Archive for April 20th, 2009

 


starbucks-gluten-free-cake

(UPDATE: Starbucks no longer carries the Valencia Orange Cake.)

Starbucks Corp. will begin selling its first gluten-free pastry in its U.S. stores next month in response to requests from its customers.

The pastry, called Valencia Orange Cake, will be made with seven ingredients which are all 100 percent gluten-free, the company said. The cake will be sold in individually wrapped packages for $2.25 each and will be available beginning May 5.

Starbucks said it wanted to offer its gluten-free customers more choices.

“I think one of the things we learned right from the get-go from our gluten-free customers is they can’t eat away from home very easily,” said Adrienne Knapp, a product manager in the food category at Starbucks. “A cake is actually really hard to find for someone that’s a gluten-free consumer.”

Gluten is a protein common in rye, wheat, barley and other grains. More than 3 million Americans are thought to suffer from a condition called celiac disease, which is associated with intolerance to gluten. Even more people claim they are sensitive to wheat and other gluten-filled grains.

Starbucks said it has received numerous requests from its customers for gluten-free foods on its mystarbucksidea.com Web site. The site allows customers to submit ideas for how to improve the company, its drinks and its food.

Source: http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2009/04/17/ap6305750.html


cow

The following questions concern whether villous atrophy can be caused by milk and whether anemia can result from milk ingestion. The answer is yes: bovine beta casein enteropathy can cause both. See full explanation below.

Question:Does anyone know can a deficiency in lactase enzyme cause the villi to be blunted? My 3 year old son just had an endoscopy and it showed the villi are blunted.

My son has a lactase deficiency and has been gluten free for 18 months. We took him off lactose for the first 6 months after being diagnosed but then added it back and he seemed fine for 6 months.

So I am hoping maybe the fact that he was drinking a lot of milk caused the villi to be blunted and not ingesting any gluten?

Also, can that cause anemia?

My son is also slightly anemic. But we are very strict with his diet and I am pretty sure he is not getting any gluten ( i know its possible but I don’t think so… his diet hasn’t changed..)

Celiac antibody blood tests indicate he is not getting gluten?

So i am wondering if the lactose could be causing the villi to be blunted and the anemia???

Thanks,
S

Answer:
Dear S,

The most common cause of villous atrophy in people with celiac disease is unintentional gluten ingestion. This answer assumes no gluten is being ingested.

Cow dairy can cause an enteropathy similar to celiac disease. It is called Bovine Beta Casein Enteropathy. It acts like celiac disease, causing inflammation leading to villous blunting. The milk protein elicits the antibody reaction just like gluten does in celiac disease.

The resulting villous blunting would explain lactose intolerance, as the lactase enzymes needed to digest lactose are produced and release near the tips of the villi. If the villi are blunted, no lactase is being produced and milke digestion does not occur.

Bovine beta casein enteropathy is marked by diarrhea, failure to thrive, vomiting, atopic eczema and recurrent respiratory infections. It causes malabsorption of nutrients, just like celiac disease, so it can lead to nutrient deficiencies including anemia. 12% of those with bovine beta casein enteropathy are found to have celiac disease.

-John Libonati

Source: Recognizing Celiac Disease. p. 147
www.recognizingceliacdisease.com

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