answer:

Hi Alisa,

Regarding when to introduce children to gluten is a difficult question. There was a study that “showed” introduction at between 4 and 6 months had some benefit, but this study was poorly performed and subsequently shown to be in error.

Really, there is no proper time to introduce gluten to prevent the development of active celiac disease. Every person is different and even siblings can exhibit different symptoms. 1st degree relatives have about an 11% chance of having celiac disease, so there is an increased chance that the child will have it. (As an aside, my sister with celiac disease has two boys, 2 1/2 and 1. She won’t let either touch it because she doesn’t want to risk it.)

If the parents of an infant or young child with familial risk to celiac disease decide to risk exposure to gluten, Cleo Libonati advises not introducing gluten before the age of three.

Why three?

Children do not reliably produce antibodies before the age of three which means antibody testing could be inconclusive and misleading if symptoms arise. Suppose the child does not develop the classic presentation of diarrhea but instead atypical symptoms that mimic other disorders. The symptoms could be dismissed altogether and not considered as presentations of celiac disease.

Harm could then occur unnoticed such as development of defective tooth enamel in unerupted permanent teeth (in the gums) or neurological disorders such as epilepsy that would show up later, with or without poor growth and development. Brain development is rapid in the first year particularly so that mental, social and behavioral skills could be adversely affected.

If celiac disease testing is performed in a young child, the following should be carefully considered before determining whether a negative result is truly negative.

• Children under the age of 2 years do not produce tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies, therefore the best time to begin measuring antibodies is after children reach age 2 to 3 years.

• In clinical practice tTG lacks the reported sensitivity. Specificity is reported between 95% and 99% in adults, falling to 73% in children at the recommended cut-off value of 20 IU.3 tTG is reported to be less reliable in early stage celiac disease without villous atrophy, the elderly, children under 3 years of age, smokers and advanced celiac disease.

• In screening relatives of patients with celiac disease, evidence showing discordance in testing suggests that both tTG and EMA should be used to avoid false negative results.

• EMA is reported less reliable in early stage celiac disease without villous atrophy, the elderly, children under 3 years of age, smokers and advanced celiac disease.

• EMA positivity with normal biopsy was found to be a very early predictor for later overt celiac disease, and necessitates further follow-up, especially if the child is AGA-positive and there is a family history of celiac disease.

• A substantial proportion of patients with true celiac disease are EMA negative.

• AGA testing had 100% sensitivity for diagnosis in children less than 18 years of age with iron deficiency anemia compared to EMA sensitivity of 81.8% in the same study.

In any case, the mother must watch the child for symptoms of nutrient deficiencies after the introduction of dietary gluten – whenever (if) she starts him or her. Children under the age of two seem to present with classic signs of failure to thrive, diarrhea, however, after that age atypical symptoms become predominant. Use Recognizing Celiac Disease to identify changes in behavior, growth, skin, hair, eyes, intelligence – anything at all – because that age period is a critical time in growth and development of the body and the mind.

Here are two videos about a child who presented with atypical symptoms at age 3 months, whose mother knew she had celiac disease but was told her children could not have it because it was so rare…and even if they did, she would recognize it because the kids would have the same symptoms she did: diarrhea, weight loss, and fatigue. Her son had neurological symptoms only, disturbing schizophrenic-like episodes and you will see it was a miracle that he was diagnosed at all. You may recognize his symptoms in other children you know who you never suspected of having celiac disease. These videos are a real eye-opener and exactly why people need Recognizing Celiac Disease – so they can determine whether symptoms are related to celiac disease and the causes when they are. It is very likely that many children are being affected just as this little boy was…it is far less likely that the events that led to his diagnosis will happen for them.

Part 1 – Celiac Disease Manifesting as a Mental Aberration in a Baby

Part 2 – Celiac Disease Manifesting as a Mental Aberration in a Baby

References:

Cleo J. Libonati. Recognizing Celiac Disease, Fort Washington, PA, USA: GFW Publishing, 2007. www.recognizingceliacdisease.com

Abrams JA, Diamond B, Rotterdam H, Green PH. Seronegative celiac disease: increased prevalence with lesser degrees of villous atrophy. Dig Dis Sci. Apr 2004;49(4):546-50.

Lurz E, Scheidegger U, Spalinger J, Schöni M, Schibli S. Clinical presentation of celiac disease and the diagnosic accuracy of serologic markers in children. Eur J Pediatr. Oct 2008. Epub.

Donaldson MR, Book LS, Leiferman KM, Zone JJ, Neuhausen SL. Strongly positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies are assodciated with Marsh 3 histopathology in adult and pediatric celiac disease. J Clin Gastroenterol. Mar 2008:42(3):256-60.

Donaldson MR, Firth SD, Wimpee H, et al. Correlation of duodenal histology with tissue transglutaminase and endomysial antibody levels in pediatric celiac diasese. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. May 2007;5(5):567-73.

Esteve M, Rosinach M, Fernández-Bañares F, et al. Spectrum of gluten-sensitive enteropathy in first degree relatives of patients with celiac disease: clinical relevance of lymphocytic enteritis. Gut. Dec 2006;55(12):1739-45.

Sanders DS, Hurlstone DP, McAlindon ME, et al. Antibody negative celiac disease presenting in elderly people – an easily missed diagnosis. BMJ. Apr 2005; 330(7494):775-776.

Utiyama SR, Nass FR, Kotze LM, Nisihara RM, Ambrosio AR, Messias-Reason IT. Serological screening of relatives of celiac disease patients: antiendomysium antibodies, anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies or both? Arq Gastroenterol. Apr-Jun 2007;44(2):156-61.

Boger CP, Thomas PW, Nicholas DS, Surgenor SL, Snook JA. Determinants of endomysial antibody status in untreated celiac disease. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. Oct 2007; 19(10):890-5.

Grodzinsky E, Fälth-Magnusson K, Högberg L, Jansson G, Laurin P, Stenhammar L. IgA endomysium antibodies – an early predictor for celiac disease in children without villous atrophy. Acta paediatr. Jul 2008;97(7):972-6.

Shah VH, Rotterdam H, Kotler DP, Fasano A, Green PH. All that scallops is not celiac disease. Gastrointest Endosc. Jun 2000;51(6):717-20.

starbucks-gluten-free-cake

(UPDATE: Starbucks no longer carries the Valencia Orange Cake.)

Starbucks Corp. will begin selling its first gluten-free pastry in its U.S. stores next month in response to requests from its customers.

The pastry, called Valencia Orange Cake, will be made with seven ingredients which are all 100 percent gluten-free, the company said. The cake will be sold in individually wrapped packages for $2.25 each and will be available beginning May 5.

Starbucks said it wanted to offer its gluten-free customers more choices.

“I think one of the things we learned right from the get-go from our gluten-free customers is they can’t eat away from home very easily,” said Adrienne Knapp, a product manager in the food category at Starbucks. “A cake is actually really hard to find for someone that’s a gluten-free consumer.”

Gluten is a protein common in rye, wheat, barley and other grains. More than 3 million Americans are thought to suffer from a condition called celiac disease, which is associated with intolerance to gluten. Even more people claim they are sensitive to wheat and other gluten-filled grains.

Starbucks said it has received numerous requests from its customers for gluten-free foods on its mystarbucksidea.com Web site. The site allows customers to submit ideas for how to improve the company, its drinks and its food.

Source: http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2009/04/17/ap6305750.html

rice_chex

General Mills Announcement
3/31/09

“Thank you for contacting General Mills regarding gluten in Corn Chex cereal. General Mills is reformulating the following Big G Cereals to gluten free status:

· Corn Chex
· Honey Nut Chex
· Strawberry Chex
· Chocolate Chex
· Cinnamon Chex

As was the case with Gluten Free Rice Chex, the barley malt ingredient was removed and replaced with another ingredient. Production has begun, so you may start seeing the gluten free formulas on store shelves now. All 5 products should be widely available across the U.S. by June 1, 2009. As with all reformulated products, both products may be on store shelves at the same time so please read labels/packaging carefully, examining the product packaging to ensure that the cereal inside the box is in fact the new, gluten free product. Look for “NOW GLUTEN FREE” or “GLUTEN FREE” on the front/side/back panels.

In addition, the following Betty Crocker Gluten Free mixes will be available at approximately the same time:

Betty Crocker Gluten Free Brownie Mix
Betty Crocker Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookie Mix
Betty Crocker Gluten Free Devils Food Cake Mix
Betty Crocker Gluten Free Yellow Cake Mix

It is our goal to help our consumers determine whether or not they can include our products in their diet when they are not labeled Gluten Free. To accurately accomplish this, we believe it is best to refer to the specific ingredients listed on each product package; and for this reason, we do not offer a gluten-free product list.

However, we do understand that ingredients can be confusing. We want you to be assured that if the ingredient label does not list wheat, barley, rye, oats or gluten containing ingredients sourced from these grains, then the product would be gluten-free. Sources of gluten are listed on the label even if the source of gluten is part of another ingredient (such as flavoring or spice). Because ingredients may vary from one package to another due to product reformulation, you should use the products ingredient label to provide you with current and accurate information.”

Amy Peters, Consumer Services

John Libonati

Sams Club Raw Whole Chickens Are Gluten Free

April 6th, 2009 by John Libonati

sams_club_logo
Sams Club raw whole chickens are gluten free. (Post below can be found at the gluten free weight watchers blog.)

I double checked the status of the raw whole chickens I buy. When I read the label yesterday it said the ingredients contain “chicken broth”. I know a lot of broths have gluten so I shot an e-mail to Pilgrim’s pride. Their website did have a listing of items that are gluten free but I did not see whole chickens.

It looks like they are GF (see below).

Kim

_____

From: Dreika Linwood [mailto:Dreika.Linwood@ pilgrimspride. com]
Sent: Friday, April 03, 2009 1:17 PM
Subject: RE: Other – Response Requested

Thank you for your email. Yes, our whole chickens are gluten free.

Dreika Linwood

Pilgrim’s Pride Corporation

Consumer Relations Rep ll

903-434-7532 Direct

800-321-1470