Archive for the ‘Lifestyle’ Category

 

John Libonati

Gluten free diet cards from Glutenfreeworks.com

July 31st, 2009 by John Libonati


gluten-free-diet-card-3-images-lrge

Glutenfreeworks.com has comprehensive gluten-free diet cards that lists unsafe foods and ingredients (including hidden) broken down by categories: whole grains & cereals, flours, thickeners, sweeteners, distilled spirits, fermented, cooked products, baked products, protein polymers, brewed, germ/bran and other.

Gluten-Free Diet Cards make dining out and shopping for groceries easy. These cards are perfect for eating out at restaurants or comparing ingredient labels when shopping for groceries. No more long explanations to waiters and managers. Just hand them the card. They’ll compare the ingredients to their recipes and let you know what you can have. No more wondering if an ingredient is safe or not when shopping. Just check it against your Gluten Free Works Diet Card. (Always call the company though if you’re unsure!)

The cards are 4″ by 3 1/2″ and fold to wallet size. See what they look like here. Gluten Free Diet Cards

They cost $6.50 for 5 cards, $30 for 25 cards, or $50 for 50 cards. Shipping is included in the price.

You can also get 5 free Gluten-free diet cards when you order a copy of Recognizing Celiac Disease.


John Libonati

Tips For Dining Out On The Gluten-Free Diet

March 4th, 2009 by John Libonati

By Melinda Dennis, MS, RD, LDN
Nutrition Coordinator, Celiac Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Avoid ordering fried foods, such as French fries or taco “basket” shells at a Mexican restaurant, which are fried in the same oil as battered foods or coated fries.

Check to make sure that liquid eggs held in a buffet line for eggs-to-order are not mixed with wheat flour (to keep them from separating).

Ask your server to request that the cooks change their gloves and use a clean skillet and utensils to prepare your food.

If you don’t feel that your needs are being met, ask to speak with the chef or the manager. Carry a restaurant card (available from several of the national celiac support groups and online) that lists safe and prohibited food.

Rice and corn-based cuisines, such as Japanese, Thai, Indian or Mexican, usually have many more naturally gluten free items available than American fast food or standard fare.

If you are with a large group and you prefer not to draw attention to your special diet, order your meal last so that table conversation is flowing and you can take your time. Or excuse yourself and have your conversation with the chef or your server near the kitchen.

If you’ve had a wonderful meal, tip generously, thank the chef and server personally, and tell the restaurant you plan to share your good experience with fellow diners, the local celiac support group and your clinicians. As restaurants are alerted to the needs of those with celiac disease, gluten-free dining out will be more and more enjoyable.

Above content provided by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.
http://www.bidmc.org/celiaccenter
For advice about your medical care, consult your doctor.

Posted March 2009