Archive for the ‘Eating Out’ Category

 


Recently, I had the chance to speak with British drummer Andy Roberston and talk about how he manages touring and the rock ‘n roll lifestyle being gluten-free. Andy has been in the music business for 20 years and has performed with such acts as Roachford, Jocelyn Brown, Hamish Stewart, Jim Mullen, Siobhan Donaghy, Alexander O'Neil, Morcheeba and Jackdaw4, who is releasing their new album, The Eternal Struggle for Justice, next week.

Andy enjoying a break from touring while catching fish in Normandy, France. Monika Agorelius

When were you first diagnosed with celiac and what was your reaction to the news? About 10 years ago. I have not been formally diagnosed as celiac but through a process of elimination discovered that I was definitely allergic to gluten. I did research into what gluten allergies were and what I could and couldn't eat as a result. (more…)


Celiac Sprue Association Logo

Recently, I had lunch at PF Changs in Irvine.  Unfortunately, my lunch did not go as planned as I ended up having an allergic reaction after dining there.  This was quite unfortunate, considering about a year ago I gave PF Changs a glowing review for their committment to catering to food allergies and developing a gluten-free menu that would be free of any cross contamination. 

It's inevitable that every now and then when dining out you will run into something that may cause a reaction, so the key is to take as many preventative measures as possible to reduce the risk. (more…)

Barbeque and outdoor party season has arrived.  It is the time of year when we want to relax and enjoy time with friends.  But having food allergies and issues can put a damper on your party plans.  Here are ten ways to dine safely at an outdoor party.

Outdoor Gluten-free Grilling Courtesy: dreamstime.com

1. Never show-up without something safe to eat Always make sure there is something safe for you to eat at any event. offer to bring a salad or side dish. Make a quinoa salad that everyone will love.   That way you know there is something with protein to eat that will keep you full.  If you bring a dish that is just carbohydrates, you'll be hungry before the party is over. (more…)

I reported this week on a new iPHONE application, My Grocery Master, which allows users to locate gluten-free foods and brands according to zip code. The application claimed to not only allow users to locate gluten-free and lactose-free food items in popular grocery stores nationwide, but it also claimed to help users locate the product via detailed driving directions, all for an annual fee of $4.99.

While this iPHONE application (also available for iPAD and iTOUCH) purported to aide gluten-free consumers in their quest for all things allergen-free, it seems the app isn't all it's cracked up to be. (more…)

Cindy Swan

Avoid gluten free dietary blunders

October 2nd, 2009 by Cindy Swan

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For people with diagnosed celiac disease or autoimmune related gluten intolerance, eating a gluten free diet is not optional. It’s the only medical treatment currently available and requires 100 percent lifelong adherence. veggiesroots In addition, other conditions frequently occur alongside celiac disease and gluten intolerance. Maintaining health requires attention to lifestyle behaviors and adequate nutrition that will improve quality of life and prevent complications. The following three tips will ensure success eating gluten free. (more…)

Tiffany Janes

Gluten-Free 101: How to Pack Food for Trips

September 21st, 2009 by Tiffany Janes

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Many places in the U.S. are not gluten-free friendly and many places are great to visit if you're gluten-free. New York City and Atlanta are fantastic in terms of gluten-free shopping and dining, while Panama City Beach, FL is horrid. For this reason, many people who can't eat gluten pack an extra suitcase full of food for any trip.

Taking your own food on trips is often a good idea. It is a terrible feeling to find yourself without something safe to eat - even if it's just a cracker to nosh on when others around you are dining on gluten filled appetizers. It's a good idea to keep a survival pack of food in your car, even if you're not leaving town. There is something comforting about knowing there is safe food available, should a need for it arise.

If you are traveling from the U.S. to some parts of Europe, you might want to rethink your packing habits. Planning our first visit overseas after my celiac diagnosis was scary. Through much research I knew that it seemed easier to eat out outside the U.S. than at home, but until you experience that for yourself you're a skeptic. (more…)

John Libonati

Gluten free diet cards from Glutenfreeworks.com

July 31st, 2009 by John Libonati

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Glutenfreeworks.com has comprehensive gluten-free diet cards that lists unsafe foods and ingredients (including hidden) broken down by categories: whole grains & cereals, flours, thickeners, sweeteners, distilled spirits, fermented, cooked products, baked products, protein polymers, brewed, germ/bran and other.

Gluten-Free Diet Cards make dining out and shopping for groceries easy. These cards are perfect for eating out at restaurants or comparing ingredient labels when shopping for groceries. No more long explanations to waiters and managers. Just hand them the card. They'll compare the ingredients to their recipes and let you know what you can have. No more wondering if an ingredient is safe or not when shopping. Just check it against your Gluten Free Works Diet Card. (Always call the company though if you're unsure!)

The cards are 4" by 3 1/2" and fold to wallet size. See what they look like here. Gluten Free Diet Cards

They cost $6.50 for 5 cards, $30 for 25 cards, or $50 for 50 cards. Shipping is included in the price.

You can also get 5 free Gluten-free diet cards when you order a copy of Recognizing Celiac Disease.

John Libonati

Tips For Dining Out On The Gluten-Free Diet

March 4th, 2009 by John Libonati

By Melinda Dennis, MS, RD, LDN Nutrition Coordinator, Celiac Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Avoid ordering fried foods, such as French fries or taco “basket” shells at a Mexican restaurant, which are fried in the same oil as battered foods or coated fries.

Check to make sure that liquid eggs held in a buffet line for eggs-to-order are not mixed with wheat flour (to keep them from separating).

Ask your server to request that the cooks change their gloves and use a clean skillet and utensils to prepare your food.

If you don’t feel that your needs are being met, ask to speak with the chef or the manager. Carry a restaurant card (available from several of the national celiac support groups and online) that lists safe and prohibited food.

Rice and corn-based cuisines, such as Japanese, Thai, Indian or Mexican, usually have many more naturally gluten free items available than American fast food or standard fare.

If you are with a large group and you prefer not to draw attention to your special diet, order your meal last so that table conversation is flowing and you can take your time. Or excuse yourself and have your conversation with the chef or your server near the kitchen.

If you’ve had a wonderful meal, tip generously, thank the chef and server personally, and tell the restaurant you plan to share your good experience with fellow diners, the local celiac support group and your clinicians. As restaurants are alerted to the needs of those with celiac disease, gluten-free dining out will be more and more enjoyable.

Above content provided by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. http://www.bidmc.org/celiaccenter For advice about your medical care, consult your doctor.

Posted March 2009