Archive for the ‘Symptoms’ Category

 

Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Understanding Vitamin D Deficiency in Celiac Disease

June 17th, 2010 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN


 

Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin for strong bones and teeth, turns out to be a multi-tasker! Since its discovery in the early 1920s, this important fat-soluble vitamin was labeled simply as “the antirachitic vitamin” (prevents rickets). Not any more. A major discovery of how it functions as a hormone in the body when converted into its active form by the liver has spurred intense research which is revealing much more about this amazing vitamin.

We now know the active form of vitamin D is essential for the regulation of calcium and phosphorus balance in the body, the absorption of calcium and phosphorus from food in the digestive tract, proper neuromuscular function, normal growth and development and normal bone and tooth formation and maintenance. Recent medical research suggests vitamin D may also provide protection from hypertension, cancer, and several autoimmune diseases. (more…)


 Identifying celiac disease may seem simple enough. After all, there are tests your doctor can perform to determine if your body is reacting to gluten, the grain protein that those with celiac disease cannot tolerate. However, it is becoming more and more accepted that celiac disease may not always present as classic gut symptoms. Instead, celiac disease can cause and contribute to other diseases, deficiencies, ailments, and conditions. Because of this, some people with celiac disease may be diagnosed with diseases that could have been prevented or can be eliminated by a simple gluten-free diet. In other words, celiac is often considered the “root cause” of other conditions, even though it is seldom tested for in chronically-ill people. (more…)

May is Celiac Disease Awareness month. One in 100 people have Celiac Disease and only 3 percent are diagnosed in the United States. Part of the reason for the low rate of diagnosis is the range of symptoms of the disease.

A new video on Youtube does an excellent job of showcasing the many symptoms of Celiac Disease.

For more information about Celiac Disease visit the following websites: (more…)

Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Magnesium Deficiency in Celiac Disease – Common and Dangerous

April 16th, 2010 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body, providing an indication of just how important this nutrient is for the body.

Magnesium keeps us moving, thinking and behaving normally. Magnesium is a cofactor for more than 300 enzymes involved in the metabolism of food components and many products such as protein synthesis. It balances calcium in the body to maintain normal muscle and nerve function and works in concert with calcium to keep bones strong. It keeps heart rhythm steady and supports a healthy immune system. Magnesium is required for parathyroid hormone secretion, helps regulate blood sugar levels and promotes normal blood pressure.1

Studies show that magnesium deficiency is common in those with celiac disease. (more…)

Editor’s Note: The malabsorption resulting from undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease has been well documented in research, but is still little known among physicians. The medical reference Recognizing Celiac Disease contains over 16 pages of reproductive disorders and lists the nutritional deficiencies that cause each.

In a recent New York Times article, Can Foods Contribute To Infertility?, Dr. Sheila Crowe, a professor in the division of gastroenterology and hepatology in the department of medicine at the University of Virginia, brings to light a lesser-known contributor to infertility in both men and women: Celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA). (more…)

A new documentary produced by Gary Null, a natural health advocate and activist, takes aim at our modern medical establishment and the various ways it could possibly be contributing to chronic illness, neurological phenomenon and conditions, and specifically, Autism.

Null delves into the relationship between vaccines, food, environmental pollutants, the childhood Autism pandemic in America and what can be done about the increasing numbers. According to the Center for Disease Control, as of 2010, 1 in every 110 children will be diagnosed with Autism. (more…)

John Libonati

How to Lose Weight on the Gluten-Free Diet

January 21st, 2010 by John Libonati

The traditional look of celiac disease was an underweight person. However, a large minority (39%) are now found to be overweight at diagnosis.

A woman with a history of struggling to lose weight is diagnosed with celiac disease. After starting the gluten-free diet she loses 50 lbs in less than a year…seemingly without effort. A middle-aged man who has never had issues with his weight is diagnosed with celiac disease, adopts the gluten-free diet and begins to pack on pounds and doesn’t know why. A young man loses over 20 lbs in less than 3 months and reaches his ideal weight after going gluten-free.

These are true stories – in fact the last one was mine. (more…)

Liz_Schau

As common at they are, gluten allergies and elimination diets are still, many times, viewed as fringe alternative health practices and often don’t receive the mainstream validation they deserve. When some estimates show that nearly 1 in 30 people suffer at the hands of gluten, one would think the intolerance to this protein would finally gain more acceptance in mainstream medicine and media. One man, doctor and author Mark Hyman, is working to do just that.

HymanHyman, an M.D. in the field of functional medicine, pioneers techniques that aide the chronically-ill in improving their health and quality of life by determining the underlying causes of illness and treating according to those causes, as opposed to much mainstream medicine that focuses on treatments that champion subsistence and reliance on a medication. Doctor Hyman is a blogger for The Huffington Post and in a recent article, cites gluten allergies and Celiac Disease (even latent Celiac) as the cause for many ailments and conditions never previously associated with the grain protein. (more…)

The debate about autism and the effectiveness of the gluten-free, casein-free diet continues – this time due to irresponsible reporting of the mainstream news media who seem to have chosen sensationalism over objective journalism when covering an important medical paper on gastrointestinal disorders in autism.

This week, a panel of medical experts led by Timothy Buie, MD at Harvard Medical School published a consensus statement on the Evaluation, Diagnosis and Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders in Individuals with ASDs (Autism Spectrum Disorders) in the medical journal Pediatrics. You can find the full paper here.

The panel covered 23 topics in a document that is 20 pages in length, dealing with the diagnosis and care of individuals with autism spectrum disorders and gastrointestinal issues. The panel based its conclusions on available information which they agreed was limited and incomplete.

The Key Topic

“Individuals with autism spectrum disorders who present with gastrointestinal symptoms warrant a thorough evaluation, as would be undertaken for individuals without autism spectrum disorders who have the same symptoms or signs. Evidence based algorithms for the assessment of abdominal pain, constipation, chronic diarrhea, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) should be developed.”

Some of the other topics include recommendations for the banking of DNA samples, the complexity of diagnostic evaluation when ASD and gastrointestinal disorders present, the need for studies to determine the prevalence of intestinal permeability in neuropsychiatric manifestions of ASD, and the need for large studies to determine the effectiveness of the gluten-free, casein-free diet. (more…)

[Editor's Note: The following is a post I recently submitted to a listserv concerning attitude and nutritional deficiencies in celiac disease. I posted it in response to a heated exchange folks were having on the topic.]

Hi there,

The “rage” we see in posts from time to time is part and parcel with celiac disease. My business is celiac disease. I own Glutenfreeworks.com and edited the book, Recognizing Celiac Disease.

I frequently see abnormal personalities in my travels, presentations, discussions and on listservs. I meet people with anxiety, depression, irritability, distrust and other unexplained “attitudes.” There is an explanation - and no they aren’t jerks, as much as people might want to call them that. Whether they are gluten-free or not, they are sick – malnourished in fact.

Nutrients play a huge part in our attitude.

Here is an example. While dropping off a shipment of Recognizing Celiac Disease books at the post office on Friday, a woman in line with thinning hair and poor skin color noticed my Gluten Free Works label. She asked what the packages were and I told her the packages contained books I was sending to customers.

She immediately launched into a tirade about how only biopsy-proven people have celiac disease and people are making money off celiac disease and how she should write a book because her daughters have celiac disease and she has read all the research and knows everything… (more…)