Archive for the ‘History’ Category

 


Gluten Free Works Jennifer Harris

The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act passed in 2004 and it required the FDA to set gluten-free labeling legislation by 2008, but here we are in October 2012 with no finalized gluten-free labeling legislation. There is now an open petition on the White House website asking the Obama administration to finalize gluten-free labeling now.

Largest Gluten Free Cake

Largest Gluten Free Cake

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The History of Celiac Disease

November 29th, 2010 by John Libonati

The earliest description of celiac disease was recorded in the second century A.D. In 1888 Samuel Gee published a monograph on celiac disease that “to regulate the food is the main part of treatment … The allowance of farinaceous foods must be small … but if the patient can be cured at all, it must be by means of diet.”

In the early 1900’s a carbohydrate restricted diet was advocated where the only carbohydrates allowed were ripe bananas and rice. Then in the 1950’s Dr. W. K. Dicke published work reporting that celiac children improved dramatically during World War II when wheat, rye and (more…)

 

Today is National Celiac Disease Awareness Day in the United States. From the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness website:

September 13 has been dubbed “National Celiac Disease Awareness Day” in honor of the doctor who identified a link between celiac disease and diet. Dr. Samuel Gee, a leader in celiac disease research, was born on Sept. 13, 1839.

Senate resolution calling for the commemoration gained unanimous approval on Aug. 3, 2010. In marking the awareness day, the Senate “recognizes that all people of the United States should become more informed and aware of celiac disease,” the resolution stated.

Below is the full text of the resoluation, found at OpenCongress.com. (more…)

The globe-spanning presence of wheat and its exalted status among secular and sacred institutions alike differentiates this food from all others presently enjoyed by humans. Yet the unparalleled rise of wheat as the very catalyst for the emergence of ancient civilization has not occurred without a great price. While wheat was the engine of civilization’s expansion and was glorified as a “necessary food,” both in the physical (staff of life) and spiritual sense (the body of Christ), those suffering from celiac disease are living testimony to the lesser known dark side of wheat. A study of celiac disease may help unlock the mystery of why modern man, who dines daily at the table of wheat, is the sickest animal yet to have arisen on this strange planet of ours.

THE CELIAC ICEBERG

Celiac disease (CD) was once considered an extremely rare affliction, limited to individuals of European origin. Today, however, a growing number of studies indicate that celiac disease is found throughout the US at a rate of up to 1 in every 133 persons, which is several orders of magnitude higher than previously estimated. (more…)