Jen Cafferty

General Mills Publishes Gluten Free Product List

by Jen Cafferty on December 15th, 2009


Cafferty_Jen_Chicago_IL

General Mills has jumped on the gluten-free band wagon expanding their gluten-free product lines. Just this past year, they provided the community with Betty Crocker cake mixes, Chex cereals and even Halloween candies that were clearly labeled “gluten free” on the box.

Turtle Brownie made with Betty Crocker Gluten Free Mix

Turtle Brownie made with Betty Crocker Gluten Free Mix

Gluten Free Product List

You can see the entire list of gluten-free products offered by General Mills at their new website www.liveglutenfreely.com.

To download their product list either go to the site or click here.

Here are a few recipes from the site.
Turtle Brownies
Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies
Chocolate Hazelnut Dream Torte

———————
Author Information: Jen Cafferty, Chicago, IL
Jen Cafferty, Founder, The Gluten Free Cooking Expo
Website: www.glutenfreeclasses.com
Blog: www.glutenfreeexpo.wordpress.com
National GF Reporter for Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/x-12164-GlutenFree-Food-Examiner
Twitter: jenglutenfree
GIG Chicago: www.chicagoglutenfree.com


2 Responses to “General Mills Publishes Gluten Free Product List”

  1. Paul says:

    In Australia, foods cannot be labelled GF unless they contain less than 3ppm. 3ppm-20ppm must be labelled containing “low gluten”. Also if the food is produced in share facilities, where gluten contamination may be possible, the producer/manufacturer must declare this to enable the purchaser to make an informed decision.

  2. Whitney Jones says:

    I would just like to make everyone aware that although General Mills is now producing gluten-free products, they are not producing them in gluten-free facilities. There is a major risk of contamination here. I have Celiac, and I have already experienced the effects of this contamination. Please be careful when you see a product labeled gluten-free. Companies can legally label products gluten-free as long as it contains less than 20 ppm…this is still enough to cause a reaction in someone with Celiac. They can also label products as gluten-free even when they are produced in the same facility and even on the same equipment as products containing gluten.

Leave a Reply