Archive for July, 2009

 

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Celiac Disease Symptoms: The Gluten Free Works Symptom Guide

Could my symptoms be related to celiac disease?

This is a common question people ask in the face of a bewildering array of possible celiac disease symptoms. The Celiac Disease Symptom Guide will help you identify possible symptoms and health problems that you can present to your doctor.

Here is the list of over 300 Signs, Symptoms, Associated Disorders and Complications directly or indirectly resulting from celiac disease.

Gluten Free Works, Inc. was the first organization in the world to publish this information in its comprehensive book, "Recognizing Celiac Disease." This list is now being used by celiac disease centers, national celiac organizations and health organizations worldwide. (more…)


John Libonati

Gluten free diet cards from Glutenfreeworks.com

July 31st, 2009 by John Libonati

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Glutenfreeworks.com has comprehensive gluten-free diet cards that lists unsafe foods and ingredients (including hidden) broken down by categories: whole grains & cereals, flours, thickeners, sweeteners, distilled spirits, fermented, cooked products, baked products, protein polymers, brewed, germ/bran and other.

Gluten-Free Diet Cards make dining out and shopping for groceries easy. These cards are perfect for eating out at restaurants or comparing ingredient labels when shopping for groceries. No more long explanations to waiters and managers. Just hand them the card. They'll compare the ingredients to their recipes and let you know what you can have. No more wondering if an ingredient is safe or not when shopping. Just check it against your Gluten Free Works Diet Card. (Always call the company though if you're unsure!)

The cards are 4" by 3 1/2" and fold to wallet size. See what they look like here. Gluten Free Diet Cards

They cost $6.50 for 5 cards, $30 for 25 cards, or $50 for 50 cards. Shipping is included in the price.

You can also get 5 free Gluten-free diet cards when you order a copy of Recognizing Celiac Disease.

THIS SPECIAL IS OVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Here is a great offer I found on a gluten-free list-serve yesterday.

General Mills jumped into the gluten-free market with their gluten-free Rice Chex. They quickly followed with Chocolate and Strawberry Chex and has launched a growing line of gluten-free baking mixes. Reaction in the gluten-free community has been strongly positive. Now we have another reason to like General Mills.

For a limited time, you can contact General Mills to receive a coupon for a free Gluten Free Betty Crocker baking mix. At $4.49 per box, that's a pretty good freebie!

The list-serve included a message from General Mills:

"Folks can let us know if they want ongoing info/offers about General Mills' growing line of GF products… If they call our Consumer Services number: 1(800)446-1898 (same as is on the boxes), they can sign up. The real perk of this re: the new products is that we have coupons that we'll be sending to each household that signs up this summer so they can try a box of the new Betty Crocker® Gluten Free Dessert Mixes completely on us."

I called for my coupons today. Here is how it works.

Call General Mills Consumer Services number: 1(800) 446-1898. At the main menu, hit #4 or say “four.”

This will take you to a customer representative. I waited about 5 minutes for a representative, a friendly woman named Bridget.

I told Bridget that I was interested in the free gluten-free baking coupons.

She said sure and asked me a few questions. She asked for my zip code, whether my household did not limit gluten ingestion, limited gluten or was gluten-free. She then asked how many people live in the house and where we normally shop for gluten-free food – the name and street address of the store. After that, she requested a phone number and e-mail. (She assured me General Mills does not share private information.)

It was that easy. My coupons are coming the second week of August.

Call today. Nothing beats a freebie – especially when it is gluten-free!

Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Gluten-Free Tex-Mex Squash

July 28th, 2009 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Surprise the family with this colorful side loaded with taste, texture, and nutrition. Or make it for a healthy lunch, with or without, low-fat sour cream or substitute.

Ingredients
  • 2 cups yellow (summer) squash, cubed
  • 1/3 cup water
  • sprinkle of salt and pepper
  • 1 teaspoon cilantro, chopped
  • 1 cup cooked rice (leftover)
  • 1/2 cup (or more to taste) gluten-free refried beans
Equipment

Medium pot with lid.

Process
  1. Wash and chop the squash into 1/2 inch cubes. 
  2. Pour water into the pot and bring to boil. 
  3. Add the chopped squash, salt and pepper.
  4. Turn down heat to low medium and cook for 5 minutes.
  5. Stir in the cooked rice, cilantro, and refried beans.
  6. Cook 2 more minutes to heat through.
Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Old Fashioned Stomped Lemon-ade

July 28th, 2009 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

This tangy, refreshing lemon-ade has stood the test of time not just for extracting loads of vitamin C from the rind, but for exceptional taste. Someone can always be found to do the stomping, especially children. Makes a quart. New wooden stompers can be easily bought, or have fun looking for the old, turned ones found at garage sales or flea markets.

Ingredients
  • 1 large fresh lemon
  • 1/2 cup Gluten Free Works fructose
  • 1 quart of fresh water
Equipment

A heavy glass pitcher and a wooden stomper.

Process
  1. Scrub the lemon with baking soda on a clean wet cloth.
  2. Rinse well then cut into thin slices.
  3. Toss the lemon slices into the pitcher with the fructose.
  4. Stomp a few minutes until the juice is rendered, but not so long as to mash the rinds.
  5. Stir, add ice cubes and enjoy!
Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

Gluten-Free Ham and Potato Salad

July 28th, 2009 by Cleo Libonati, RN, BSN

This old recipe is rich in flavor and appeal. It goes well with any main meat dish, salad, or sandwich.

Ingredients
  • 2 cups white potatoes such as red bliss, yukon gold, or russet
  • 1/2 cup celery, chopped
  • 1/4 cup parsley, chopped
  • 1 cup cooked Canadian bacon, sugar-free, or 4 strips of sugar-free bacon, cooked and crumbled
  • 1/2 cup gluten-free mayonnaise
  • 2 T unpasteurized apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp. salt and 1/2 tsp. black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp. celery seeds

 

Equipment

A large mixing bowl.

Process
  1. Cooked Canadian bacon does not need preparation, just cut it into small cubes. Bacon needs to be fried and crumbled with a T of the fat for flavor.
  2. Cook the potatoes in salted water until tender but not falling apart. Drain, cover the pot and keep warm.
  3. Meanwhile, wash and chop the celery and parsley.  Add to pot with the potatoes. Add the vinegar, mayonnaise, salt, pepper, and celery seed. Stir in the bacon, blending all ingredients without mashing the potatoes. Serve warm in a large bowl. 

 

 

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers believe they have finally answered a basic question about the cause of celiac disease -- where in the body does the wheat protein gluten enter one's system?

A study published in the July issue of Gastroenterology identifies the CXCR3 receptor in the intestine as a gluten gateway. When people with celiac disease eat gluten, the protein triggers their immune system to attack the body, causing a wide range of serious health problems.

"This is a scientific question that had never been answered before," Dr. Alessio Fasano, medical director of the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said in an university news release. "It is not only significant in the basic science of autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease, but in therapeutic approaches for the future. This opens a new scientific paradigm for the study of immunity."

The research team found that gliadin, the part of gluten that causes the most trouble for those with celiac disease, binds to the CXCR3 receptor. This results in the release of zonulin, a human protein that lowers the intestinal barrier to make it more permeable. While this effect is temporary in most people, the barrier stays down for long periods of time in people with celiac disease, causing disruption in the body's system.

The finding may help in research on the cause and treatment for other autoimmune diseases, Fasano said. People with type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis may experience a similar condition in which offending antigens enter the body through this gateway in the intestines.

"For the first time, we have evidence of how the foreign antigen gains access to the body, causing the autoimmune response," said Fasano, who is also a pediatric gastroenterologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center. "Further study is needed, but this could allow us to intervene before the zonulin is either released or activated, preventing the immune response altogether."

------------------------- Author Information: John Libonati, Philadelphia, PA Publisher, Glutenfreeworks.com. Editor & Publisher, Recognizing Celiac Disease. John can be reached by e-mail here.

csa-logo The Celiac Sprue Association (CSA) made the initial presentation of its pilot physician education program to Robert Wergin, MD, at the Milford Family Center in Milford, Nebraska. Recently named ‘Family Physician of the Year,” Dr. Wergin is in general practice at the Milford Clinic.

With this presentation, CSA launched the first phase of the most ambitious celiac disease physician education program in United States history – the CSA Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity Physician Education Program (CSA-PEP).

The CSA-PEP was created to increase diagnosis and improve treatment while increasing celiac disease awareness in the medical community and the public. It will provide 60,800 doctors and 10,000 medical students with information and resources that will aid them in identifying, diagnosing and treating people with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity.

The program is designed so individuals have the option, with a donation of $70 or more, to present the CSA-PEP package to their personal physicians so they can receive optimal care.

This program advances CSA efforts to promote the CSA mission statement: “Celiacs Helping Celiacs.”

Materials in the CSA-PEP package include both physician and patient information: National Institutes of Health (NIH) celiac disease materials; information on dermatitis herpetformis; a gluten-free diet guide by Dr. Jean Guest, CSA’s consultant dietitian; the CSA Gluten-Free Product Listing; the medical reference Recognizing Celiac Disease; a current issue of the CSA Lifeline membership newsletter; fact sheets, brochures, patient pamphlets and other CSA publications.

For more information about this opportunity or to get involved with fundraising and distribution, please contact the CSA at 1-877-CSA-4CSA, or visit CSA online at www.csaceliacs.org.

Celiac disease is the most common inherited autoimmune disease in the world. The National Institutes of Health estimates 1% of the United States population has celiac disease, making it more common than breast cancer, autism or type 1 diabetes. Of the 3 million people in the US who have celiac disease, less than 5% are diagnosed. Gluten sensitivity is estimated to affect many more people than celiac disease. Healthcare costs of untreated celiac disease are estimated to run $14.5 to $35 billion per year. The disorder is triggered by ingesting wheat, barley, rye or oats and results in inflammation, tissue damage, and malabsorption of nutrients leading to a host of varied symptoms. The treatment of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity is removing wheat, barley, rye and oats from the diet.

With almost 100,000 contacts, over 9,000 members and 125 local support group chapters across the country, the Celiac Sprue Association (CSA) is the largest member-based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to helping individuals with celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis worldwide through education, information and research.

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7/21/2009 Wonderful, gluten-free evening at Citizens Bank Park. ________________________________________ The Philadelphia Phillies supported NFCA and other area celiac support groups by hosting celiac disease awareness night at Citizens Bank Park on Monday, and commemorated the occasion with a 10-1 victory over the Chicago Cubs!

From MLB.com

Phillies host Celiac Awareness Night Club raises money, spreads info on digestive disease By David Gurian-Peck / MLB.com

PHILADELPHIA -- The Phillies hosted the second Celiac Awareness Night at Citizens Bank Park on Monday, raising money for and spreading information about the autoimmune digestive disease that affects roughly three million Americans.

Celiacs cannot eat gluten, a protein particle found in wheat, barley, rye and all of their derivatives.

In conjunction with the Phillies, the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) sold over 500 tickets for Monday night's game against the Cubs, raising over $2,000. Aramark set up a stand of gluten-free food items behind the section, including hot dogs, cheeseburgers, chicken fingers, Redridge beer and Woodchuck draft cider.

Most of these are offered every night at select locations throughout Citizens Bank Park, which for three consecutive years has been named the No. 1 vegetarian ballpark by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).

"So many parents and concerned fans give me a call and want to see what's available to them," said David Lippman, director of concessions for Aramark. "A lot of folks were just thrilled that they have something here. They can come here, enjoy their team and eat something. "

Oz Ostrofsky -- whose wife, Nany Lozoff, has celiac disease and whose daughter is gluten-intolerant -- was selected to throw out the ceremonial first pitch.

"It's an honor to be nominated by the NFCA and it's great to be on the field with the World [Series] champions," said Ostrofsky, a former chef who has worked to increase the number of gluten-free items in Philadelphia restaurants. "It's about making it easy for everyone. So no one's 'special needs,' no one has to go out of their way."

Indeed, awareness was the No. 1 objective of Monday's charity event, since 97 percent of celiacs are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Celiacs who, unaware of their condition, continue to eat products with gluten suffer nutritional problems, especially anemia; reproductive disorders, which affects half of all women with celiac disease; insufficient growth in children; reduced bone density; neurological disorders; and some cancers. Although research is under way, there is currently no cure or vaccine; the only treatment is a lifelong gluten-free diet.

"How could you get more awareness than to be with the Phillies?" said Nancy Ginter, NFCA director of operations. "It's a great forum, and everybody's watching the Phillies. ... What we want to engender is instead of saying, 'Oh my God, I've got celiac disease, and this will be horrible,' to say, 'No, it's great. Now you know what's wrong with you.'"

More information on gluten-free options at Citizens Bank Park can be found here.

More information on celiac disease can be found here.

David Gurian-Peck is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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Join the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) and Celiac Groups in the Delaware Valley for Celiac Awareness Night at Citizens Bank Park on Monday, July 20, 2009 at 7:05 p.m. when the Phillies face the Chicago Cubs. This is a fun-filled, gluten-free event that the entire family will enjoy. Citizens Bank now has gluten-free beer, gluten-free hot dogs and other gluten-free foods for kids and adults.

Tickets are located on the Pavilion (Sections 206 - 208) and the Pavilion Deck (Sections 307 - 308), but I would recommend getting yours ahead of time. They sold out early last year. Sections in 307 and 308 are selling for $22 each and sections 206, 207 or 208 are $30 each. Proceeds from ticket sales for this event will support raising celiac awareness and funds for research.

Celiac Groups in the Delaware Valley include The Greater Philadelphia Area Celiac Support Group, R.O.C.K., Children's Celiac Center of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, CEPA, and F.A.C.T.

To order your tickets, click on the "Buy Tickets" button below and enter the promotion code CELIAC.

“Buy Tickets”

For groups of 25 or more, contact Stephanie Nieland in the Group Sales Office at 215.463.5000 ext. 5111.

So come on out, grab a gluten-free hot dog and watch the game. See you at the game!

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