Archive for the ‘Health’ Category

 


by John Libonati

Here are six important facts about celiac disease in the United States:

1. Doctors do not understand celiac disease. 97% of celiacs are not diagnosed. Diagnosis takes over 10 years on average and follow up treatment is poor.

2. Doctors do not understand nutrition. Medical schools do not teach it, so doctors generally do not look for nutrient deficiencies unless you are emaciated.

3. Most of the 300 health problems stemming from celiac disease are due to nutrient deficiencies.

4. Comparing symptoms with one another does not work in celiac disease because symptoms change over time and everyone absorbs or malabsorbs nutrients differently. You may absorb everything but vitamin B12. Another person will not absorb calcium or vitamin D. Even siblings sometimes have totally different symptoms.

5. Symptoms from nutrient deficiencies show up before intestinal damage occurs, but also after starting the gluten-free diet depending on the degree of damage and quality of diet.

6. Most celiacs do not realize how sick they really are. They think, "This is me. I've always been this way." They end up spending thousands of dollars on lotions, salves, medications and surgeries when the root of their problem has been a missing nutrient or nutrients all along.

You need to understand gluten and how celiac disease affects your body if you want to be healthy.

You must be able to identify health problems and the nutritional deficiencies that cause them so you can add the missing nutrients to your diet and inform your doctor to help him treat you.

You need the book, Recognizing Celiac Disease.

Recognizing Celiac Disease teaches you everything about gluten, celiac disease, the health problems it causes and what you need to fix them.

Thousands of celiacs around the world are using Recognizing Celiac Disease…because it works.

"Having been dx with CD for one year, I reached saturation - almost overload point a few months ago. Then I read the summary of "Recognizing Celiac Disease" and felt it might encompass everything I had referenced across numerous articles and books - and more. I love being able to look in the index and go to detailed information in my struggle to ensure my nutritional requirements and deficiencies are being met and addressed." - Reta McCallum, TX

Read how this one of a kind book is helping others at www.recognizingceliacdisease.com.

Order your copy of Recognizing Celiac Disease today. Review it and bring it with you to your next doctor visit. This way you can work with your doctor to make sure you get the best treatment possible.

Visit www.recognizingceliacdisease.com for more information and to see what others are saying.


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By John Libonati

Commonly asked questions on nutrition and Celiac Disease, answered by Melinda Dennis, MS, RD, of the Celiac Disease Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Ms. Dennis has herself had Celiac Disease for more than 17 years.

Q. What is it like for a person you see who is newly diagnosed with Celiac Disease? A. The gluten-free diet requires more preparation, taking food with you when you travel, making sure that you are safe in dining-out situations or when you are visiting with family or friends. So for some, it is very simple and straight forward and they are already experimenting with new grains like amaranth, buckwheat, millet, sorghum, and teff. But some people are completely unfamiliar with these grains and it is a bit more of a stretch for them. Many people just eat on the run these days and this really makes it challenging. Others are in complete denial. Perhaps they were having no symptoms but this was discovered through a blood test and they think – do I really need to change my life? Those are the people who, understandably, ask “how much can I get away with?” So there are all different types of people. But more and more people are coming into the clinic well educated about this because of the good information on the web. That’s a big change from about seven or so years ago when there were very few resources.  

Q. There are many gluten-free foods on the market now. Does this make it easier for those diagnosed with Celiac Disease? A. Yes. But it’s important to stress that the gluten-free diet isn’t just about what we need to take out of our meals, it’s about making sure the foods you do choose have lots of nutrients. Rice, corn and potatoes have a really high glycemic index, and they don’t have a lot of fiber. They can create food cravings. They can lead to weight gain and they are not nutritionally dense. So when we think of Celiac Disease, we think – how can we make up for the fact that we don’t have a very high protein wheat product any longer? What can we substitute and what would be superior? That’s when we work on educating about other grains that are healthier and have plenty of vitamins and minerals. Several of the gluten-free foods are now fortified with B vitamins, iron and trace minerals, and you can check the labels to make sure.  

Q. It’s great there are more gluten-free options, but even reading the labels don’t always help. What items have hidden gluten? A. Lots of things you wouldn’t expect contain gluten. Toothpaste can have gluten; you have to be careful to wash your hands carefully after feeding your dog because chow usually contains gluten. Dental pumice that is used to polish your teeth may contain gluten. Soy sauce, gravies and marinades are suspect. Even communion wafers. Patients need to be educated on all of this, because consistent exposure to gluten will lead to increased damage to the small intestine.  

Q. Do most patients eventually adopt a healthy, gluten-free diet? A. Most patients, even those who have a hard time with the diagnosis, do learn how to eat well. From my own experience, I feel it was actually a blessing to be diagnosed. It changed my life for the better. It empowered me to make the right decisions, to eat well—actually better than I had ever eaten before. I travel more now and experiment with tasty foods, more ethnic food, as well. So it’s a good thing to have a diagnosis—and learn the best ways to take care of your body and be healthy. Above content provided by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. For advice about your medical care, consult your doctor. Source: http://www.thebostonchannel.com:80/bethisrael-old/17014446/detail.html

------------------------ """Author Information: John Libonati, Philadelphia, PA Publisher, Glutenfreeworks.com. Editor & Publisher, Recognizing Celiac Disease. John can be reached by e-mail here."""

Ever wonder what "active ingredients" are and why "inert ingredients" (a hiding place for gluten) are added to vitamins, minerals, herbals or other supplements? Thanks to Nature's Made, you can find out.  Visit http://www.naturemade.com/ProductDatabase/prd_label.asp?tab=Products to access their quick and easy primer on reading label information.   Fast track learn to safely and accurately obtain the % daily you need and other important information like what I.U., mg, and mcg measurements mean.  While you’re there, click on “A consumers guide to smart vitamin use.”

Health Alert - Microbes Matter - Probiotics a.k.a. Good Bacteria in Your Gut

Strange as it seems, our well-being is uniquely tied to the condition of our colon, which is commonly unhealthy at diagnosis of celiac disease. To keep our colon healthy, we need to understand what happens there on a microscopic level.  Hundreds of varieties of intestinal microbe populations called “flora” live there, numbering in the billions.  To put these numbers into focus, dead bacteria make up about a third of each bowel movement.  Our resident microbes, whether beneficial or harmful, play a decisive role in nourishing or damaging the cells that form the intestinal lining.  Probiotic and prebiotic foods and supplements restore and feed our friendly microbes.

Probiotic flora inhibit colonization of pathogens by physically preventing them from adhering to the gut lining.  Other important functions are:

  • Produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA)s.  SCFAs are important and necessary energy byproducts formed during fermentation of undigested carbohydrates in the colon by flora.  SCFAs nourish the colonocytes, the cells that line the colon. They also help absorb salts and water from stool.

  • Produce a form of vitamin K and appreciable amounts of biotin.
  • Reduce the presence of putrefactive enzymes.

  • Protect against toxic substances.

  • Contribute to normal bowel movements.

For these reasons, we need to use probiotics and prebiotics every day to improve our overall health and specifically our intestinal health.  This is especially important if fatigue, weakness, achiness, depression, foggy thinking and digestive problems continue while maintaining a gluten-free diet. 

(This Health Alert was taken from information found in Issue #9 - Microbes Matter of the Gluten Free Gazette.)  Celiac disease is a hereditary, auto-immune disorder estimated to affect 1% of the human population (3 million in the

US). Less than 3 % are estimated to be medically diagnosed, but numbers are expected to rapidly increase as diagnosis improves. Celiac disease is caused by the ingestion of wheat, barley, rye and oats and treated by removing these items from the diet. Signs, symptoms, associated disorders and complications can affect any part of the body and removal of the offending foods can result in complete recovery.  Visit Glutenfreeworks.com for more information.