Symptoms

Decreasing Inflammation – Important

inflammationHey there! I have a super important message for you about inflammation.

We all know inflammation is bad. Advertisements for medicines on the TV talk about it all the time, blaming it for everything from heart disease to arthritis.

Inflammation is bad. It is so bad that we include decreasing inflammation as a part of treating every condition in our Gluten Free Works Health Guide.

But, what is inflammation and how do we stop it? Read More »

Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease

dental_defects_celiacdisease

Dentists can be the first identifiers of celiac disease. Up to 89% of people with celiac disease exhibit dental enamel defects. Dental enamel defects are characterized by alteration in the hard, white, dense, inorganic substance covering the crowns of the teeth. These defects may include demarcated opacities (white spots), undersized teeth, yellowing, grooves and/or pitting on one or more permanent teeth.(1)

A study of 128 patients on a gluten-free diet revealed that changes in the permanent teeth may be the only sign of an otherwise symptomless celiac disease.(1) It should also be noted that calcium and vitamin D deficiencies are common in celiac disease. Deficiencies of these nutrients lead to cavities.

“Dentists mostly say it’s from fluoride, that the mother took tetracycline, or that there was an illness early on,” said Peter H.R. Green, M.D., director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University. “Celiac disease isn’t on the radar screen of dentists in this country. Dentists should be made aware of these manifestations to help them identify Read More »

Dentists Can Help to Recognize Celiac Disease

[Editor’s Note: Article first published Jul 2, 2008]

Photo credit: Oral Source

Dentistry Blog

By Tammy Davenport, About.com Guide to Dentistry since 2005

Celiac disease causes the body’s immune system to damage and attack the small intestine upon consumption of proteins in barley, rye, wheat and possibly oats. Since there are no specific blood tests to determine if someone has Celiac disease, doctors use blood tests to look for certain autoantibodies and biopsy the small intestine to look for traits of Celiac disease. Nancy Lapid, our Guide to Celiac Disease, points out that certain dental conditions are more common in people with this disease, which puts dentists in a good position to help notice when a patient might Read More »

Do Symptoms Worsen When You Eat Gluten After Being Gluten-Free?

Facebook Gluten Free WorksThe body goes through changes when people adopt a gluten-free diet. Many find their health problems melt away. But what about when they accidentally ingest gluten? Gluten Free Works wanted to find out whether folks discover their symptoms change in intensity after they have been gluten-free for awhile, so we posed the following question on our Facebook page

 

Do you notice when you accidentally eat gluten that your symptoms are WORSE now that you have been gluten-free for awhile? Or, are they not as bad??

 

Here are their answers…

 

Do You Think Your Life Would Have Been Different If You Had Known About Gluten at an Early Age???

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

We asked people on on the Glutenfreeworks Twitter account how they felt about whether finding out earlier about their gluten sensitivity or celiac disease would have affected their lives.

Here is what they said.

Do you think your life would have been different if you had known about gluten at an early age???

 

@Glutenfreeworks incredibly. My senior year of high school probably wouldn’t be going so poorly if I had…. Read More »

Does Calcium Affect Magnesium Absorption?

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We received a message from a Gluten Free Works Health Guide Subscriber yesterday that read, “In ‘calcium deficiency’ it says that calcium hinders absorption of magnesium. But information from doctors and general info always state to take these together because they support one another. Why do you recommend not taking them together?”

The subscriber presented a common sense point. She is seeing information that conflicts with what the Health Guide states. So, what is the deal? Which is correct?

Here is my response, “Calcium interferes with magnesium absorption by taking up receptor sites. If both calcium and magnesium are present in the intestine, the calcium will take precedence and be absorbed. “In one study, addition of 300 to 1000 mg of calcium to the diet decreased magnesium absorption significantly in participants consuming an average of 370 of dietary magnesium daily. While it is true that calcium and magnesium do support each other in the body, the conventional wisdom doesn’t take absorption into account.”

There are two concepts here: 1) absorption and 2) action once in the body. Calcium does interfere with magnesium absorption so take them separately. Calcium and magnesium work together once they have been absorbed into the body, so you need enough of each.

We created the Gluten Free Works Health Guide specifically for people with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. By reviewing thousands of peer-reviewed medical research studies and case reports, we put together a unique, accurate, comprehensive, regularly updated resource that you can use anywhere in the world to understand, fix and maintain your health.

Sometimes, what you hear on TV will differ from the truth. Sometimes, it will be incorrect or taken out of context, like this example. Unfortunately, once this incorrect information is printed or broadcast, other outlets pick it up and spread the misinformation. Within a short time, people believe it is fact, when it is wrong. That is when they stop eating eggs, avocados and carbohydrates.

The Gluten Free Works Health Guide is a medically accurate resource that gives you the tools and information you need to be as healthy as possible, to fix your health issues – hundreds of them – and maintain your well being for life. I strongly encourage you to subscribe here.

Does the severity of celiac disease symptoms correspond with degree of villous atrophy?

Editor’s note: The study below, investigating whether the degree of villous atrophy (intestinal damage) correlates with the symptoms that are presented, found they do not. Therefore, more research is needed to find out why symptoms do not correlate with the degree of intestinal damage.

The pathologic range of villous atrophy seen on small intestinal biopsies ranges from severe (total villous atrophy and subtotal villous atrophy) to milder, partial villous atrophy. Read More »

Domino’s Pizza, Celiac Disease Experts and Defining What Is REALLY Gluten-Free

what is gluten free

Is Food That Contains Gluten Really Gluten-Free?

Domino’s Pizza recently announced it would offer gluten-free pizza for gluten sensitive customers. Domino’s made it clear that the pizzas used a gluten-free crust, but are manufactured using the same equipment as the other gluten-containing foods and are not safe for people with celiac disease.

Domino’s worked with the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) and received the NFCA’s new, and now suspended, “Amber Designation.” This designation was to tell people that although the ingredients are gluten-free, the product cannot claim that cross contamination does not occur. The “Amber Designation” differed from the NFCA’s existing “Green Designation,” which tells the customer that the product is tested to less than 10 parts per million of gluten. “Amber” was basically a caution sign.

What Did Gluten-Free Watchdog Organizations Say?

  • The Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) and other organizations called for a recall of the NFCA’s “Amber Designation.”
  • The North American Society for the Study of Celiac Disease commented on Domino’s Pizza ‘Gluten-Free’ Crust Announcement as follows,

Read More »

Domino’s: Gluten-Free Pizza Not Safe For People With Celiacs

Kristen Beals Gluten Free Works

(Editor’s Note: A follow up on Domino’s Pizza Offers Gluten-Free Pizza…Sort Of)

Domino's Pizza

5/8/2012 9:29 PM ET  (RTTNews) – Domino’s new gluten-free pizza should not be eaten by people with Celiac disease, the company said in a statement. Apparently, the first gluten-free pizza being offered by national pizza chain is designed for people with gluten sensitivity, as opposed to those with full-blown Celiac disease.

Despite the fact that the crust are gluten free, Domino’s can’t guarantee that no gluten will come into contact with the pizza, which could be dangerous for those with the gluten allergy. Read More »

Dr. Stephen Wangen of the IBS Treatment Center in Seattle: An Inside Look

Gluten Free Works Author Jennifer Leeson

I have had the opportunity to connect with Dr. Stephen Wangen, the founder of the IBS Treatment Center in Seattle, WA.  Awhile back, at a CSA (Celiac Sprue Association) meeting I had the pleasure of helping Dr. Wangen with his book signing.  He had flown in to Denver to speak on his books, Healthier Without Wheat and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Solution. There was a full audience of folks, just like you and I, who were able to ask personal questions and learn more about living with Celiac Disease, gluten intolerance, as well as exploring other areas such as food allergies.

Since that time, Dr. Wangen and I have had the chance to talk about what the IBS Treatment Center does to help people really understand their bodies and how food can be affecting them.  He explores the possibilities of Celiac Disease, gluten intolerance and food allergies and helps people to develop a healthier lifestyle tailored to their specific needs.  At the same time, Dr. Wangen has observed the emotional affects these conditions can have on people and understands that not feeling well emotionally has an affect on how people take care of their physical well being.  What makes his practice so fantastic is the positive nature.  Dr. Wangen helps people view the changes by looking at the benfits and the gains and focusing on what people can have, rather than on what they can’t.  Here is what Dr. Wangen had to say when I asked him about his own experiences. Read More »

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