Archive for the ‘Celiac disease’ Category

 


This just in from the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness...

Whether you're a dietitian ready for new information or a celiac in need of quality gluten-free tips, this Webinar will put you in the know!

"Veggies & Beyond: Why Celiacs Need a Nutritionally Dense Diet"

Thursday, October 7 at 1 p.m. Eastern/10 a.m. Pacific Time

Join NFCA as GREAT Dietitian Melissa Marek, RD, from Axxya Systems (more…)


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Today is National Celiac Disease Awareness Day in the United States. From the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness website:

September 13 has been dubbed “National Celiac Disease Awareness Day” in honor of the doctor who identified a link between celiac disease and diet. Dr. Samuel Gee, a leader in celiac disease research, was born on Sept. 13, 1839.

Senate resolution calling for the commemoration gained unanimous approval on Aug. 3, 2010. In marking the awareness day, the Senate "recognizes that all people of the United States should become more informed and aware of celiac disease," the resolution stated.

Below is the full text of the resoluation, found at OpenCongress.com. (more…)

Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Easy Bruising Due to Vitamin K Deficiency in Celiac Disease

September 9th, 2010 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Do you know someone who bruises easily? Do the marks develop into dark bluish swellings that hurt and take a long time to go away? If you have celiac disease, perhaps you had this problem before starting the gluten-free diet.

Easy bruising is a type of ecchymosis, or superficial bleeding under the skin or mucous membrane, common in untreated celiacs - and may be the only symptom of celiac disease. While always a sign of an underlying problem, (more…)

Editor’s note: This important study demonstrated that short chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels in stool samples were abnormal in participating children with celiac disease, with and without treatment with gluten-free diet. SCFAs are healthy energy byproducts produced by microflora (beneficial organisms) in the colon during fermentation of undigested carbohydrates arriving from the small intestine. SCFAs nourish the colonocytes, cells that line the colon, to maintain normal function. They also help absorb salts and water from stool.  

"Gut Microflora Associated Characteristics in Children with Celiac Disease"

Tjellström B, et. al.

Microbiology and Tumour Biology Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Am J Gastroenterol. 2005 Dec;100(12):2784-8.

 

Background and aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the (more…)

 

Editor’s note: Promising research published January 8, 2007 shows that adequate levels of vitamin D in the elderly are important to maintain cognitive function or thinking skills that include use of language, awareness, social skills, math ability, memory, reasoning, judgment, intellect, learning, and imagination. This study is called a retrospective review because the researchers did not actually examine anyone. Instead they reviewed data from records of 32 older adults who had been examined for memory (more…)

 

Editor’s note: In this case report of infants with severe malabsorption from celiac disease, the treating physicians found copper deficiencies based on blood studies that showed severe low copper levels and white blood cell count.  Treatment required copper supplementation in addition to the gluten-free diet.  Normally, in the last few months of gestation, an infant  stores a large amount of copper in their liver.  This storage must last about 6 months because infants must derive their nourishment from copper-poor milk.  This case report shows dramatically the terrible effect of malabsorption coupled with a naturally occurring huge demand for copper that could not be satisfied through digestion. (more…)

 

 Editors’ note: This study investigating the value and safety of Candin for clinical use in children demonstrated effectiveness and safety.  Candin is a reagent or skin test for sensitivity to Candida albicans, a yeast microorganism that can cause infection.  The study recommends using Candin in combination with other reagents in infants with anergy to see if they react to antigens other than Candida albicans.  Anergy is described in Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary as the impaired or absent ability to react to common antigens administered through skin testing. Antigens are markers on the surface of cells that stimulate production of antibodies.  In this study, Candin was tested at the same time as a skin test for tuberculosis (purified protein derivative tuberculosis) for comparison of results. (more…)

Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Understanding and treating calcium deficiency in celiac disease

August 18th, 2010 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body. About 99% of this essential nutrient is contained in bones and teeth with the rest being in blood and other tissues. Calcium is needed for strong bones and teeth and for nerve conduction, muscle contraction, heart muscle function, blood pressure regulation, glycogen to glucose conversion, initiation of blood clotting, many hormone actions, many enzyme activities and making acetylcholine, an important chemical for nerve transmission. Calcium plays a part in the prevention of colon cancer.

Most importantly, calcium opposes phosphorus as a buffer to maintain the acid-alkaline balance of the blood and is critical for milk production in the nursing of infants.

Calcium absorption in the small intestine is complex and has specific requirements.  (more…)

Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Understanding Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) Deficiency in Celiac Disease

August 11th, 2010 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Riboflavin is a micronutrient, also known as Vitamin B2, which performs many important functions in the body. Riboflavin is a water-soluble vitamin that releases energy from carbohydrates, amino acids, and lipids. It plays a key role in specific amino acid production and provides antioxidant protection. Riboflavin is essential for growth and production of red blood cells and maintaining healthy skin, eyes, hair, and nervous system.

Riboflavin Deficiency

More than 34% of Americans get less than the RDA because, unlike other vitamins, riboflavin is not found in many foods.

Riboflavin depletion and/or deficiency is common before starting the gluten-free diet treatment. It frequently results from malabsorption due to damage to the small intestinal lining, but can also be depleted by excretion through diarrhea, excessive sweating or excessive urination. It is important to note that riboflavin deficiency can result from low serum proteins, which is a common occurrence in untreated celiac disease.

When riboflavin deficiency appears after starting the gluten-free diet, it is usually due to (more…)

According to the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearing House, a study published in the December 2008 issue of the Journal of Insurance Medicine reports that researchers from Columbia University and CIGNA HealthCare found that diagnosis of celiac disease substantially reduces subsequent health care costs. 

The research group, led by Peter Green, M.D., a renowned authority in celiac disease from Columbia University,  looked at medical records for 10.2 million CIGNA managed care members.   (more…)