Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

 


Gluten Free Works Jennifer Harris

(Editor's Note: This study is closed.)

I just learned of a new study being conducted by The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Boston, Massachusetts to better understand the attitudes and beliefs of family members of persons with celiac disease.

More information on the study and how you can get involved follows: 

Celiac disease occurs in 10% of first-degree family members, such as a parent or sibling, and up to 20% of second-degree family members, such as an aunt, uncle or


Kelly Clayton Gluten Free Works

Imagine having the power to speak your mind. While you may be thinking to yourself that you already do speak your mind, I am talking about the power to tell every doctor in the world one thing.  We asked our Facebook followers the following:

“If you could tell every doctor on the planet one thing, what would it be?”

After 19 comments, the top three things that would be said to every doctor in the world were: listen to their patients, trust what patients are saying and know more about food allergies.

Listening to your patients

Such a simple idea: listening. It is amazing that many doctors do not listen to their patients, or pretend to listen.  Patients spend much time listening and mulling over what their doctors say, so why can’t doctors return the favor? Facebook follower Jenn Rheaume said, (more…)

Kelly Clayton Gluten Free Works

Just last week BioLineRx, a biopharmaceutical development company announced successful pre-clinical testing of a potentially revolutionary treatment for celiac disease.  This new treatment may help celiac disease patients reduce their gluten toxins to create an overall healthy body for all celiac disease patients.

Jerusalem, Israel – February 21, 2012 – BioLineRx (NASDAQ: BLRX; TASE: BLRX), a biopharmaceutical development company, announced the publication of pre-clinical results demonstrating that BL-7010, an orally available treatment for celiac disease, reduces gluten toxicity (the negative effect of gluten on the patient’s body). The research was published in the February edition of Gastroenterology.

The findings indicate that BL-7010 (previously called P(HEMA-co-SS)) reduces digestion of wheat gluten, thereby decreasing its (more…)

In  Part 1 of this article about nutrient deficiencies in the gluten-free population, I posed four critiques and questions that I promised to answer in today's part 2. Without further ado, here we go...

Critique #1 questioned the small sample size of the research. I can't do anything about that, and there's not much to be said about it, so let's move on.

Next, I think it's easiest to address critique #3: How did nutrient deficiencies in the gluten-free population compare to Americans as a whole? To answer that question, I pulled data regarding nationwide averages from the USDA's Community Nutrition Mapping Project. If I amend yesterday's table that showed the percent of the gluten-free population who are deficient in given nutrients, and add to it a column for the national averages, this is what you find:

 

Nutrient GF Deficiency Nationwide Deficiency
fiber 74% 92%
calcium 82% 69%
thiamin 59% 19%
riboflavin 25% 11%
B6 35% 26%
folate 85% 40%
B12 29% 20%
iron 41% 11%

 

These numbers change the perspective a bit, I think. It's not simply that the gluten-free population is nutrient deficient. When you compare us to the national averages, it gets slightly more complex. In some cases, such as folate, riboflavin, thiamin, and iron, we're two or more times as deficient (as a group) than the nation. However, in other cases, such as B12, B6, and calcium, we still have greater rates (more…)

I was recently reading a press release from Nature's Path Organic about two of their new cereals. The press release made a familiar argument: the cereals "provide gluten avoiders with whole grains... unlike many gluten-free cereals which forfeit nutritional benefits..." The implication is that many gluten-free cereals (and other gluten-free processed foods, by extension) are more highly processed in order to improve taste and texture. But they do so by sacrificing nutritional quality.

There is some truth to this logic. Foods made from whole grains are inherently healthier than heavily processed foods, and I'll use our good old enemy - wheat - to demonstrate. I compared whole grain wheat flour (less processed) with white, unenriched wheat flour (more processed) across a range of nutrient measures. Not surprisingly, the wheat underwent a profound loss in (more…)

Gluten Free Works Author Jennifer Leeson

Mary Klinnert National Jewish Health

Mary Klinnert, PhD at National Jewish Health

I recently had the pleasure of meeting Mary Klinnert, PhD at National Jewish Health. Mary is an expert in child psychology and has numerous previous research studies on the effects of asthma on mental health.  She started her career mostly focusing on asthma, but in recent years, has turned much of her attention to the psychological aspects of living with life threatening food allergies.

While meeting with Mary, she briefed me on a study she is conducting on the psychological aspects of food allergies and how this study differs from the majority of previous studies that mostly focus on quality of life issues related to living with food allergies.  The hope of Mary and the rest of the team is to get to the root of what is happening to families that sometimes contributes to deeper (more…)

Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Why Oats Should Be Excluded from the Gluten-Free Diet

June 20th, 2011 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

oats glutenThe suitability of oats as part of the gluten-free diet has been a source of controversy, with some groups pointing to research suggesting oats are safe and others pointing to other research demonstrating oats are dangerous to those with celiac disease. Close inspection of available medical research clearly shows that oats, even “gluten-free” oats, should not be included in the gluten-free diet at this time.

Until the early 1990’s, oats were excluded from the gluten-free diet, along with wheat, barley and rye. Then, a few pilot studies suggested oats may not cause the harm previously thought. The idea was proposed that people with celiac disease would find their diet more palatable, and would benefit nutritionally, if they were allowed to eat oats.

Heavy contamination of many oat products with wheat, rye, and particularly barley, was a concern. Companies began to produce so-called “gluten-free oats.” These oats were tested for the presence of wheat, barley and rye. They are vigorously marketed as “safe” for celiacs. However, studies show that even “uncontaminated oats” (oats not containing wheat, barley or rye) are toxic to an unknown number of people with celiac disease.

Early studies proclaimed oats to be safe, but they have since been judged faulty with poor validity. Nevertheless, they opened the floodgates to (more…)

Gluten Free Works Jennifer Harris

Columbia University Celiac Disease Center

The Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University invites you to participate in a research study looking at individuals' knowledge of genetic testing of celiac disease and their potential concerns with such testing.  The goal of this study is to increase understanding of the factors associated with making an informed decision regarding such testing and to better provide the necessary information to make such a decision.

A brief survey has been developed to address some of these factors.  The survey only takes five minutes to complete, it is anonymous, and no identifying information is collected. 
 
If you or a family member has celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, (more…)

John Libonati Gluten Free Works

The following article was written by Erika Gebel and reprinted by permision from Chemical and Engineering News.

Celiac Disease Gluten Sensitivity Test

Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity Often Go Undiagnosed

Judging by their symptoms, people with celiac disease could have food poisoning, depression, or iron deficiency. As a result, doctors often have trouble diagnosing the serious immune disorder. To develop a better test for the disease, researchers have made a device that can detect nanograms of gluten antibodies, the hallmarks of celiac disease, in human (more…)

 

acid reflux remedy zinc

Sores from acid reflux

Researchers in Switzerland have made the welcome discovery that the essential nutrient zinc effectively inhibits gastric acid secretion in humans.

The researchers were investigating whether zinc could lead to a rapid and sustained increase of stomach pH (more alkaline) in both animals and humans and provide a rapid acid suppression therapy. They demonstrated that zinc offers a new and prolonged therapy for (more…)